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Vermilion Drift PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Vermilion Drift
Author: William Kent Krueger
Publisher: Published September 7th 2010 by Atria Books (first published September 2nd 2010)
ISBN: 9781439153840
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Some nights, Corcoran O'Connor dreams his father's death. William Kent Krueger's gripping tale of suspense begins with a recurring nightmare, a gun, and a wound in the earth so deep and horrific that it has a name, Vermilion Drift. When the Department of Energy puts an underground iron mine on its short list of potential sites for storage of nuclear waste, a barrage of pro Some nights, Corcoran O'Connor dreams his father's death. William Kent Krueger's gripping tale of suspense begins with a recurring nightmare, a gun, and a wound in the earth so deep and horrific that it has a name, Vermilion Drift. When the Department of Energy puts an underground iron mine on its short list of potential sites for storage of nuclear waste, a barrage of protest erupts in Tamarack County, Minnesota, and Cork is hired as a security consultant. Deep in the mine during his first day on the job, Cork stumbles across a secret room that contains the remains of six murder victims. Five appear to be nearly half a century old;connected to what the media once dubbed "The Vanishings," a series of unsolved disappearances in the summer of 1964, when Cork's father was sheriff in Tamarack County. But the sixth has been dead less than a week. What's worse, two of the bodies, including the most recent victim, were killed using Cork’s own gun, one handed down to him from his father. As Cork searches for answers, he must dig into his own past and that of his father, a well-respected man who harbored a ghastly truth. Time is running out, however. New threats surface, and unless Cork can unravel the tangled thread of clues quickly, more death is sure to come. Vermilion Drift is a powerful novel, filled with all the mystery and suspense for which Krueger has won so many awards. A poignant portrayal of the complexities of family life, it's also a sobering reminder that even those closest to our hearts can house the darkest, and deadliest, of secrets.

30 review for Vermilion Drift

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Number 10 in the series and I am giving it five stars. Vermilion Drift is a nice blend of cold cases and a recent murder linked by the fact that the same gun was used in both. As usual Cork does his own investigating - cooperation is not in his vocabulary! Nevertheless he is a smart man and he solves the case with hard work and some intuition. This is a new stage in Cork's life, one without the presence of a wife or children. His sole companion is Trixie the dog, but I think I detected the beginni Number 10 in the series and I am giving it five stars. Vermilion Drift is a nice blend of cold cases and a recent murder linked by the fact that the same gun was used in both. As usual Cork does his own investigating - cooperation is not in his vocabulary! Nevertheless he is a smart man and he solves the case with hard work and some intuition. This is a new stage in Cork's life, one without the presence of a wife or children. His sole companion is Trixie the dog, but I think I detected the beginning of a new relationship. He also discovers a few secrets of his own from the past which are quite shocking, but their revelation will enable him to move forward. As usual there are beautiful descriptions of nature, some great characters and intriguing events. I am thoroughly enjoying this whole series.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Cork O’Connor has entered a new phase of his life as his children are now away from home living their adult lives and Jo is gone. He and dog Trixie are living a solitary existence and his role as a security consultant/private investigator keeps him pretty busy. His current assignment is as a consultant for the Vermilion One mine, which is being considered as a nuclear waste site and predictably that’s not going over well with members of the community. He’s also hired to find the sister of Max Ca Cork O’Connor has entered a new phase of his life as his children are now away from home living their adult lives and Jo is gone. He and dog Trixie are living a solitary existence and his role as a security consultant/private investigator keeps him pretty busy. His current assignment is as a consultant for the Vermilion One mine, which is being considered as a nuclear waste site and predictably that’s not going over well with members of the community. He’s also hired to find the sister of Max Cavanaugh, the mine’s owner, as she hasn’t been seen or heard from in a week. After the last book, I lacked enthusiasm to start this one. However, it turned out to be a complex mystery, one involving all aspects I’ve come to love about this series...a strong sense of place and setting, community conflicts and cultural depth. And, we learn so much about Cork’s past, particularly his parents and extended family, all playing a critical role in the present. The mystery was a serious puzzler with lots of layers and interesting characters. As usual, I found it difficult to stop listening. This is another solid installment in a series that continues to keep me engaged and educated. I’m even getting used to Buck Schirner as the narrator.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I am glad that my Goodread friends led me to this author’s series on detective Cork O’Connor as it satisfies my craving for books that evoke the struggles and rewards of life in particular rural places, in this case the iron mining region of northern Minnesota. A detective story with a good-hearted hero who grew up there opens a great window on the perspectives of characters with divergent roles in the multicultural community, from hardscrabble miners and low-income residents of the town and nea I am glad that my Goodread friends led me to this author’s series on detective Cork O’Connor as it satisfies my craving for books that evoke the struggles and rewards of life in particular rural places, in this case the iron mining region of northern Minnesota. A detective story with a good-hearted hero who grew up there opens a great window on the perspectives of characters with divergent roles in the multicultural community, from hardscrabble miners and low-income residents of the town and nearby Ojibwe reservation to rich mine owners, clergy, and artists. In that role, Cork is challenged with righting wrongs in their conflicts with each other while swimming against the tide of forces that undermine precious traditional values. In this tale, 10th in the series, Cork is no longer sheriff and is working as a private detective while recovering from a loss revealed in a previous book. (Though I experience no problem tuning into Cork with this as a first sampling of the author, this will spoil the drama of prior book for me or anyone else jumping in with this one). The mine owner Cavanaugh hires Cork to find his missing art dealer sister on the same day that he is tapped to help investigate anonymous threats against the partners in a scheme to use an old mine for storing nuclear waste. These cases collide with the past when a set of women’s bodies are discovered in a secret wildcatter’s tunnel linking the reservation with the old mine. When Cork’s work helps link the bodies to disappearances his father investigated as a sheriff 40 years in the past, his detective efforts lead him to pursue a painful digging into the lives of his own family, including those of his Ojibwe mother and tribal members who nurtured him as a boy. O’Connor’s father is the fount of his core values: Cork’s father had left a legacy that included a lot of intangibles. The idea that justice is imperative. … That loyalty was the lifeblood of friendship. That the love of family was the deepest root that tapped your heart. But his father’s failure to solve the case of the Vanishings so long ago darkens his memory. Cork comes to feel his father’s medicine man friend Henry Melroux must know something to elucidate the mysteries that now come to haunt him, but all he gets from him is more mystery: “I need answers.” “No, you want answers,” Meloux said, “Need is a different animal.” …“The truth is not hidden, Corcoran O’Connor. It has never been hidden. You simply are not yet ready to see it.” At a later point Meloux gives him his grandmother’s bracelet, and his query as to why reaps the answer: To remind you. Like the beads of that bracelet, all things are connected. The past, the present, the future. One long, beautiful work from the hand of Kitchimanidoo. You, me, those who have gone before us, and those who come after, we are all connected in that creation. No one is ever truly lost to us. Like a Zen-master, Melroux gives Cork another riddle, which devils him until he eventually resolves the cases: In every human being, there are two wolves. One wolf is love, from which all that is good in life comes: generosity, forgiveness, acceptance, peace. The other is fear, which creates all that is destructive: greed, hatred, prejudice, violence. These two wolves are always fighting. I am hooked on the great characters and story-telling in this series and look forward to properly delving into earlier entries from this talented author.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Rather than go on again about how much I love Krueger’s writing, setting, and most of all his characters, I’m going to instead offer some excerpts which I believe demonstrate the spiritual vitality and wonderful imagery that are unfailingly contained within the pages of his books. In Cork’s experience there was nothing to compare with sunrise in the North Country. Across any lake on a calm morning, the crawl of the sun played out twice: first in the vault of heaven and again on the surface of t Rather than go on again about how much I love Krueger’s writing, setting, and most of all his characters, I’m going to instead offer some excerpts which I believe demonstrate the spiritual vitality and wonderful imagery that are unfailingly contained within the pages of his books. In Cork’s experience there was nothing to compare with sunrise in the North Country. Across any lake on a calm morning, the crawl of the sun played out twice: first in the vault of heaven and again on the surface of the water, which was like a window opened onto another heaven at his feet. Five decades of life and he could still be stunned to silence by such a dawn. *** As he knelt to drink, he saw a huge bird, a great blue heron, gliding over the lake, which was glass smooth and mirror perfect. The reflection of the bird crossed the reflection of the sky. Slowly, gracefully, the heron descended. In the mirror of the lake, its other self rose, and in a brief moment of rippling water, the two met. With a powerful sweep of wing, the great bird rose again and the other descended, and in a minute the sky and lake were clear again. The ripple of their meeting spread outward, however, and where Cork knelt at the lake’s edge, the water undulated gently. *** ”Like the beads of that bracelet, all things are connected. The past, the present, the future. One long, beautiful work from the hand of Kitchimanidoo. You, me, those who have gone before us, and those who come after, we are all connected in that creation. No one is ever truly lost to us.” If you enjoy character-driven mystery series, do yourself a favor and try Cork O’Connor, which begins with Iron Lake. Although you can enjoy these books without starting at the beginning, there is a lot of character development that happens along the way and really enhances the experience.

  5. 5 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: Some nights, Corcoran O’Connor dreams his father’s death. Max Cavanagh owns several mines, one of which is being studied by the Department of Energy as a possible site to store nuclear waste. In addition to protests causing Cavanagh worry, his sister, Lauren, has gone missing. Cork, hired to find her, does so but she is not alone. He locates her body in, what had been a closed off section of the mine, among five skeletons. The five skeletons are those of women known as “The Vanish First Sentence: Some nights, Corcoran O’Connor dreams his father’s death. Max Cavanagh owns several mines, one of which is being studied by the Department of Energy as a possible site to store nuclear waste. In addition to protests causing Cavanagh worry, his sister, Lauren, has gone missing. Cork, hired to find her, does so but she is not alone. He locates her body in, what had been a closed off section of the mine, among five skeletons. The five skeletons are those of women known as “The Vanishings” who had disappeared decades ago, and two of the bodies contain bullets fired from the gun of Cork’s late father. Recently, I was involved in a discussion of prologues and how many of us are either annoyed by them or ignore them completely. It takes a writer as skilled as Krueger to write a prologue which contains an important thread which runs through the story. This is not a prologue to ignore. Krueger has become one of my favorite authors. His skill with description take what could be a fairly ordinary scene, but instead comes alive with clear, visual images. We are able to go where the author takes us and be a part of that which is described to us. Even from those scenes where we might prefer to look away, we can’t. That doesn’t mean he is graphically violent; he’s not. It is more that we feel the emotion of the scene and, thereby, understand it. Because I read first for character is another reason why Krueger’s writing appeals to me. He creates dimensional, interesting, relatable characters. I’ll admit I wasn’t particularly happy with the events of the previous book, “Heaven’s Keep,” but the transition to this book has been very effectively and tastefully handled and I now understand the purpose of those events. Cork’s heritage is half Irish, responsible for his impatience and occasional anger, and half Ojibwa, which connects him to the people on the reservation, Indian history, and my favorite character Henry Meloux. It also provides the link to the mystical element in each book. Before you walk away saying “I don’t like woo-woo,” wait. Mysticism and the spirit world are part of the Indian culture. They are also part--along with several other themes including that of what do we really know of our parents and the definition of evil--of what takes this book, and this series, beyond the normal and elevates it into something that makes you stop, think and consider. Krueger is a very fine author who knows how to create characters, write dialogue, set a scene and, most of all, develop a plot. The story continually builds upon itself. It’s a twisty road filled complete with suspense, emotion and startling revelations. I despise the cliché of “If you’ve not read this author yet, read him now,” yet that is the way I feel. Even if you don’t, be assured I shall be reading his next book as soon as it comes out. VERMILION DRIFT (PI-Cork O’Connor-Minnesota-Cont) – Ex Krueger, William Kent – 10th in series Atria, ©2010, ARC – Hardcover ISBN: 9781439153840

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    Rating: 4 STARS (Review Not on Blog) Listened to on audio I am still reeling from the last book, but this is a perfect book to help you get past it. This book blends current murders with cold cases - and Cork's past. We get to see what his parents were like when Cork was a preteen. I enjoyed this one and found myself just racing through it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    In the continuing story of Cork O'Connor's life, this book finds him stopped at a crossroads. He is at a loss and has to decide which direction he must take. Before that can happen, Cork's past catches up. He learns things about his childhood and his family that must be understood before he can move on. This was an excellent addition to the series, and I'm anxious to see what happens next.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    A perfect blend of good and evil in this one. Light and dark forces fight for control of everyone and every issue. Best in the series so far.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Glenna Pritchett

    This is a great series, and this particular book was especially good. I enjoyed finding out more about Cork's early life and his relationship with his father. Moving on to #11! :-)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I wasn't sure how easy this book would be to read after events in the previous book. I shouldn't have been concerned. The mystery was just as compelling as the previous books.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Extremely enjoyable read - one of those that is surprisingly quick because the author's style is very narrative and approachable -- the kind of book you read out of pure pleasure for a story well told, with just enough twists to keep you interested. Although Krueger mentions in the author's notes that he took some liberties with geography, I feel like I learned a bit about a part of the country, and a way of life that I scarcely knew existed. The hero's balancing act between the world of the mod Extremely enjoyable read - one of those that is surprisingly quick because the author's style is very narrative and approachable -- the kind of book you read out of pure pleasure for a story well told, with just enough twists to keep you interested. Although Krueger mentions in the author's notes that he took some liberties with geography, I feel like I learned a bit about a part of the country, and a way of life that I scarcely knew existed. The hero's balancing act between the world of the modern Native American and the white man who lives in close contact with them is a fascinating cultural study in and of itself, and Kreusger manages to be realistic yet still very respectful of ways and customs that we can never fully understand. This is the first of Krueger's work I have read, and I eagerly anticipate reading more.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    The 10th in the Cork O’Connor murder/mystery series introduces the role mining played in Northern Minnesota in decades past, triggering memories of my own. As a teenager in the 60s, I recall the huge iron ore carriers loading taconite in Marquette, Michigan. It takes a special sort of person to work in the dark tunnels of the underground mines. On an unrelated investigation, Cork stumbles on five skeletons and a newly murdered body in one of those dark tunnels called the Vermilion Drift. And befo The 10th in the Cork O’Connor murder/mystery series introduces the role mining played in Northern Minnesota in decades past, triggering memories of my own. As a teenager in the 60s, I recall the huge iron ore carriers loading taconite in Marquette, Michigan. It takes a special sort of person to work in the dark tunnels of the underground mines. On an unrelated investigation, Cork stumbles on five skeletons and a newly murdered body in one of those dark tunnels called the Vermilion Drift. And before you know it, Cork O’Connor, as a private investigator, is burrowing into the case of the ‘Vanishings’ that took place over 40 years ago, and the current murder as well. Four of the six victims were Ashtinabe Native Americans. Cork knew some of them as a teenager, causing him to remember that his father (the sheriff at the time) was deeply troubled by the Vanishings case. Why? Henry Meloux, the medicine man, is now in his 90s and Cork seeks his counsel to unravel the questions in his mind. Healing happens in the sweat lodge. [Krueger does an excellent job in describing this cultural tradition.] And this is what I like about Krueger’s Cork O’Connor series—blending modern police methods with the spiritualism of Native American traditions. Recommend.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carl Brookins

    Authors of crime fiction, like authors working in any other genre, often use their talents to work through personal issues, sometimes intensely private issues. Although it is not entirely clear, the writer may be working through some family issues with this novel. Does that matter? Perhaps. That depends on the result. In this case, the author, possessed of well-honed, significant writing talent, has produced a novel of finely wrought proportions, multi-layered with considerable depth. By that I m Authors of crime fiction, like authors working in any other genre, often use their talents to work through personal issues, sometimes intensely private issues. Although it is not entirely clear, the writer may be working through some family issues with this novel. Does that matter? Perhaps. That depends on the result. In this case, the author, possessed of well-honed, significant writing talent, has produced a novel of finely wrought proportions, multi-layered with considerable depth. By that I mean that the characters demonstrate multiple levels of engagement, and the story itself works on more than one level. Almost every character who appears in the book is involved in the story in more than one way. Some of their levels are casual or socially related, such as what may be routinely expected of law officers in Tamarack County, the Northern Minnesota location of this novel. Other characters, Henry Meloux, for example and other Native Americans; Sam Wintermoon, appears, and of course, Cork’s mother and his father, Liam, all have, at different times, visceral involvement in the story. The problem, if there is one, is that this story is much more a novel of family and community relationships than it is a novel of suspense, or crime, horrific and awful though the crimes were. Death is always the ultimate judge, from whom there is no appeal. So, in my view, the problem is one of balance, or perhaps of categorization. The involvement of Cork O’Connor, now a private investigator, alone in Aurora, is mostly one of self-examination. The novel is one of Cork’s journey of discovery. What was the meaning of his occasional nightmares? What were the issues that consumed and separated the O’Connor family in those last fateful months of Liam O’Connor’s life? The novel begins with Cork once again at odds with his Ojibwe heritage. His mother, remember, was a member of the tribe. He’s hired by the owners of the Vermilion One and Ladyslipper mines to deal with threats against the mine. But then he’s also tasked to try to locate a missing woman, sister of the mine owner. Lauren Cavanaugh has gone missing. Finding the missing woman opens a window on old unsolved crimes from a previous generation, from a time when Cork’s father was the sheriff of Tamarack County. Sorting through old albums, records and memories, fresh and repressed, takes up the body of the novel As with all of this author’s previous novels, the explanation is logical, satisfying and meaningful. Krueger, as always, is skillful in evoking the landscape, not just its physical self, but its atmosphere, its mystical presence and its influences on the people who reside there. In the end, this thoughtful exploration of law, truth and justice and their profound

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christy Lockstein

    Vermilion Drift by William Kent Krueger is the tenth book in the Cork O'Connor series. Cork is still recovering after his wife Jo's murder and is feeling a bit lost as all of his three children are far from home. No longer sheriff of Tamarack County, Minnesota, he's now a private investigator, hired to look into threats against an old iron mine that the government is considering as storage for nuclear waste. The local Ojibwa consider him to be betraying his own blood by working on a case that wi Vermilion Drift by William Kent Krueger is the tenth book in the Cork O'Connor series. Cork is still recovering after his wife Jo's murder and is feeling a bit lost as all of his three children are far from home. No longer sheriff of Tamarack County, Minnesota, he's now a private investigator, hired to look into threats against an old iron mine that the government is considering as storage for nuclear waste. The local Ojibwa consider him to be betraying his own blood by working on a case that will damage the environment, but things get suddenly much worse when while searching the mine tunnel known as Vermilion Drift, he discovers six bodies, five of whom have been dead for over forty years, but one is the body of a woman he had just been hired to find. Even worse, two of the bodies were killed by a bullet that came from Cork's gun, the one he inherited from his father, another former Tamarack County sheriff. While there is lots of history in this superb mystery, it's not necessary to have read the previous books in the series (although after reading this, I certainly want to), because Krueger expertly weaves Cork's personal history with that of the town. He has a different personality from most detectives; while he does have the usual tendency of going rogue, he's more interested in talking to people and discovering truth than he is meting out personal justice. There are lots of twists and turns as well as red herrings to keep readers guessing and second guessing, and the resolution is satisfying and provides some long-term healing for Cork. Vermilion Drift is suspenseful without being overtly violent, and intelligent without being pretentious. It's a literary mystery with a stand-out hero.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Georganna

    Another trip to the Northland with Cork O'Connor. I like how these stories weave the grit and beauty of that country into the mysteries Cork encounters. Makes me miss trees.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Former sheriff Cork O'Connor is hired to look for Lauren Cavanaugh by her brother, Max. Cork is reluctant to take the case because he is still numb after his wife's murder. However, he eventually accepts the case. Max owns the Great North Mining Company and tells Cork that his sister his been missing for a week. One of the deepest mines in the company is Vermilion One. It is being considered as a dumping site for nuclear waste and is causing heated protests among the locals. After meeting with mine Former sheriff Cork O'Connor is hired to look for Lauren Cavanaugh by her brother, Max. Cork is reluctant to take the case because he is still numb after his wife's murder. However, he eventually accepts the case. Max owns the Great North Mining Company and tells Cork that his sister his been missing for a week. One of the deepest mines in the company is Vermilion One. It is being considered as a dumping site for nuclear waste and is causing heated protests among the locals. After meeting with mine officials, Max shows Cork something that was spray-painted in the mine, "We die, you die." Since no one saw the person who did the sign, Cork assumes that there is another entrance to the mine. While he is deep in the mine, looking for this entrance, he finds a secret room with six bodies. Five of the bodies have been there for many years but one is only recently placed there. This reminds Cork of The Vanishings. In 1964, two young Indian American girls vanished and then a young white woman, Monique Cavanaugh, who is Lauren's mother. In a story deep with Indian folk lore, Cork speaks to his ancient friend, Henry Meloux. Despite Henry's advanced age, he can sense things and tells Cork who to speak to in order to identify the other woman who went missing so long ago. He also tells Cork that things are stirred up on the reservation. It is interesting that Cork's father was the sheriff when the vanishings took place. It creates a moral dilemma for Cork to consider if his father could have been involved. As always with William Kent Krueger, there are details about the Ojibwe culture and beliefs. He adds them to the story to make it that much more interesting. Cork is a well described character who the reader becomes fond of and who we want to see succeed in putting the pieces of the mystery together.

  17. 5 out of 5

    S.D.

    Cork O’Connor is now a P.I. and hired to locate Lauren Cavanaugh, the sister of Max Cavanaugh who owns the Vermillion mine. The Department of Energy is scoping out the mine as a possible storage place for nuclear waste which has the Natives protesting. When six bodies are found in a closed section of the mine, it is discovered that one is a current death and could be Lauren. What complicates matters is that both Lauren and one victim who died in 1964, were killed by the same gun, Cork’s gun, one Cork O’Connor is now a P.I. and hired to locate Lauren Cavanaugh, the sister of Max Cavanaugh who owns the Vermillion mine. The Department of Energy is scoping out the mine as a possible storage place for nuclear waste which has the Natives protesting. When six bodies are found in a closed section of the mine, it is discovered that one is a current death and could be Lauren. What complicates matters is that both Lauren and one victim who died in 1964, were killed by the same gun, Cork’s gun, one that his father had given to him but which he gave to his friend Henry to dispose of in a previous book. Cork is looking for answers but Henry isn’t too forthcoming which leads Cork to read some of his mother’s diary. Cork wonders if his father wasn’t quite the upstanding officer everyone thought he was. Henry is hiding something, friends on the reservation are hiding something, and someone is leaving threatening notes for the DE representative and anyone in favor of the dumping. But Cork is none too innocent either because when the sheriff turns to him for help, Cork isn’t too forthcoming with information he discovers. I had mentioned in the previous book that Cork needed to spend a week with Jack (either Bauer or Reacher) because this aversion to weapons in his line of work just isn’t going to cut it. He needs to “man up.” With VERMILLION DRIFT, Cork has grown a pair. Unfortunately, they are on Henry’s niece, Rainy. She is a welcome addition as she tends to her ailing uncle. She takes zip from Cork and one can only assume there might be some future with the two. In resolving the murders, Cork realizes there are some secrets better left unsaid.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brent Soderstrum

    I am a big fan of William Kent Krueger and his Cork O'Conner series. This is the 10th installment to that series and Krueger continues to spin fascinating tales. This one starts out kind of slow. Maybe it was the description of the mining of iron ore in northern Minnesota that drug for me. The first 100 pages were not up to Krueger's normal fare. He certainly makes up for it in the final 100 pages though. Krueger hits on the actions of a diabolical killer and abuser from Cork's past. Cork has to I am a big fan of William Kent Krueger and his Cork O'Conner series. This is the 10th installment to that series and Krueger continues to spin fascinating tales. This one starts out kind of slow. Maybe it was the description of the mining of iron ore in northern Minnesota that drug for me. The first 100 pages were not up to Krueger's normal fare. He certainly makes up for it in the final 100 pages though. Krueger hits on the actions of a diabolical killer and abuser from Cork's past. Cork has to go where no one would ever want to go to solve the mystery-his own past and actions his father took days before he was killed. Bodies are found in a mine shaft-four that have been there over 40 years and one recent. One of the older bodies was shot by a gun owned by Cork. So was the most recent victim. The four older bodies had disappeared when Cork was 13 in what everyone called "the Vanishings". Cork is hired by the owner of the mine to find out what happened to his missing sister who is later found to be the most recent victim. What a great series. Start from the beginning because getting a background on Cork will help you see what he is going through in this book. Not as much in this book about Cork's family since the kids are away for the summer and Jo, his wife being killed in the previous book. I am looking forward to seeing what Krueger will do with Cork's personal life in the upcoming books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Branich

    Cork O'Connor, former city cop local sheriff, and now PI, is hired by Max Cavanaugh, the owner of the iron mines in the area, to find his missing sister. At the same time, protests are going on to prevent Max and the government from using an old mine us as storage for nuclear waste. The majority of the protesters are Native Americans from the reservation right next to the mines. Written threats begin to turn up, and when Cork discovers an old hidden and closed up tunnel with several bodies in it, Cork O'Connor, former city cop local sheriff, and now PI, is hired by Max Cavanaugh, the owner of the iron mines in the area, to find his missing sister. At the same time, protests are going on to prevent Max and the government from using an old mine us as storage for nuclear waste. The majority of the protesters are Native Americans from the reservation right next to the mines. Written threats begin to turn up, and when Cork discovers an old hidden and closed up tunnel with several bodies in it, the local sheriff asks him to help out. One of the bodies found is Max's missing sister, but the others could be people that went missing forty years ago. Both the sister and another body have bullets in them fired by the same gun. Is that other body Max's mother? Did the bullets come from Cork's father's gun, which is missing? Was there an evil Windigo with insatiable appetite in the area? Does Cork need to dig out some forgotten memories of his own and face his own demons? What does Henry Meloux, a 90-year old Native American healer know? This was quite a page-turner. Every chapter raises more questions, until the reader realizes the horror of what happened.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Cork O'Connor is contacted by the owner of a huge iron ore mining site to help locating his sister. Shortly after starting his investigation Cork is made aware of some writings on one of the mines shafts so he arranges with one of the managers to check it out. During the trip through a mine tunnel he finds a portion of wall that has been made impassable, they clear the blockage and find a group of bodies. It is discovered these bodies went back many years to a series of women who just disappeare Cork O'Connor is contacted by the owner of a huge iron ore mining site to help locating his sister. Shortly after starting his investigation Cork is made aware of some writings on one of the mines shafts so he arranges with one of the managers to check it out. During the trip through a mine tunnel he finds a portion of wall that has been made impassable, they clear the blockage and find a group of bodies. It is discovered these bodies went back many years to a series of women who just disappeared, it was referred to as the vanishings. Cork is also asked to assist the sheriff on this murder site. The trails he follows, the investigations, the discoveries of his own past, the unknowns of many citizens, all drive one to continue reading until the book is finished. Even then you wish it could continue. There is so much that could be written in a review but not without revealing what you should enjoy reading first hand.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    Fantastic! Okay, I'm officially a Krueger fan! This was my first Krueger book that I picked up after some great reviews I read and I must admit, I was fascinated from page 1. The writing is superb - fast-paced, suspenseful, the perfect recipe for some good ol' mystery reading! Read it in 2 days. What I'm finding I love from a good mystery writer is that the story isn't dumbed down like so many mysteries are today. The writing here is witty, filled with clever puns and well-hidden (or not) irony. Fantastic! Okay, I'm officially a Krueger fan! This was my first Krueger book that I picked up after some great reviews I read and I must admit, I was fascinated from page 1. The writing is superb - fast-paced, suspenseful, the perfect recipe for some good ol' mystery reading! Read it in 2 days. What I'm finding I love from a good mystery writer is that the story isn't dumbed down like so many mysteries are today. The writing here is witty, filled with clever puns and well-hidden (or not) irony. It made me smile as if to say "aha Mr. Krueger, I found your funny little quirky habits in your writing!" it was a great story, felt mildly educated reading it and through his wonderfuly use of imagery I could easily envision the town, characters, etc. despite never having read a "Cork" book before. Just a wonderful way to spend 2 days recuping from surgery... totally took my mind off my knee pain! : ) I'm hooked!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dorie

    *** WARNING -- SOME SPOILERS FOR PREVIOUS BOOKS IN THIS SERIES *** Another great entry in the series. This one covers a serial killer who was active over 40 years ago when Cork was a teenager. The disappearances of his victims were known as "The Vanishings". Now Cork has discovered where the bodies are, and there is a new victim. This book was really different in that Cork was living alone, which hasn't been the case since 'Iron Mountain', the first book in the series. I liked the fact that he was *** WARNING -- SOME SPOILERS FOR PREVIOUS BOOKS IN THIS SERIES *** Another great entry in the series. This one covers a serial killer who was active over 40 years ago when Cork was a teenager. The disappearances of his victims were known as "The Vanishings". Now Cork has discovered where the bodies are, and there is a new victim. This book was really different in that Cork was living alone, which hasn't been the case since 'Iron Mountain', the first book in the series. I liked the fact that he was reevaluating his life and his purpose without having his family around. As usual Cork becomes deeply involved in the investigation and the outcome was carefully plotted, if not entirely surprising. Another great book in a consistently fine series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kitty

    In mining a vertical tunnel is called a "sink" and a horizontal tunnel is a "drift". This is an iron ore min in Minnesota that is being considered for nuclear waste storage. The Ojibwe tribe is up in arms. When graffiti is discovered inside the mine, PI Cork is asked to look for a second entrance. During this trip he finds 4 ancient corpses and 1 fresh one. His investigation takes him back to the time when his father was sheriff there. Could his father have known something about this? During Cor In mining a vertical tunnel is called a "sink" and a horizontal tunnel is a "drift". This is an iron ore min in Minnesota that is being considered for nuclear waste storage. The Ojibwe tribe is up in arms. When graffiti is discovered inside the mine, PI Cork is asked to look for a second entrance. During this trip he finds 4 ancient corpses and 1 fresh one. His investigation takes him back to the time when his father was sheriff there. Could his father have known something about this? During Corck's childhood he was estranged at times from his now late father. Did he have a dark side?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    May be the best Cork O'Connor mystery yet! An artful blend of a current murder tale in Tamarack County blended with family history and memory of horrific events from 40+ years ago. Picked up a signed copy at the Plainview Public Library where William Kent Krueger was speaking as part of SELCO's fall author tour of Minnesota Book Award (MNBA) winners. Vermillion Drift had just made the New York Times best seller list and I hope this will put in in the running for another MNBA award.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eadie

    William Kent Krueger is the best storyteller ever. All of his books are so engaging and full of surprises. This book has a touch of the supernatural which makes the story even more intriguing. The characters are well developed and you can feel their emotions. It was another definite page turner and the ending did not disappoint but left me wanting more. I will be reading the next in the series very soon.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    A very good and well written novel, the author does a good job of developing the series following the previous novel. The plot provides very interesting background to Cork's parents and as always fascinating insight into current and prevous customs / traditions of Native American Ojibwe group. Well recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jacque

    Another awesome book from William Kent Krueger.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Phil Griffin

    Another great mystery with a twist I did not see coming.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily Cullen

    Another great book in the Corcoran O'Connor mystery/thriller series by William Kent Krueger. All of his books are great but this story really had my attention. I highly recommend the entire series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Harry

    William Kent Krueger's Cork O'OConnor series comprise a series of stories set in Aurora Minnesota, an area of the country of which I'm blatantly ignorant. Frankly, in reading the reviews of this setting I managed to barely stifle a yawn. Small town mysteries set in a frozen wasteland? With boring backgrounds that involve Indian supernatural folklore - I don't stomach mysteries that resort to such subterfuge, avoid beyond this world explanations when the genre is detective/mystery, decry irration William Kent Krueger's Cork O'OConnor series comprise a series of stories set in Aurora Minnesota, an area of the country of which I'm blatantly ignorant. Frankly, in reading the reviews of this setting I managed to barely stifle a yawn. Small town mysteries set in a frozen wasteland? With boring backgrounds that involve Indian supernatural folklore - I don't stomach mysteries that resort to such subterfuge, avoid beyond this world explanations when the genre is detective/mystery, decry irrational explanations of the crime which to me defeat the whole purpose of reading the damn book (unless of course you are Michael Gruber and you're reading the Jimmy Paz series - yeah, I'll read anything Gruber puts out there!) - boring red neck characters (is there such a thing as a Minnesota red neck?), small town corruption and politics, incompetent forensics and pathologists, petty motivations,and what not. Needless to say, I wasn't thrilled. And yet: In 2005 and 2006, Krueger won back to back Anthony Awards for best novel - a feat only matched by one other writer since the award's inception. Normally, as this essay so eloquently states, I don't ascribe to popularity, or the NYT Best Sellers list as those manuscripts inevitably disappoint but where it comes to mystery/detective awards, the final vote is usually something I can go for. And, as I was in a hurry and needed something to download to my Kindle, fully prepared to read yet another book full of flat characters, resigned myself to boring ethnographic descriptions, I said: "Screw it, let's give Mr. Krueger a try." I found myself marveling at this author's delicate handling and knowledge of the very thing that made me not want to read it: The spiritual undertones and affectations that guide human beings (which I am interested in) but that can come loose at the seams when bordering on superstition and surreal explorations. That he does this through the juxtaposition of Catholicism and the folklore and beliefs of the Anishinaabeg, or "Original People", and that he does so by fusing that carefully within the storyline so that it never seems gratuitous, over played, or cause the outcome to be dependent on irrationality is masterful. Nice! As Mr. Krueger says: "In the mysteries that I write, I often deal with the whole question of the spiritual journey. It’s always intrigued me. I’ve never believed in the Christian view of heaven. But I certainly believe in eternal life. It’s a belief that goes back to a black and white film I saw in a grungy movie theater when I was too young for all the esoteric considerations of the afterlife. It’s amazing, isn’t it, the things that can change your life." In terms of the Anishinaabeg Mr. Krueger is careful to not enforce the stereotype to which most have come to: [...]If you read my stories, please don’t read them as ethnography. The Anishinaabeg are far more complex culturally, rich historically, and textured spiritually, than I will ever be able to adequately portray in my writing. But if I’m able to give you a sense of the admiration I feel for them, then I’ve succeeded. This book reminds me of my boyhood heroes. In the Netherlands where I was born, it wasn't cops and robbers we played while kids:it was cowboy and indians; my fictional heroes were Winnetou and Old Shatterhand a YA series published in the Netherlands but not available in the states. Krueger manages to convey the Native American culture spanning centuries, on into modern day America, in such a way so as to recall my boyhood dreams. There are terrifying moments, men bound to trees and being tortured, honor among killers, and dishonor and deceit within ordinary people. As to Cork O'Connor the hero in this series. As most who read my reviews know, I thoroughly enjoy the loner as heroic, a man or woman who understands that despite social conventions (often designed to hide facing this) man is essentially alone, a creature running around on this planet with (hopefully) purpose. And, as most also know, I despise flat characters (Vince Flynn comes to mind - sorry, Leon!). Cork is the former, not the latter. As a father I understand the inexplicable guilt one feels towards one's children upon facing divorce. And as a father I have come to admire, as Cork does, the resiliency children have to overcome such a situation and make the best of it (far better managed than us adults!). Everything is about juxtaposition. Cork O'Conner is a man who believes in justice, not as meted out by often corrupt law enforcement, but the justice of not denying reality, the justice of truth. When Cork sets his mind to resolving a mystery that to others seems clear cut, ready to be put to rest, he is like a rabid dog unwilling to lessen the vice like grip of his jaws no matter what the consequences to himself and those he loves. We feel his struggle with morality, his disappointment with an almighty being, and yet feel his empirical longing for a peace that the world has consigned to other worldly systems. Cork is, forever, the man in between. The plot is superb. The writing carefully edited so as to give us a straight mystery detective while infusing us with a pleasurable knowledge of Aurora, it's inhabitants, and the evil that belies even the most tranquil of locations. Yeah, I liked it! And, the usual disclaimer, if you've read this review of one of the O'Connor series, you've read 'em all. Good reading!

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