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Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism
Author: Mary Daly
Publisher: Published November 12th 1990 by Beacon Press (first published 1978)
ISBN: 9780807014134
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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This revised edition includes a New Intergalactic Introduction by the Author. Mary Daly's New Intergalactic Introduction explores her process as a Crafty Pirate on the Journey of Writing Gyn/Ecology and reveals the autobiographical context of this "Thunderbolt of Rage" that she first hurled against the patriarchs in 1979 and no hurls again in the Re-Surging Movement of Radi This revised edition includes a New Intergalactic Introduction by the Author. Mary Daly's New Intergalactic Introduction explores her process as a Crafty Pirate on the Journey of Writing Gyn/Ecology and reveals the autobiographical context of this "Thunderbolt of Rage" that she first hurled against the patriarchs in 1979 and no hurls again in the Re-Surging Movement of Radical Feminism in the Be-Dazzling Nineties. Theologian/philosopher Daly (The Church & the 2nd Sex, Rev. '75; Beyond God the Father, '73) has written "an extremist book...on the edge of a culture that is killing itself." Conceived as a radical feminist "Voyage" of woman becoming herself, it's made up of three "Passages." The 1st denounces the reversals & deceptions ("mind pollution") of patriarchal disciplines (including "Godfather" theology) & exuberantly sets out to "discover" the true "Croneology" behind that male mystification. The 2nd, "the most somber part of the Journey," analyzes Goddess-murder (and the murder of the Goddess in every woman) thru the "Sado-Rituals" of five specific historic atrocities: Indian suttee, Chinese footbinding, African genital mutilation, European witchburning, & American gynecology & psychotherapy (gynecology of the mind practiced by the-rapists). Following this "exorcism," the Voyager moves in the 3rd Passage to the Otherworld of lesbian-feminist Spinsters who successfully scorn patriarchal intimidation ("Spooking"), stir "the fire of female friendship" ("Sparking"), &--after a rip-roaring "Unraveling" gotterdammerung--joyously spin on as Revolting Hags. En route Daly purposefully busts out of some traditional (male) forms & language. Altho the word-work of the "living/verbing writer" sometimes gets in the way/weigh of flashing in-sights, a painstaking indictment of scholarly "erasure" of historic events & some bone-chilling facts of women's story, Daly's excursion is bound to inspire Spinsters/Spider Women everywhere & to leave just about everyone else haggard & in-fury-ated.--Kirkus (edited)

30 review for Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tony duncan

    This book really got me off my ass about feminism. it was the most extreme analysis I had ever read about the oppression of woman. It is this type of thinking that I think helped fuel the backlash against feminism. NOT because it was wrong ( though I think some things were exaggerated or not quite true) but because it so accurately reflect how deep the psychological underpinnings of patriarchy operate. And how most woman, who swear they are feminist are unaware of behaviors and attitudes that re This book really got me off my ass about feminism. it was the most extreme analysis I had ever read about the oppression of woman. It is this type of thinking that I think helped fuel the backlash against feminism. NOT because it was wrong ( though I think some things were exaggerated or not quite true) but because it so accurately reflect how deep the psychological underpinnings of patriarchy operate. And how most woman, who swear they are feminist are unaware of behaviors and attitudes that reflect patriarchal thinking and reinforce oppression it is very post modern in some ways, but very "modern" in others . She is NOT a relativist, and she looks at how language especially frames woman's ability to see their selves as less than fully human. Among other radical ideas, she proposed reinventing a feminist language that would undermine every element of patriarchy in relations between woman. She was very much for segregating men and woman NOT because of an innate hostility, but because woman NEED to develop their own culture based on strength and wisdom and love without the tainting influence of even the most well meaning men. While I think some for the particulars of her analysis are incomplete, the basic premise seems more important now than ever because so many woman THINK they understand feminism and believe they are liberated. It is almost taken as a given that if you are politically aware and are a lesbian involved in gender issues that you are ;liberated. Daly would both argue that there is much much more to being liberated than ones sexual orientation and political engagement.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brit Mandelo

    While Daly has some fascinating, excellent commentary on religion, patriarchy, and the religion of patriarchy--I cannot get over how nauseatingly transphobic this text is. It is worth reading, I think; it's valuable from a feminist perspective, but it is firmly stuck in the nastiest part of the second wave. It's a constant, awful, nasty thread running through the entire text that "transsexuals" (as she refers to transgender people) are the enemies of women, are not women, and are the tools of pa While Daly has some fascinating, excellent commentary on religion, patriarchy, and the religion of patriarchy--I cannot get over how nauseatingly transphobic this text is. It is worth reading, I think; it's valuable from a feminist perspective, but it is firmly stuck in the nastiest part of the second wave. It's a constant, awful, nasty thread running through the entire text that "transsexuals" (as she refers to transgender people) are the enemies of women, are not women, and are the tools of patriarchy to be expelled and made fun of. It's pretty horrifying. (Also, she repeats constantly that there aren't really any female-to-male trans folks.) So. I don't know how to feel about this book. It has great ideas buried in it, but it also has some astounding bigotry.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rididill

    I would give this 4.5 if I could. I found the first chapters a bit confusing and weird, but perhaps I should read them again now I've got used to the language and the method of analysis. Daly looks at repeating trends and patterns in patriarchal myths and practices across the world, which is radical in every sense. I have often found that much of modern feminism lacks a broad systemic analysis, probably because they are so afraid of being like those second wavers who oppress everybody with their I would give this 4.5 if I could. I found the first chapters a bit confusing and weird, but perhaps I should read them again now I've got used to the language and the method of analysis. Daly looks at repeating trends and patterns in patriarchal myths and practices across the world, which is radical in every sense. I have often found that much of modern feminism lacks a broad systemic analysis, probably because they are so afraid of being like those second wavers who oppress everybody with their totalizing narratives that every pomo feminist rushes to demonize in their first paragraph. Honestly I don't think broad narratives have to be interpreted in this way. It is in the nature of any theory that it is an abstraction from a reality which is infinitely varied. Language itself does this; it will always be an approximation. I prefer to look at such theories as like ideal types - they may not explain everything and they may not even apply to your experience, but this does not mean they have no validity. It gives a framework which links together various phenomena in new ways, and can be used as one of many lenses through which to see the world. I did raise a few eyebrows at how race was dealt with though; she basically dismisses it saying race division is a man's game that keeps us divided and should basically be ignored. This is rather dismissive of WOC's experiences of racial oppression which also takes place between women. On the other hand, Marx makes a similar claim about the working class and no one jumps on him to call him a big racist. Basically her central thesis is about the notion of men trying to usurp the one thing they don't have - women's creative, life-giving power. This is firstly exemplified by childbirth but also including women's caring labor and life-loving (biophilic) creativity. Such power is controlled and harnessed into the death loving patriarchal society. I can't do the ideas justice here but they are very interesting - it lacks an analysis of where this life/death split comes from, i.e. she seems to be saying it's something inherent but does not specifically say if this is because of biology or social conditioning. Given this, her problem with transsexuality makes total sense. If patriarchy is (as she claims) about usurping womanhood and perverting its purposes, particularly in terms of myths of male creators and their Frankenstein creations, the idea that you can create a woman out of surgery and hormones appears a perfect example of this. Particularly given the fact that many transactivists seem to be hell bent on making feminism all about them - thereby not just wanting to become women but to be in a position to speak for women as well. I found her concept of 'reversals' and 'agent deletion' extremely interesting - the latter being something that comes up over and over and over again, never addressed by pomo feminism. Responsibility has gone out of fashion, except for the victims who have 'agency' which we must never 'deny'. I just watched a documentary on violence against native women in Canada, who managed to go almost the entire film without making it clear who the perpetrators of violence were. It transpired that it was actually native men, but this was described in such vague terms that social forces/colonization seemed to cause 'violence' without the people directly enacting such violence ever being mentioned. So it has some weaknesses, but this is clearly not a reason not to read it. I hate the way it has become taboo even to speak her name because of her 'transphobia'. I mean honestly. The founding fathers who wrote the constitution of US were racist, classist, misogynist white rich men. No one seems to think that's a reason to ignore them. As were the majority of Western political theorists. Yet somehow when it's a feminist, anything less than perfect embracement and tolerance of anything anyone might consider 'progressive' is seen as a reason to ignore them completely. Total double standard. The end is also very inspiring, and gets kind of surreal, which is highly necessary as the middle chapters are BRUTAL.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate Pittman

    I don't write a lot of reviews but upon reading some others here, I want to add my voice. I see a lot of people dismissing Mary Daly because they don't agree with her on one point or another. I find this somewhat tragic. She has written here a very important book for feminism that introduced me to some very clarifying concepts I had not previously encountered. She brings it all together so we can see the common ties between as disparate phenomena as FGM in Africa, foot-binding in China, witch bur I don't write a lot of reviews but upon reading some others here, I want to add my voice. I see a lot of people dismissing Mary Daly because they don't agree with her on one point or another. I find this somewhat tragic. She has written here a very important book for feminism that introduced me to some very clarifying concepts I had not previously encountered. She brings it all together so we can see the common ties between as disparate phenomena as FGM in Africa, foot-binding in China, witch burning in Europe, and others. Some of her writing is weird and very 1970s trippy to the modern eye, but sticking with it is worth any irritation that may occur. What I really want to say is that reading any author who was writing in the past, even the recent past, we are going to come up against some ideas that have changed since then and we may be tempted to dismiss the author as out of touch with (our current) reality. I feel this is much more prevalent with feminist writers than anyone else. Readers expect perfection from feminists past in ways they do not expect perfection from other philosophers. And to dismiss Mary Daly out of hand because you've heard that "the second wave is transphobic" is a real shame for young women. One of the biggest problems with feminism is that women of each new generation do not get the chance to discover and read the work that has already been done before and the wheel is constantly being reinvented. Now that we have the internet, there is no reason this situation needs to continue. We can access the work of feminists past any time we want to. A new way to prevent young women from reading the works of the authors of the "first and second wave" is to convince us that these authors are racist or transphobic or basic old biddies who shouldn't be taken seriously. This is tragic. So please, even if you read these texts and disagree with parts of them, think about the life work these women put into their writing, the bravery and courage it took to say these things in the cultural climate of their times, and maybe give them the benefit of the doubt we so readily give male authors of "the classics".

  5. 4 out of 5

    Randy Weled

    Every man needs to read this book if they want to be an ally to woman. This is a difficult read, and men will get very defensive unless they realize that this is statement about the patriarchy rather than an individual; however, just the way our male body is less vulnerable than that of a woman, and has been all throughout time, and that we are physically larger and stronger, "we" have oppressed woman, we have raped, we have disfigured and we, in the form of patriarchy have defined femininity. W Every man needs to read this book if they want to be an ally to woman. This is a difficult read, and men will get very defensive unless they realize that this is statement about the patriarchy rather than an individual; however, just the way our male body is less vulnerable than that of a woman, and has been all throughout time, and that we are physically larger and stronger, "we" have oppressed woman, we have raped, we have disfigured and we, in the form of patriarchy have defined femininity. We have dictated what is moral, and not moral, we have decided what a woman's role in society. "Femininity is a male construct." We are son's and we all have mothers. We need to know what their life has been like. What it is like to feel unsafe walking down the street, and be objectified by most men. What is it like for mostly men (gynecologists) to be probed, invaded and ultimately surgically altered often without choice. We need to know the atrocities that happen to woman all over the world, but not forgetting that these atrocities happen in our own culture. The patriarchy hurts everyone, it hurts every man by dictating roles, ways of being, feelings that are allowed to be felt, attitudes that we are allowed to take. When it wants to humiliate us, it uses its own constructs of femininity to call us names. It uses female body parts to say that we are less than men.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    The section on the skin-crawling origin of the gynecological medical specialty alone is worth the price of the book. Daly's unvarnished and very angry ruminations on patriarchy are very thought-provoking. Casually picking this book up was my introduction to radical feminist thought, and it was like jumping in the deep end for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Ellis

    Spinsters spin all ways, always.

  8. 5 out of 5

    ONTD Feminism

    LJ user recognitions: Okay, I know. Daly was problematic in a million different ways. She was often dismissive of WOC, she was downright contemptuous of trans women and men, and she didn't have much use for the cis brand of men either. Add to that her own idiosyncratic, too-cute-by-half idiomatic language, heavily leaning on wordplay, and it's enough to daunt anyone. But Gyn/Ecology, when you get past all the nonsense, does such a good job looking at the oppressive nature of the patriarchy in man LJ user recognitions: Okay, I know. Daly was problematic in a million different ways. She was often dismissive of WOC, she was downright contemptuous of trans women and men, and she didn't have much use for the cis brand of men either. Add to that her own idiosyncratic, too-cute-by-half idiomatic language, heavily leaning on wordplay, and it's enough to daunt anyone. But Gyn/Ecology, when you get past all the nonsense, does such a good job looking at the oppressive nature of the patriarchy in many different cultures, and the similarities thereof. She was incredibly flawed, but she was out there on her own in a way and a time that very few others were. It's not for everyone, but it sure blew my mind when I read it back in the 20th century.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ruger

    In defense of Mary Daly: I love Gyn/Ecology even if Audre Lorde doesn't. I love Daly's insistence on di-secting words in order to draw out their meanings (some may find it gimmicky). The rest of her published works don't interest me the way Gyn/Ecology does, but I think Ms. Daly is genius. More feminists should read her even if her brand of feminism is out of style.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fausto

    Basically, the BEST book on radical feminism ever written

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    radical feminist theory at its finest

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie Glanz

    This is a compelling and lyrical book. Daly's Gyn/Ecology exposes the insidious beliefs and "customs" of global patriarchy. Daly dives into explorations of misogynist language (and in doing so, manages to give a wag-of-the-finger to Chomsky--a very cool accomplishment in its own right.) She reveals ingenious and insightful woman-centric ways of living, thinking, and existing in this world. The weaknesses in Daly's work include a nasty bit of transphobia, an unabashed tendency to speak for "all wo This is a compelling and lyrical book. Daly's Gyn/Ecology exposes the insidious beliefs and "customs" of global patriarchy. Daly dives into explorations of misogynist language (and in doing so, manages to give a wag-of-the-finger to Chomsky--a very cool accomplishment in its own right.) She reveals ingenious and insightful woman-centric ways of living, thinking, and existing in this world. The weaknesses in Daly's work include a nasty bit of transphobia, an unabashed tendency to speak for "all women," and the treatment of intersectionality (hierarchies of race, class, gender, sexuality, disability, ethnicity, etc...), as non-issues. Addressing these multiple points of oppression could leave the door open for men and other individuals of privilege (Mary Daly herself is a highly educated white woman) to self-consciously acknowledge their privilege, and move forward exposing injustice in all instances.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    I read this book in my 30's and found Daly's unravelling of Patriarchy a huge eye opener. Her outrage and imagination are unmatched in anything else I've read and were positively refreshing. I feel feminist theory is like a banquet - choose from all the food groups for the best nutrition and be as daring as possible in your tastes if you want to do more than survive - to thrill your pallet. What I've eaten at Daly's banquet has continued to serve me well. Here's Daly's Radical Feminism served up I read this book in my 30's and found Daly's unravelling of Patriarchy a huge eye opener. Her outrage and imagination are unmatched in anything else I've read and were positively refreshing. I feel feminist theory is like a banquet - choose from all the food groups for the best nutrition and be as daring as possible in your tastes if you want to do more than survive - to thrill your pallet. What I've eaten at Daly's banquet has continued to serve me well. Here's Daly's Radical Feminism served up with intergalactic sauce. Some people discount her wholesale, because she has some decidedly unsavoury convictions (for one thing she's transphobic) - but I don't think they taint everything she has to offer. In the early 90's my friends and I wrote a Fringe play borrowing heavily (read cut-and-paste) from Gyn/Ecology and influenced by a couple other of Daly's books including her wonderful "Websters' First New Intergalactic Wickedary of the English Language", "Outercourse: The Bedazzling Voyage, Containing Recollections from My Logbook of a Radical Feminist Philosopher" and "Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation". We called it The Happy Cunt and created quite a stir, along with sold-out houses, on the festival circuit.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    I read this immediately upon finishing Daly's Beyond God the Father. It was more difficult and less enjoyable. One difficulty was that she no longer appeared to be addressing me, but only females. My desire is to transcend gender in the sense of approaching an ability to embrace and identify with all possible genderings, not to get into my "maleness" as natively distinct from an antithetical "femaleness". Daly seems to buy into the scheme that there is a real ontological difference and then to c I read this immediately upon finishing Daly's Beyond God the Father. It was more difficult and less enjoyable. One difficulty was that she no longer appeared to be addressing me, but only females. My desire is to transcend gender in the sense of approaching an ability to embrace and identify with all possible genderings, not to get into my "maleness" as natively distinct from an antithetical "femaleness". Daly seems to buy into the scheme that there is a real ontological difference and then to celebrate the one while mocking the supposed other. Another difficulty is that she plays with language, substituting gynogendered neologisms which are supposed to parallel existing androgendered words. I read quickly by habit and it was impossible to do the thinking she was demanding quickly. Consequently, I read in fits and starts, normally for a while, missing a lot of her points, then slowly occasionally in order to ponder what she was trying to do. Finally, I had trouble with her sense of humor. I didn't find it funny.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor Cowan

    Through her writing, Mary Daly mothers those of us whose birth mothers, swallowed by patriarchal religions, eeked out depressed lives. Even today, such forces dogmatically shame and subjugate. Daly examines the manner in which sexist vocabulary shapes injustice which is then rationalized, glossed over or minimized. Gross inequality will continue as long as ignorance naps in the arms of false guarantees and dishonest protection. Thank you, mother Mary! Eleanor Cowan, author of : A History of a Pedo Through her writing, Mary Daly mothers those of us whose birth mothers, swallowed by patriarchal religions, eeked out depressed lives. Even today, such forces dogmatically shame and subjugate. Daly examines the manner in which sexist vocabulary shapes injustice which is then rationalized, glossed over or minimized. Gross inequality will continue as long as ignorance naps in the arms of false guarantees and dishonest protection. Thank you, mother Mary! Eleanor Cowan, author of : A History of a Pedophile's Wife: Memoir of a Canadian Teacher and Writer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    "Gyn/Ecology is about women living, loving, creating our Selves, our cosmos. It is dis-possessing our Selves, inspiriting our Selves, hearing the call of the wild, naming our wisdom, spinning and weaving world tapestries out of genesis and demise. In contrast to gynecology, which depends on fixation and dismemberment, Gyn/Ecology affirms that everything is connected."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Some of the best writing I've ever read. Daly's project here is incredibly central and important for feminism. I am very, very impressed by her writing style--completely apart from the political implications of the work. An explosive attempt at the radical phenomeno-hermeneutical liberation of women. An overall important supplement to any modern work on phenomenological ontology.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz Ellis

    Must read for any feminist - or anyone who has a daughter. From witches to foot binding to female genital mutilation - and for everyone who thinks women do it to and/or for themselves - we have NEVER set the bar by which we are judged.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Michaelides

    Complicated and thought-provoking. I enjoy this book for it's willingness to not play nice; to name misogyny and show the extent of patriarchy. In addition to what others have wisely pointed out (her problematic notions on race and transexualism), I find her theory at time too, well, theoretical. This book certainly has me thinking, and I thank it for that. But, too often I find myself at the end of a chapter wanting her to be more pragmatic. Radical theory is fantastic for starting fantastic ne Complicated and thought-provoking. I enjoy this book for it's willingness to not play nice; to name misogyny and show the extent of patriarchy. In addition to what others have wisely pointed out (her problematic notions on race and transexualism), I find her theory at time too, well, theoretical. This book certainly has me thinking, and I thank it for that. But, too often I find myself at the end of a chapter wanting her to be more pragmatic. Radical theory is fantastic for starting fantastic new lines of discussion and debate and raising one's consciousness, but radical theory has the tendency to become too obtuse, so wrapped up in ideas and alternative realities and wordplay rather than realistic solutions. This is case for me, as I put down Gyn/Ecology.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Maybe this book is somewhat dated now, and somewhat tainted by Daly's overlong plenary address at the American Academy of Religions conference in 1991 or 1992, in which she stole time from the Black feminists who were to follow her, and debunked her essentialism with her whiteness. But when I read it, I suffered under the permanent change it was effecting in me. It really threw me for a loop.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Daly is exceptionally creative. I used some of her methods to sustain my own creative work in my dissertation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This book gave me a tremendous headache, but it's never boring. Daly offers a lot of ideas that some might find outrageous; there's plenty to argue about here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Stevens

    An unbelievable voyage into the passage of women's energy and natural knowing

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Probably read this in 2005.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    It is *incredibly* refreshing to read a woman who has a strong, idiosyncratic (one might even say crackpot and megalomaniac) voice. I breathe easier when I read all those capital letters and invented words. It is *wonderful* to see someone of my own sex who has invented her own system and her own style and is in no doubt as to its importance. It is also wonderful to see someone who takes patriarchy as a problem of primary importance -- not just in "women's issues" but in all social relations. It i It is *incredibly* refreshing to read a woman who has a strong, idiosyncratic (one might even say crackpot and megalomaniac) voice. I breathe easier when I read all those capital letters and invented words. It is *wonderful* to see someone of my own sex who has invented her own system and her own style and is in no doubt as to its importance. It is also wonderful to see someone who takes patriarchy as a problem of primary importance -- not just in "women's issues" but in all social relations. It is a bit less wonderful that she plays loose with the facts. I think she overstates the number of witches burned in the 15th-18th centuries. It is extremely frustrating that, while she points out the enormous seriousness of domestic abuse and rape (and the negative space, the chilling effect that the *fear* of such violence has on women's participation in society), she resolutely refuses to blame any women for committing violence. Abusive mothers are merely victims of the patriarchy. No woman can ever justifiably blame another woman for hurting her. *WHAT?* Surely if we are moral agents we can bear responsibility for the things we literally do! It is also frustrating that she uses technology as an obvious metonym for death and never doubts that it brings death in reality. Technology -- yes, including machines and the dreaded "robots" -- is something I see as a tool primarily for keeping people alive. Because she's writing in a mythic mode, she is constantly eliding the difference between being "roboticized" (dehumanized) vs. actually using or creating technology. And as someone who's been called a robot one too many times -- it pisses me off. [I saw the transphobia coming, but it's there, and it's gross. Mary Daly isn't one to shroud it in politeness.] Spending time inside Daly's head is a wild ride and a great experience, but don't make her your guru. She doesn't hold herself to the standard of "literally" "making" "sense", so it's more a matter of whether her thoughts intuitively resonate, and not all of them do, for me.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

    Very (white) Second Wave (in the worst ways)--transphobic, white supremacist, etc. But some critiques of civic/imperial Christianity hold up.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julia Ashworth

    A real eye-opener to say the least! It's thought-provoking and inspirational. I don't think I'll be able to NOT read between the lines ever again. Thank you, Mary! The only downside for me was that Mary Daly clearly dislikes ALL males. I understand her point of view, but feel that she's being really quite unfair here. Having an X and a Y chromosome doesn't make a man an evil oppressor. There are many truly gentle men out there whose biased views of women isn't their fault any more than it is our A real eye-opener to say the least! It's thought-provoking and inspirational. I don't think I'll be able to NOT read between the lines ever again. Thank you, Mary! The only downside for me was that Mary Daly clearly dislikes ALL males. I understand her point of view, but feel that she's being really quite unfair here. Having an X and a Y chromosome doesn't make a man an evil oppressor. There are many truly gentle men out there whose biased views of women isn't their fault any more than it is ours (many women actually perpetuate male-female stereotypes). They are merely the victims of our patriarchal society's memes, the same as the majority of women are. As mothers, women are the ones that can make a real change. We need to teach our boys (and girls!) that we're all equal, no matter what sex or colour or lifestyle. All's good. The main thing is that we're kind and considerate to one another and treat othes as we want to be treated ourselves. Then the future will be bright. :) Highly recommended read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ramona

    First of all, I am a radical feminist, so this book appealed to me greatly at first glance. However, I found it to be highly far-fetched and cryptic. Daly infused the book with her own made-up language, supposedly toying with grammar and linguistics for intellectual purpose - but the narrative came off as convoluted and difficult to follow. Also, she only addressed a minimal amount of actual feminist issues - such as female genital mutilation and the disproportionate amount of men in the gynecol First of all, I am a radical feminist, so this book appealed to me greatly at first glance. However, I found it to be highly far-fetched and cryptic. Daly infused the book with her own made-up language, supposedly toying with grammar and linguistics for intellectual purpose - but the narrative came off as convoluted and difficult to follow. Also, she only addressed a minimal amount of actual feminist issues - such as female genital mutilation and the disproportionate amount of men in the gynecology field. Unfortunately, the other 75% of the book was spent talking about "Hags" and "Spooking" and other mumbo-jumbo that really made no sense at all. I am highly disappointing in Mary Daly, as a fellow radical feminist, because Gyn/Ecology achieved essentially nothing in terms of a feminist analysis.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book is all about the demythologization of patriarchal history - past and present (and probably a whole lot more that I'm not getting). It is not a book written on eggshells. Mary calls it like she sees it and isn't afraid to name Men as the perpetrators of oppression. I am relating to this book in terms of the myths surrounding mothering and especially birth. I also LOVE how she uses language. She breaks down words to their origin and goes into detail about how the meaning was re-framed to This book is all about the demythologization of patriarchal history - past and present (and probably a whole lot more that I'm not getting). It is not a book written on eggshells. Mary calls it like she sees it and isn't afraid to name Men as the perpetrators of oppression. I am relating to this book in terms of the myths surrounding mothering and especially birth. I also LOVE how she uses language. She breaks down words to their origin and goes into detail about how the meaning was re-framed to hurt women. She also changes spelling around to make different points. Love it. This is a heavy read for me. I bit more dense than I normally like but I'm taking my time with it. Update: I lost interest and stopped reading this years ago. Never finished.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    I don't really agree with Daly's politics (her brand of radical feminism is pretty white, middle class, and cis oriented to say the least), but the way she uses language and mythology here is pretty fascinating to read. Incidentally, her method of finding the positive "back-ground" of terms like crone, hag, trivia, and spinster can also be applied to terms about trans women. Susan Stryker did this in an essay on Frankenstein, in which she reinterpreted the terms "monster" and "creature" which ar I don't really agree with Daly's politics (her brand of radical feminism is pretty white, middle class, and cis oriented to say the least), but the way she uses language and mythology here is pretty fascinating to read. Incidentally, her method of finding the positive "back-ground" of terms like crone, hag, trivia, and spinster can also be applied to terms about trans women. Susan Stryker did this in an essay on Frankenstein, in which she reinterpreted the terms "monster" and "creature" which are often used against trans women. You can also do it with the word "bad," which derives from an Old English word for what we might today call trans women. Just an ironic side note.

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