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How to Train Your Dragon PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: How to Train Your Dragon
Author: Cressida Cowell
Publisher: Published May 1st 2004 by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (first published February 1st 2003)
ISBN: 9780316737371
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

352262.How_to_Train_Your_Dragon.pdf

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Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III is a truly extraordinary Viking hero known throughout Vikingdom as "the Dragon Whisperer"...but it wasn't always so. Travel back to the days when the mighty warrior was just a boy, the quiet and thoughtful son of the Chief of the Hairy Hooligans. Can Hiccup capture a dragon and train it without being torn limb from limb? Join the adventure as Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III is a truly extraordinary Viking hero known throughout Vikingdom as "the Dragon Whisperer"...but it wasn't always so. Travel back to the days when the mighty warrior was just a boy, the quiet and thoughtful son of the Chief of the Hairy Hooligans. Can Hiccup capture a dragon and train it without being torn limb from limb? Join the adventure as the small boy finds a better way to train his dragon and become a hero!

30 review for How to Train Your Dragon

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    I saw the film a while back and really enjoyed it. I bought the book for my daughter Celyn's 9th birthday and read it to her (she's registered blind and couldn't watch the movie). We finished it last week in hospital. She did fall asleep a couple of times but to be fair she was recoving from a general anaesthetic. The book is very different to the film. Both share some comical Vikings and a weedy 'hero' named Hiccup. Both contain dragons. That's about the end of the similarities. In the film the I saw the film a while back and really enjoyed it. I bought the book for my daughter Celyn's 9th birthday and read it to her (she's registered blind and couldn't watch the movie). We finished it last week in hospital. She did fall asleep a couple of times but to be fair she was recoving from a general anaesthetic. The book is very different to the film. Both share some comical Vikings and a weedy 'hero' named Hiccup. Both contain dragons. That's about the end of the similarities. In the film the young Vikings are trained (in a mixed class) to battle dragons. In the book the young Vikings (boys only) own and train dragons. Actually I lie. Hiccup is very similar in character. An outsider at odds with his societal norms. A thinker in a world that's all about fighting. Also as in the film there is a hostile uber-dragon (two in fact) that is truly gargantuan. The book is good fun but a touch too silly for there to be any real emotional connection with the characters - always a minus for me. It has some clever bits, some funny bits, and Celyn and me certainly didn't waste our time reading it. A solid 3* for fun. I would rate the film more highly, and that's a rarity for me. Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes ..

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dana Salman

    2010: Finally, finally! I found it! Boy, where do I start? Okay, to make things clear: I did see the movie first (it was one of Dreamworks' best ever!) but that didn't necessarily mean I had expectations for this book based on that. I did check up on it before reading it, so I was fully prepared with the knowledge that it was completely different from the movie when I started. Still, no matter how much I loved the movie, I loved this book too. The characters are likable (as story-book characters, 2010: Finally, finally! I found it! Boy, where do I start? Okay, to make things clear: I did see the movie first (it was one of Dreamworks' best ever!) but that didn't necessarily mean I had expectations for this book based on that. I did check up on it before reading it, so I was fully prepared with the knowledge that it was completely different from the movie when I started. Still, no matter how much I loved the movie, I loved this book too. The characters are likable (as story-book characters, anyway; I doubt anyone would want to meet a real Gobber the Belch in person) and the idea and plot are original and entertaining. I think this version earns the title of How to Train Your Dragon alot more than the movie; Hiccup, who already isn't real Viking material, is set up to train an impossibly small yet needy, whiney, vain, ungrateful, disobediant, proud, cheeky, self-centered brat of a dragon Toothless (don't let all those adjectives set you off, he's still cute!), which he quickly understands could take alot more than just the simple advise of Yell At It to accomplish. It doesn't matter that he can speak Dragonese; luck just isn't on his side. He'll have to train dragons his own way. The morals of this story are well-delivered. You can tell how Hiccup's methods pay off when, having treated Toothless with kindness and generosity such that no other Viking has, Toothless finally feels grateful enough to help him defeat the Green Death. This book is mainly aimed at nine-and-up-year-old boys, but I bought it for me, and I ended up reading it to my little sister, who enjoyed listening to it and surprisingly was able to overlook the fact that it was nothing at all like the movie she loved. Toothless was still her favorite character (and Hiccup mine!) ***** 2013: I feel like I should update this review, given the amount of likes it's getting, and plus because the above review looks pretty mediocre to me now. Also, since then, I've read (and reread) the rest of the Hiccup books as well. Actually, this will be more like a list of reasons why you should read these books rather than an actual review of this one. So, to get right to it: Reasons to read the How to Train Your Dragon (series) by Cressida Cowell: 1. Our little Hero in Training, the smallish boy with the longish name of Hiccup Horrendous Haddock the Third, is in my opinion one of the sweetest protagonists in literature, alongside Bilbo Baggins, playing the excellent role of reluctant hero. He reminds me a little bit of Jim Hawkins from Treasure Island, although less inclined to thoughts of glory. He's a selfless, modest, polite, and extremely kind little kid just trying to stumble along in doing what's right. And although his overall personality doesn't go through any drastic change as the books progress, it's enjoyable to see his little moments of triumph, when he realizes there is still one last thing he can do. There is some character development in the last few books, when the story starts to get darker and Hiccup grows older, but in the end I like him the way he is. This is the kind of character who makes you smile when he's happy, cry when he cries, get mad when he gets mad, and cheer silently in your head when he stands up after falling. Although the books wouldn't be nearly as enjoyable or funny without his friends, who provide most of the comic relief (although Hiccup himself does make quite a few smart sarcastic comments), Hiccup is the real soul of the series. 2. The fantasy world Hiccup and his friends inhabit is filled with places as fantastic and incredible as they are treacherous. And they're filled with lots, and lots, and lots of dragons, of every shape and size, from the tiny Nanodragons, some of which glow like worms, to the Monstrous Seadragons the size of mountains, that can be found in the depths of the ocean or in dark underground tunnels and caves. The dragons in these books are unlike any other dragons I've read or watched. Oh sure, you'll find the occasional ultimately-smarter,-nobler,-high-and-mightier-than-thou dragon of the old fairy-tales (that conversation with the Green Death was reminiscent of Bilbo's little chat with Smaug), and there are quite a lot of blood-thirsty-no-mercy killing machine dragons equipped with weapons even worse than fire-breath; but the best of the dragons in these books are as distinctive as the human characters they share their world with - the ones that argue, pick a fight, pick on others, pick their noses, smirk, laugh, snort, show off, show up, groan, complain, play tricks, play with their masters, play with each other, and give the occasional helping hand (or claw) in a crisis the humans can't seem to solve on their own. In fact, you could describe these dragons like misbehaved little puppies. The relationship Hiccup has with his own dragon Toothless is one of more than just Master and Beast; it's one of a boy and his pesky younger brother, or a Model-A student and his trouble-maker friend. Mostly it's that of two companions who've been through a lot together and who stick together through thick and thin; not precisely out of loyalty or friendship, but because they wouldn't have it any other way. 3. The story itself is just plain fun to read through. The books start out as seeming completely disconnected, of The Whacky Adventures of So-and-So variety (Amazing World of Gumball? Misadventures of Flapjack? Well, some Cartoon Network show). You might even roll your eyes at the juvenile humor clearly aimed at the nine-and-under-year-olds these books were originally written for. In the last few books, however, everything gets sewn neatly together in ways that'll leave you gobsmacked, and then things start getting a bit more serious (and it's for this reason that, although they may say it's safe to do so, it's best not to read the books out of order, or at least not the last four). But yes, for the most part, How to Train Your Dragon is just great for laugh-out-loud-until-you-cry moments. Even the villains, though mad and dangerous when angry, provide much of the humor. The dragons too, as I've said, are hugely entertaining; besides Toothless, there's One Eye the Sabre-Toothed Driver Dragon who hates humans, or Ziggerastica the self-proclaimed god. Now that I think of it, in regards to the humor part of the series, I'd liken it most to the anime One Piece: it may seem childish in some parts and the characters don't feel like they're taking anything seriously, but when things get nasty they can pull their own, and you find yourself saving your laughs for later. I can think of plenty more reasons if I sit here long enough, but the three I've given provide a nice long essay in themselves, so I'm sure they'll suffice. All that's left to say is that I give this series a strong recommendation. I'm not saying everyone who reads it will like it (the same way, I suppose, that not everyone who watches One Piece for the first time will instantly fall in love with it, although I certainly did), but I think all that matters is your ability to love adventure, to love the characters, and to tap into your inner hero. And if not a hero, there's always at least someone who appreciates heroism somewhere inside you, which is probably why you read books about them in the first place. **** 2014: Hehe, me again. Well of course. So the second movie is out. I have to say, although it was amazing, I'm pretty sure I prefer the first movie better. The first film's poignant moments were treated with more subtlety, and it came off as an overall very charming film without really trying too hard. It's like the directors were so scared of tarnishing its reputation that they decided to take everything that was good about the first film and crank it up to overblown levels of 'epicness', without really paying it the amount of attention it deserved so that all these conflicting elements - comedy, drama, action, cutsey-ness - flowed easily from scene to scene. Anyways... I came up with a fourth reason, haha. You have to read more of this overlong review of a book series that's still probably only being bought because people loved the movie so much (that's me being a hypocrite, la di da da...) So, reason number 4. Despite it being a children's book series, these books don't talk down to kids. And when I say that I don't only mean that the narrative is surprisingly very adult, using normal literary vocabulary rather than over-simplified written-like-you-say-it kid-speak (say, like, I don't know, The Lightning Thief). Some of the situations Hiccup gets himself in are truly intense. It's one of the reasons why, though I do love the films, I would love for a one-hundred-percent faithful cartoon animated series to be adapted from these books - I want to see these scenes! Watching Httyd 2 in cinema I got the feeling that the directors were trying to make Hiccup look a little more 'badass' (that awesome fire-sword though...). I'm not gonna say that book-version Hiccup is much of a badass himself (in the end he'll always be the nicey-nice guy) but because he's so unexceptional and pathetic-looking other characters get that much more shocked and afraid when he does manage to put one over on them. He doesn't always manage to keep his cool, and wins don't come easy - he panics, and gets scared, and very often has to fight for his life, but that's what makes the danger seem more real, and Hiccup more like a hero (especially considering that he's still a kid). Aside from the aforementioned sketch with the Green Death, my most favorite scene of the series, I would really love to see Hiccup looking for the witch in the dark of the tree-prison, or riding away on the back of the Windwalker with a murderous hundreds-strong dragon hoard on the chase, or scrambling up the mast of a sinking ship trying to get away from an axe-wielding madman in the midst of a storm, fully animated. Not like a regular kids' cartoon but something more along the lines of Avatar: The Last Airbender. On page a lot of these situations may sound ridiculous, but if you really allow yourself to picture it that way it's nothing short of astounding. Plus Hiccup is an expert sword-fighter in this version. **** December 2015 The final book has been released and I've read it and loved it, and a link to my review is right here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    As we all know, movies often aren't much like the books they're based on, and that's incredibly true here. Now, the setting's the same: Vikings, dragons, characters and all that. However, there are a couple of major differences, based even on what I remember from the movie I saw once about three years ago. When you think of How to Train Your Dragon, I bet your first thought is something along these lines: Certainly, I did. Awkward boy befriends adorable dragon. Cuteness abounds. Everyone learns t As we all know, movies often aren't much like the books they're based on, and that's incredibly true here. Now, the setting's the same: Vikings, dragons, characters and all that. However, there are a couple of major differences, based even on what I remember from the movie I saw once about three years ago. When you think of How to Train Your Dragon, I bet your first thought is something along these lines: Certainly, I did. Awkward boy befriends adorable dragon. Cuteness abounds. Everyone learns things. Not really how it goes down, though. The actual story is definitely tailored to a little boy audience, with gross jokes, battles and such. Also, Toothless is creepy as all get out. And green. No, seriously. Toothless is not remotely adorable. He's crude and gross, and purposely poops all over Hiccup's house. Also, he hates Hiccup for most of it, and Hiccup hates him, mostly because the Vikings actually use dragons as slaves after they DRAGONNAP them from their caves when they're babies. That's one of the tests to become a full member of the tribe. As is training the dragon to do what you say by yelling at it. Oh, AND Toothless is way smaller than in the movie. Hiccup can carry him around. If anything, Toothless reminded me of Gollum. Yeah. Basically, I kept expecting the story to end with a realization that dragons need to be treated more equally, considering that they're smart and have their own language and everything, but that didn't really happen. Like, at the end, I think they respect dragons a little more, but still plan to make the dragons do what they say. I just didn't really feel that much sympathy with the Vikings when the HUGE dragon arrives with plans to eat them, yanno? Also, just fyi, there was not a single female character in this story that I noticed. Not a one. Apparently the Vikings figured out a way to procreate with only men, or with dragons. Of course, I don't think that's true. Women are just so unimportant they're wholly unworthy of mention. Thanks, movie, for adding in a wholly not historically accurate female character who was in the same class as the boys. I mean, there are dragons, so are we really that big on historical accuracy? Much as I didn't like the story, because it's just totally not for me, there is one reason I rated this three stars and did like listening to it: WORTH IT. Oh, David Tennant. I love him as Doctor Who, of course, but now I got to hear him go full on Scottish, and I loved it. He's a delightful narrator, just as you would expect. He even did a voice that was rather reminiscent of Jeremy Irons for the giant, man-eating dragon. I just sort of tried to pay as little attention as possible to the story and to soak in the accents. I wish I could say that I liked this enough overall to want to continue with the rest of the audiobooks he narrated (which is six or seven of the series), but I don't. As much as I love David Tennant, I would have to buy each one from Audible, and that's just too much money for books I don't like. If my library had them, well, that would be another story. So, there you have it. Unless you're a huge David Tennant fan (why wouldn't you be?) or totally okay with the absence of women and treatment of the dragons, you'll probably want to skip this one. However, that's sad. Let's look at David Tennant one more time, huh?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    How do I rate this book? I rate it "Started reading it to my six year old but when he was too tired to continue I kept reading to myself and didn't put it down until I reached the last page."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hippo dari Hongkong

    review pake bahasa naga uuuuuuuuuuuuy, akkui.. kutukkaaaaa skalle bukkkuw inni. dobleh yammihi krauk-krauk hahahihi. winglesh viking kiccil kiccil, hiccup & fishleg kambrratui. snotlout & dogsbreath brengsshik hicup, tittak rammakh, tukka hiaat-hiaat, tukka keshruppan maggabuk kambrratui shanashini, guccuh. toothles naga kiccil, tattukka shi ikanbusshuk, inni yakkih, inni dobleh dobleh yakkih. tatukka kangkang bikkhin muwwal-pushing-prut. tukka gaga allas bokkong & flip-flop. hrrap tit review pake bahasa naga uuuuuuuuuuuuy, akkui.. kutukkaaaaa skalle bukkkuw inni. dobleh yammihi krauk-krauk hahahihi. winglesh viking kiccil kiccil, hiccup & fishleg kambrratui. snotlout & dogsbreath brengsshik hicup, tittak rammakh, tukka hiaat-hiaat, tukka keshruppan maggabuk kambrratui shanashini, guccuh. toothles naga kiccil, tattukka shi ikanbusshuk, inni yakkih, inni dobleh dobleh yakkih. tatukka kangkang bikkhin muwwal-pushing-prut. tukka gaga allas bokkong & flip-flop. hrrap tittaak puppa diddamdam rokkum review buat yang gak ngerti bahasa naga buku pertama dari petualangan seorang anak ceking bernama hiccup; putra seorang stoick agung, kepala suku viking hooligan berbulu. diawali dengan sebuah inisiasi, anak-anak kaum barbar viking ini harus melewati ujian agar diterima sebagai bagian dari suku hooligan berbulu. ujian pertama yang dipimpin gober the belch adalah anak2 ini wajib masuk ke gua naga dan menangkap seekor anak naga untuk dipelihara. semua anak (kecuali fishlegs) meledek hiccup yang hanya berhasil menangkap naga kebun biasa yang amat sangat kecil! naga ini gak cuman kecil tapi kelakuannya bener menyebalkan dan nyusahin aja. tak hanya itu, naga sotoy ini gak punya gigi! sehingga dinamai toothless. hiccup dan fishleg selalu jadi bulan-bulanan snotlout sepupunya dan temennya sesama preman cilik viking si dogsbreath. keadaan jadi kacow ketika si jail toothles memancing perkelahian yang menyebabkan para naga2 peliharaan anak2 ini seperti fireworm, seaslug, killer, brightclaw, alligatiger saling berkelahi sehingga anak2 ini harus dihukum. tetapi keadaan jadi genting karena ditemukannya dua ekor naga raksasa segede gaban dari jenis lautus gigantismus maksimus. ada adegan yang bikin gw guling2 yaitu ketika gober dan 400 orang viking dengan sotoynya berusaha mengusir naga2 raksasa tsb (gagal total tentu saja) dan pada akhirnya anak2 ini bersatu untuk "mengadu domba" kedua naga raksasa tersebut dengan "rencana busuk yang cerdas." hahahaha. berhasilkah rencana busuk yang cerdas" mereka? baca aja deh. oiya, ilustrasi dibuku ini juga bikin hahahihi. denger2 sih dreamworks lagi menggarap proyek animasi buat buku ini, dah kelar blom ya? musti nonton nih filmnya. bottom line, this book cracked me up! and I hope the movie too udhah ah, mo byur byur dimukmuk, glek glek shi byur byur kutatukka gaga dim prutprut, tittak bolle bolle! kutukka presshiprut-wek-wek, muah muah yakkih aiyaiiiiih laggiihhh erie pakar bahasa naga (bukan cacing)

  6. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    I wanted to read this book because I HAD A DRAGON SHAPED HOLE IN MY READING LIFE. Come on! Who hasn't heard of the movie?!! And there's a book? I would be a negligant bookworm if I ignored it. Just so you know: it's nothing like the movie. Except some of the names are the same. Nope, in the book Hiccup and the boys of his village must capture a dragon and train it in order to be initiated as warriors. Hiccup captures a very tiny insignificant looking dragon who has no teeth so he calls it Toothl I wanted to read this book because I HAD A DRAGON SHAPED HOLE IN MY READING LIFE. Come on! Who hasn't heard of the movie?!! And there's a book? I would be a negligant bookworm if I ignored it. Just so you know: it's nothing like the movie. Except some of the names are the same. Nope, in the book Hiccup and the boys of his village must capture a dragon and train it in order to be initiated as warriors. Hiccup captures a very tiny insignificant looking dragon who has no teeth so he calls it Toothless. (TOOTHLESS.) Toothless is cantankerous and coldhearted and utterly rude and Hiccup can't train him. To be honest, I love the movie most. But the book is fantastic! I can totally see readers 8+ enjoying the draongish adventures. There's snot jokes and everyone's names are ridiculous and Hiccup is just a little self-deprecating. I ADORED the illustrations! There were scratchy sketches on most pages and I just have to say it made the book. I loved the book on training dragons too, with it's helpful instructions which are, in entirety: yell at it. So useful. I did feel a little too old for it.... Which isn't usually the case for me and MG books, but for this one? I read very very fast and I enjoyed myself entirely, but I couldn't help wishing I'd had it to read when I was 10. STILL. The dragon shaped hole in my life is appeased and I'm glad Toothless was still awesome if not big and black. (There was no dragon riding.) And I did love Hiccup and how he looked out for Fishlegs even though it cost him (and he really did it without thinking). Like most MG books, it addresses bullying. It smacks bullies in the nose. Literally sometimes. Toothless was, entirely, toothless. Just so you know. But he nearly got his named changed to Toothful. I wonder if that will happen later.. An entirely cute and worthwhile read! TOOTHLESS AND HICCUP WERE ADORABLE.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaina

    Edit: 2nd reading *** The book is good, but the audio book just opened the characters up for me. It made the book more dynamic and the characters seem more fun. I was more enthusiastic this time. I will be seeking out more books read by Tennant, whom seems to come up with an endless amount of voices and energy to back them. ************ I now have the audio book to go with this one. So far I’m thinking this will change my rating. It adds a lot to it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    [First read: 3rd June, 2011. Three stars. Second read: 8th April, 2017. One star.] Apparently I read this in 2011 and gave it three stars. I do remember that I had read it, but had no recollection of it at all. Six years is a long time... I will first of all say disregard the film altogether with this book. It is nothing like it, they may as well have just paid Cowell for the title and character names, which they seemingly did. However, the film did not hinder my enjoyment-or lack thereof-of thi [First read: 3rd June, 2011. Three stars. Second read: 8th April, 2017. One star.] Apparently I read this in 2011 and gave it three stars. I do remember that I had read it, but had no recollection of it at all. Six years is a long time... I will first of all say disregard the film altogether with this book. It is nothing like it, they may as well have just paid Cowell for the title and character names, which they seemingly did. However, the film did not hinder my enjoyment-or lack thereof-of this book as I consider them to be two completely different mediums that there's no comparison between words and pictures. How to Train Your Dragon follows Hiccup Horrendous the Third, heir to the leadership of an island of 'orrible Vikings and his venture in to becoming a proper Viking, by getting a dragon pet and rescuing his fellow inhabitants of the isle of Berk from a very large dragon indeed. I'm glad Cressida had the decency to note at the beginning of the book that this has no relation to real-life history because it really doesn't. It was a little difficult to assimilate this at first, as every little thing we think we know about Vikings but is wrong is right here in this book. Horns on helmets and that kind of thing. I think a young child would find the disgusting bits disgusting and the funny bits funny and, whilst I'm well aware I am not the intended market, I don't think it's the snappiest thing ever written. It features nothing particularly astounding or even mediocre, it just flows along in it's own little world. Which is fine, maybe, for kids. Kids who don't really read that much and probably liked the film. For me, and probably for kids who do actually like reading and have already devoured half the kid's section of the local library, I'd say it was probably not something they should be tackling. I don't recall any of the things I enjoyed on my first read-through all those years ago, so can't even think of any positives. It is fun and I suppose it is lovely to have a protagonist and hero who is a bit "nerdy" and "normal" and who stands up to bullies as much as he can, but there's a distinctive propulsion of fate to help him along which never exists in the real world.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    The Good: Such a fun children's book. Great setting, great ideas about dragons, and it's often funny and quite rugged. The Bad: Your kids might hate how different it is to the animated movies. Plus it is a children's book, so adults aren't likely to find it very deep. 'Friends' character the protagonist is most like: Just like Ross, Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III is a smart but reluctant protagonist, and his pet uses him without pity.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lexie

    BEHOLD MY FIENDISH YELL OF APPROVAL™!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristijan

    "How to train your dragon" je jedna sasvim OK knjižica koja će na momente nasmejati svoje čitaoce. Verovatno sam prestar za nju i verovatno je animirana verzija ostavila na mene mnogo veći utisak, tako da ne mogu da dam više od tri zvezdice.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    At the moment, I'm reading an intense historical fiction novel set in Italy during WWII. After awhile I need a break from such a serious subject. I came across this lovely audiobook narrated by David Tennant, and knew that was just the thing I needed to listen to! I'm glad I did! Before now, I had only seen the animated movie of this story. I had never read the book. I love the movie.....but the book is so much better! Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III is the son of a chief. While that's pretty cool At the moment, I'm reading an intense historical fiction novel set in Italy during WWII. After awhile I need a break from such a serious subject. I came across this lovely audiobook narrated by David Tennant, and knew that was just the thing I needed to listen to! I'm glad I did! Before now, I had only seen the animated movie of this story. I had never read the book. I love the movie.....but the book is so much better! Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III is the son of a chief. While that's pretty cool in itself, he still has to prove that he can catch and train his own dragon to become a real member of the Hairy Hooligans Tribe. He's a bit worried about it. The other boys have given him some great nicknames like "Useless''....so anyone can understand why he is a bit afraid of failing and being exiled. He and all the other Boys go on their adventure to capture their dragons.....and he does manage to get one. But, it's the smallest dragon anyone has ever seen.....and it won't listen to him. Somehow he has to train Toothless before the ceremony.....will he manage? OMG! This story is soooooo cute! And, listening to David Tennant do all the voices is such a hoot!! This unabridged audiobook version is just a bit over 3.5 hours long. David Tennant reads at a nice even speed, and acts out the action very well. I have hearing loss, but I was easily able to hear and understand everything. I had a great time listening and rooting for Hiccup & Toothless! :) There were some scenes that actually had me laughing out loud. :) Great book! I'm going to rewatch the movie now......both are very enjoyable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristie

    Listened to the audiobook with my grandson. I thought it was really cute and he enjoyed it. It was a great opportunity to explain how movies can be very different from the books.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    David Tennant reads the audiobook. Need I say more?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    My, my. I knew the movie and LOVED it for Toothless and his cat-like quirky appearance as well as all the great prejudices and jokes. By coincidence I then discovered the audiobook was read by none other than "Ten" aka David Tennant and HAD to try listening to it. "Try" because I usually fall asleep. ;p I fell asleep here too (last night) so I had to backtrack and find the spot where I had stopped actively listening ... this, amongst other things, is why I don't like audiobooks too much. The story My, my. I knew the movie and LOVED it for Toothless and his cat-like quirky appearance as well as all the great prejudices and jokes. By coincidence I then discovered the audiobook was read by none other than "Ten" aka David Tennant and HAD to try listening to it. "Try" because I usually fall asleep. ;p I fell asleep here too (last night) so I had to backtrack and find the spot where I had stopped actively listening ... this, amongst other things, is why I don't like audiobooks too much. The story is that of a Viking boy named Hiccup and how he became master of a dragon named Toothless. The story is VERY funny and David Tennant is a master at making different sounds and voices and breathing life into this audiobook. He made the story being even more hilarious. I might even go so far as to say that he did a better job than Stephen Fry with the Harry Potter books! But maybe it was just his Scottish accent and they are both equally brilliant. Anyway, he's done such a great job that I will listen to the 2nd book soon (no matter how many times I have to backtrack). Now I know there are a lot here who, like me, know the movie but not the book. To all of you I can say that the story is almost completely different. Toothless is an entirely different breed of dragon, which makes him being Hiccup's dragon so funny. The way the Vikings of Berk live with dragons is completely different to the first movie as well which results in a completely different adventure. Much like with Neil Gaiman's Stardust, I have to say that both, book and movie, are very good BUT *drumroll* the movie is slightly better. I don't know exactly what it is, maybe that the movie had an important message (that thing about (view spoiler)[first Toothless and then also Hiccup being disabled in a world where their physical appearance, at least Hiccup's, was already considered "weak" and "disadvantageous" (hide spoiler)] ), but there is a certain charm to the movie that the book lacked - despite David Tennant (which is also why I deducted one star). Other than that I'd like to point out how old these books are! Cressida Cowell published this first book back in 1988 - a time, I believe, when dragons were not all that popular (especially not compared to nowadays). The humour as well as how the story is constructed, the names, the worldbuilding ... it seems as if the story had been written only a couple of years ago and I'm sure they were pretty unique in the 80s ... innovative and fantastic!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Banks

    Read this one with my sons - the eldest loved it (and immediately went to find the second in the series at the local library). The humour in this book is outstanding, love the creation of the world of Berk, and the way the author brings to life this hostile, alarming terrain. The characters are hilarious, their names alone had my boys laughing - and the illustrations perfectly complement the plot. Definitely a great read for kids aged from 7 upwards.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nusrat Mahmood

    মুভিটা বেশি ভাল। এটাও সুনদর কিনতু সিনেমার কাহিনী বেশি ভাল লেগেছে। সেখানে ডরাগনরা কথা বলতে পারেনা, বইয়ের টুথলেসের এত টযানটরাম! বাবারে বাবা! মাঝখানে মনে হচছিল, ভিকষা চাইনা, কুততা সামলা! দরকার নাই আমার ডরাগনের! কিনতু ছোটদের জনয দারুণ একটা বই নিঃসনদেহে। মূল বইয়ে সমভবত ছবি আছে, আমি ইপাব পড়েছি- সেটায় ছিল না। এই কষট কই রাখি! মুভিটা বেশি ভাল। এটাও সুন্দর কিন্তু সিনেমার কাহিনী বেশি ভাল লেগেছে। সেখানে ড্রাগনরা কথা বলতে পারেনা, বইয়ের টুথলেসের এত ট্যান্ট্রাম! বাবারে বাবা! মাঝখানে মনে হচ্ছিল, ভিক্ষা চাইনা, কুত্তা সামলা! দরকার নাই আমার ড্রাগনের! কিন্তু ছোটদের জন্য দারুণ একটা বই নিঃসন্দেহে। মূল বইয়ে সম্ভবত ছবি আছে, আমি ইপাব পড়েছি- সেটায় ছিল না। এই কষ্ট কই রাখি!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melania 🍒

    3,3/5 Very funny and cute 😌 A delight

  19. 4 out of 5

    Totoro

    cuuuuuuuute ^ ^ well, it was a cute and refreshing book after all, i wasn't quite sure it would be suitable for my age, but it went right through my heart.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This is a kids series and it's the story of Hiccup and his dragon Toothless. I'm a keen dragon-fan, and I particularly like the charm of this series for the relationship the Vikings have with their Dragon counter-parts. In this story (the first) we follow Hiccup and his other friends as they have to first find their Dragons and then train them... I actually audio-booked this and I would thoroughly recommend the audio-book as a great way to read this (although I've also read some of these books al This is a kids series and it's the story of Hiccup and his dragon Toothless. I'm a keen dragon-fan, and I particularly like the charm of this series for the relationship the Vikings have with their Dragon counter-parts. In this story (the first) we follow Hiccup and his other friends as they have to first find their Dragons and then train them... I actually audio-booked this and I would thoroughly recommend the audio-book as a great way to read this (although I've also read some of these books aloud with my younger brother). It's narrated by David Tennant and he does an excellent job of bringing the world and characters to life. Not only that, but you also get sound effects and also some fun musical interludes to set the tone. Perfect for kids but still lots of fun for all I really enjoyed it. I will say that Toothless is my favourite character because of his snark and sass, but he's how a Dragon should be and I like the pairing. Solid 3*s overall :D

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karis

    *3.75 Stars* Being the bookworm that I am, ever since first watching the How to Train Your Dragon movies and seeing the “inspired by the How to Train Your Dragon book series by Cressida Cowell,” flit across the screen, I’ve wanted to see for myself what the books really are like and how they compare to the movies and following shows that I’ve since watched. My eleven-year-old brother and I are the real HTTYD fans in the house, and together we read the first book, me reading over his shoulder, im *3.75 Stars* Being the bookworm that I am, ever since first watching the How to Train Your Dragon movies and seeing the “inspired by the How to Train Your Dragon book series by Cressida Cowell,” flit across the screen, I’ve wanted to see for myself what the books really are like and how they compare to the movies and following shows that I’ve since watched. My eleven-year-old brother and I are the real HTTYD fans in the house, and together we read the first book, me reading over his shoulder, impatiently waiting for him to finish and turn the page. :P The book has a much different premise than the movies, as dragon training is the norm. The dragons are smaller, not nearly as loyal, tending to just look out for themselves; as well, the cast of characters is a little off, and the plot is written with not nearly as serious a tone. But I have a feeling that this book could have been a favorite of mine when I was younger, and had I read it then, I’m sure my stories and adventures as a young child would have been filled with raids into dragon’s lairs, terrifying battle-masters, and days spent in “Viking training” with my younger sister aka comrade in arms. I believe that that was the real intention of the author with her books—to spark kids’ imagination and open up a world of adventure to them. Hiccup is still much the same (although after seeing him in the Race to the Edge seasons it was hard going back to when he was a kid). But there was dozen of lines that had me grinning because they were SO him. Same with Snotlout. ;) I’ve heard that the books get more intense throughout the series, and I am eager to see the character building develop. I enjoyed seeing the similarities between the movie and book of how Hiccup wins the respect of, at least most of, the other trainees for his brains and skills with dragons when the island is faced with the threat of the Green and Purple Deaths, giant sea dragons. And how it’s Thuggory, the other chief’s son that supports him; that scene when he stands up against Snotlout for Hiccup has to be one of my top three favorite scenes from the book. (I never cared much for Astrid’s role that way in the first movie and was glad for her absence in the book. *worries that I opened a whole can of worms with that statement*) Toothless is startlingly different than his movie counterpart, but I actually grew to love the little stinker by the end of the book. Too cute, but in a different way than the Nightfury Toothless of the movies is. Overall, I enjoyed the book, my lower rating only being a result of reading it past the right age for them. Since we both read it together, I thought I’d ask my little brother his thoughts. This is what he said: “It’s similar to the first movie but with a different twist and a sometimes unexpected plot. I liked it because it is easy for me as a kid to relate to Hiccup and the being taunted at by older kids. The characters are lovable, and the little dragons such stinkers. I could see how the movie Hiccup came out of his book counterpart. Although, this is definitely the good old Hiccup from Movie #1, not the second movie or Netflix shows. I like that they cartooned it. I mean, come on, the story’s MEANT for kids, (although that shouldn’t stop older fans from loving and enjoying either the books or movies). My favorite scenes were at the end with Toothless and with Stoic’s letter to Professor Yobbish. So, my review *****—five stars.” Also, perhaps this is just my coming from an older perspective, but is anyone else a little saddened and concerned by how many middle-grade books portray parents and those in authority in general as dumb, and/or have the kids being disrespectful—and it being funny? That has always been my concern and something I noticed and tried to point out and correct to my younger brother as we were reading together.

  22. 5 out of 5

    milou ✲

    I should've gotten around to reading this book much sooner because I've been such a devoted fan of this franchise ever since the first movie got released and I had this book on my tbr for many years up until now. I suggest that you forget entirely about the movies because these books aren't anything like them. They hardly have the same characters in them and only a few of them I recognized actually. Still the main character that we all know is Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III and he is much younger I should've gotten around to reading this book much sooner because I've been such a devoted fan of this franchise ever since the first movie got released and I had this book on my tbr for many years up until now. I suggest that you forget entirely about the movies because these books aren't anything like them. They hardly have the same characters in them and only a few of them I recognized actually. Still the main character that we all know is Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III and he is much younger here than you expect him to be. In the movie the vikings went out to hunt down the dragons, but here they actually try to tame their dragons which is unique. Of course Hiccup's path crosses with that of the dragon Toothless who you don't even recognize. He is so freaking small and a different color and most importantly he can talk, but only to Hiccup since he speaks Dragonese. LOOK AT HOW TINY HE IS Sure this book is written for a younger audience, but they are also very enjoyable for people of an older age who like dragons. I found this twist in the story that I knew so refreshing and I'm eager to delve into the rest of the series to find out what else Cressida Cowell has in store. What was basically the best experience about listening to the audiobook of this is Mr. David Tennant. I've been admiring this man for all these wonderful roles that he has played, especially that of Alec Hardy in Broadchurch am I right? Anyway it was an absolute delight to listen to him making dragon noises and yelling with that Scottish accent of his. - #1 How To Train Your Dragon ★★★★ - #2 How to Be a Pirate ★★★★

  23. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    Full (mini) review now posted! I’ve loved the movie inspired by this book for years. Longer, in fact, than I knew that the book even existed. However, I had heard that the book was far different than the movie. So when I saw the audiobook was narrated by David Tennant, my favorite Doctor from Doctor Who and the fabulous new voice of Scrooge McDuck, I took the plunge. This was a fun story, made even more entertaining through the incredibly Scottish narration of Tennant. I love the idea of Viking vi Full (mini) review now posted! I’ve loved the movie inspired by this book for years. Longer, in fact, than I knew that the book even existed. However, I had heard that the book was far different than the movie. So when I saw the audiobook was narrated by David Tennant, my favorite Doctor from Doctor Who and the fabulous new voice of Scrooge McDuck, I took the plunge. This was a fun story, made even more entertaining through the incredibly Scottish narration of Tennant. I love the idea of Viking villages using dragons the size of dogs to fish for them. It’s a cute concept. As is the idea of boys having to train their own dragons, and having very little guidance to help them do so. I enjoyed Hiccup as a protagonist just as much in the book as I did in the movie. However, I did not enjoy Toothless as much, unfortunately. While he was funny, and I liked the addition of dragon dialogue, he wasn’t nearly as epic as his silver-screen counterpart. Cressida Cowell’s little novel was funny and entertaining and even sweet at times. I can see where this would be a wonderful book to read to kids before bed, or to listen to as a family on a road trip. I highly suggest the audiobook, as David Tennant is an absolutely fabulous narrator. And once you read it with your kids, definitely watch the movie, as I still consider it just a bit superior.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dulce Espinosa

    5 estrellas porque la narración (?)de David Tennant es increíbleeeee! No había disfrutado tanto un audiolibro, es gracioso y le da vida a los personajes! :') David Tennant is the best narrator ever!!!!!!!!!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Posle para depresivnih i teskih romana pravo zadovoljstvo je procitati nesto "lako" i nevino:) Knjiga ka knjiga nije losa i kada se uzme da je za mladje narastaje sasvim dovoljno je kvalitetna ali nista posebno ne iskace. Prica je interesantna, likovi su dosta jednostavni a i zmajevi su fino opisani... par njih iz ctave gomile. Iskreno receno ovo je jedan od redjih slucajeva di je film, ai sama serija, dosta bolja od knjige na koju se bazira. Slobodno procitajte ako ste voleli film ali ne ocekujte Posle para depresivnih i teskih romana pravo zadovoljstvo je procitati nesto "lako" i nevino:) Knjiga ka knjiga nije losa i kada se uzme da je za mladje narastaje sasvim dovoljno je kvalitetna ali nista posebno ne iskace. Prica je interesantna, likovi su dosta jednostavni a i zmajevi su fino opisani... par njih iz ctave gomile. Iskreno receno ovo je jedan od redjih slucajeva di je film, ai sama serija, dosta bolja od knjige na koju se bazira. Slobodno procitajte ako ste voleli film ali ne ocekujte istu magiju.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicki Chapelway

    Normally the books are much better than the movies. That was not the case with this book. The movie is waaay better and after watching it, this book was a bit of a disappointment.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

    Like many people, I got around to reading this after seeing (and becoming smitten/obsessed with) the Dreamworks movie version. Movie Toothless, and to some extent Hiccup, holds a place in my heart forever. I'm already planning to buy the DVD the day it's released. Naturally, I'm not inclined to adopt the book as devotedly as those who read it before seeing the movie and scorn the film as the scourge of the earth. I find that whenever I watch a movie before reading a book- like, say, Stardust- I e Like many people, I got around to reading this after seeing (and becoming smitten/obsessed with) the Dreamworks movie version. Movie Toothless, and to some extent Hiccup, holds a place in my heart forever. I'm already planning to buy the DVD the day it's released. Naturally, I'm not inclined to adopt the book as devotedly as those who read it before seeing the movie and scorn the film as the scourge of the earth. I find that whenever I watch a movie before reading a book- like, say, Stardust- I enjoy them both equally. (Exception: Carl Sagan's Contact, while a brilliant movie, is a much better book.) I will nitpick and rant endlessly about the distortion of books I read before seeing the movie, but the other way around lets me appreciate the two as they are. Yes, this is more than a little bit hypocritical. Anyhow, my point is this: This is a good children's book. I would have quite liked it if I'd read it when I fit into its target age group. I quite like it now, in fact. I do think the movie offers rather a more complex plotline and more intricate characters, but that's to be expected; it's a lot easier to slide hints of depth into an animated film than a kid's book. Strangely, I felt after reading it that this book could have been set a good time following the movie- at the point where time and some societal upheavals have distorted the human-dragon cooperation into near slavery. If I were inclined towards fanfic, I might explore that idea some more; as is, I just offer it as a compromise for those unable to reconcile one version whith another.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abigail McKenna

    There were dragons when I was a boy. Okay, this is going up another star just for the audiobook. It was fabulous. David Tennant was perfect. Series playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/mylittl... I love Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III with all of my heart, okay? He's just such a good, pure bean and I want to adopt him. But he actually has a better relationship with his dad than I remembered? Like, obviously, there's the whole exile thing, but Stoick regrets it immediately, and he actually real There were dragons when I was a boy. Okay, this is going up another star just for the audiobook. It was fabulous. David Tennant was perfect. Series playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/mylittl... I love Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III with all of my heart, okay? He's just such a good, pure bean and I want to adopt him. But he actually has a better relationship with his dad than I remembered? Like, obviously, there's the whole exile thing, but Stoick regrets it immediately, and he actually really cares for Hiccup and you can tell right off the bat. I'm just really emotional over their relationship okay. I adored being able to revisit where these characters started, now knowing where they end up. It was really fun. I can't wait to continue on. 3 stars from my first time reading it, 4 stars for the audiobook.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This was a cute little children's book. But, reader beware, it was nothing like the movie. Hiccup, his dad and Toothless, were all very different in this book. However, it was still a fun little story in its own right. Because the plot was different, it was all new to me. I knew it would end with a big red bow because it is a children's book, but I had no idea how the characters were going to get there. So 4 stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I had no idea that the book "How to Train Your Dragon" had come before the movie; after seeing the movie I heard about the book but I just assumed for some strange reason (Without checking into it, I know shame on me) that it had been written after the movie. Not that that has anything to do with anything but I just thought I'd throw it out there. So yeah, the book was written first, and it was awesome! Often times I find that children's books are just as good if not better than a lot of the popu I had no idea that the book "How to Train Your Dragon" had come before the movie; after seeing the movie I heard about the book but I just assumed for some strange reason (Without checking into it, I know shame on me) that it had been written after the movie. Not that that has anything to do with anything but I just thought I'd throw it out there. So yeah, the book was written first, and it was awesome! Often times I find that children's books are just as good if not better than a lot of the popular 'young adult' books out there and in the case of 'How to Train Your Dragon' it was a ton better than many of the young adult books I've read lately. Funny, fast paced, and descriptive 'How to Train your Dragon' is a must read for people of every age and hey, it's actually better than the movie! If that's possible:)

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