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Introducing Feminism PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Introducing Feminism
Author: Susan Alice Watkins
Publisher: Published August 13th 1997 by Icon Books (first published March 16th 1990)
ISBN: 9781840460582
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

265995.Introducing_Feminism.pdf

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Cuts through the myths surrounding the subject and provides an incisive account of the women's movement from its surprisingly recent birth in the French Revolution to the worldwide explosion of women's liberation in the 1970s and the conservative backlash of the Reagan and Thatcher years of the 1980s.

30 review for Introducing Feminism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Oraby

    شكرًا للصديقة آية للترشيح

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hadeel S. Rasheed

    مشكلة هذه السلسلة هي الترجمة و بعثرة المعلومات من قبل المؤلفين.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gözen Durmus

    Feminizmi başından sonuna kadar harika bir dille anlatıyorlar. Karikatürlerle, ironilerle harikalar yaratıyor. O kadar iyi o kadar keyifli bir kitaptı ki, hayatımda okuduğum en iyi kitaplardan biridir diyebilirim.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shooq

    هذه السلسة ممتعة أكثر من أنها تقدم رصد أو تحليل ، بعثرة االمعلومات وانعدام تسلسل الأحداث كان مرهق خاصة إني أفضل دائما الأسلوب الأكاديمي ، قد تكون خيار جيد لنوع محدد من القرّاء ولكنها ليست مدخل جيد للجميع . وكتاب ميّة الرحبي النسوية مفاهيم وقضايا ممتاز جدا كمدخل مرتب ومبسط ..

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tristan MacAvery

    First released in 1992, this book could use a bit of updating. I will not make the idiotic claim that "things are so much better now," but some few rays of light have penetrated this dismal darkness. To borrow from those fighting against racism, "The struggle continues." This book is still extremely valuable as (as the title tells us) an introduction to the concept -- an astonishing concept, to some males -- the women are people, and that the ridiculous ways by which men have tried to subjugate t First released in 1992, this book could use a bit of updating. I will not make the idiotic claim that "things are so much better now," but some few rays of light have penetrated this dismal darkness. To borrow from those fighting against racism, "The struggle continues." This book is still extremely valuable as (as the title tells us) an introduction to the concept -- an astonishing concept, to some males -- the women are people, and that the ridiculous ways by which men have tried to subjugate them continue today. Guys, read this book before you say that "women have come a long way..." (which they have) "...and it's not a problem anymore." (wrong answer!) Is it a "spoiler" for me to tell you that, by the end of the book, you'll realize that there's still a helluva lot of work to do? I'm male, and therefore genuinely ignorant of what women must go through. I do my best to educate myself, yet I am still not able truly to understand the astonishing way in which women are treated. In my ignorance, I make ham-fisted attempts to behave positively and, on occasion, unintentionally offend. I'll keep trying. I'd like to think we all will. I'll say this one thing, hoping that the right point is made: I will consider my male self "equal" to a woman when I can be forced to keep an unwanted parasite inside my body, suffering from hormonal extremes and debilitating physical issues, until finally going through hours of agony trying to pass a bowling ball through some orifice, then be told that I was a slut for not being married, that I'm to be blamed for being unable to afford childcare when I'm forced to work, to be condemned as a bad parent because I can get no healthcare for myself or my child, when male doctors tell me that "it's not that bad, you're just making excuses for being a weak female," and yet through all that successfully manage to raise an intelligent, caring, socially aware child ... who has a great chance of being shot to death at his school, or denied decent schools because our government wants stupid people that they can control, or worse yet, that *she* can't get into a good school because her trashy mom could only have raised her to be a slut just like her... Woman, You bring forth the Goddess from which all Gods are born. We should remember, fellow males, that biologically speaking, a male is just a means by which females can create more females. When they can do that without us, we truly are doomed... and from the way we've been acting, it would probably be a damned good thing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ape

    Well, it did what it said on the tin, and introduced feminism. So things were missed out, nothing was explored in detail (which was frustrating at times for me when something got interesting) but for an overview book you can't ask for a lot more. Although I was surprised by some of the things that were missed out. They mentioned the Pankhursts, but didn't mention the horse incident! Marie Stopes doesn't get a mention at all. It was published in 1994 but some of it felt properly out of date. Ok, 1 Well, it did what it said on the tin, and introduced feminism. So things were missed out, nothing was explored in detail (which was frustrating at times for me when something got interesting) but for an overview book you can't ask for a lot more. Although I was surprised by some of the things that were missed out. They mentioned the Pankhursts, but didn't mention the horse incident! Marie Stopes doesn't get a mention at all. It was published in 1994 but some of it felt properly out of date. Ok, 1994 is almost 20 years ago (ek!) but there are moments in this book when it feels like we're still very much stuck in the seventies. And also moments when it felt as though they were teetering on the edge about to go into extremism, man-hating for the sake of it etc... I liked the kind of magazine, funky style of representing chunks of history, thoughts and ideas. It made it entertaining to read and accessible.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Good basic introduction to feminism. Tries to cover everything but of course that means that it only gives very brief details, however this makes it a good starting point from which to research further information about the bits that really interest you. The book only goes up to 1990 so not the best book for people interested in more recent feminist theory or achievements.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Made me aware of some important women I'd previously never heard of, and gave enough information about what they accomplished. Overall I found it a little simplistic and light. Would have liked more hard facts. Felt very dated at times and ran a bit close to preachy propaganda. Some really outlandish turns of phrase that jarred. Would have liked more detail.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Sark

    Underground Railroad p.30 – Other black women risked their lives on the “Underground Railroad,” an undercover escape route to the North from the Southern slave states. Harriet Tubman (1823-1913) was a slave born in Maryland. She was a tough, adventurous little girl. Harriet ran away with her brothers when she was 25. Harriet became one of the most famous “conductors” on the Railroad. Bringing over 300 slaves to freedom through unimaginable risks. Most of the runaways were young men, but Harriet b Underground Railroad p.30 – Other black women risked their lives on the “Underground Railroad,” an undercover escape route to the North from the Southern slave states. Harriet Tubman (1823-1913) was a slave born in Maryland. She was a tough, adventurous little girl. Harriet ran away with her brothers when she was 25. Harriet became one of the most famous “conductors” on the Railroad. Bringing over 300 slaves to freedom through unimaginable risks. Most of the runaways were young men, but Harriet brought out women with babies and little children too. Historical Materialism and the Women’s Cause p.82 – Since Wollstonecraft’s time feminists had believed that the subordinate position of women was neither “natural” nor inevitable, but socially created. But they had no evidence to argue against the dominant religious view that God had created women as “secondary and inferior” creatures of out of Adam’s rib. By the 1880s, Darwin’s theory of biological evolution and the discoveries made by the new science of anthropology could be combined for the first time to explain how women became subordinate to men. Friedrich Engels (1820-95), revolutionary socialist, writer and activist, was a staunch supporter of women’s rights and suffrage. p.83 – Engels’ book The Origins of the Family, Private Property and the State (1884) used ethnographic and historical evidence to show that women’s social position had not always been inferior. Engels drew on evidence from early Celtic, Germanic and Iroquois tribal households. “In the old, communistic household, which embraced numerous couples and their children, the administration of the household was just as much a public, socially necessary industry as the procurement of food. With the development of the modern individual family, the administration of the household lost its public character. It became a private service and the wife became the first domestic servant, pushed out of participation in social production.” Feminism and German Social Democracy p.86 – Engels’ ideas were immediately adopted by the German Social Democratic Party, an influential Socialist party that arose in the late 19th century Germany. Clara Zetkin (1857-1933) was a leader of the SPD women’s movement. Clara attended the women’s teacher training college in Leipzig, a city packed with emigres from Tsarist Russia in the 1870s. She fell in love with a Russian revolutionary, Ossip Zetkin, and joined the SPD. Women were banned from attending political meetings in Imperial Germany – their presence was often used by the police to close meetings down. The SPD was outlawed and working underground in the 1880s. p.87 – Ossip was deported from Germany with the clampdown of the 1880s. The couple lived in Paris till Ossip’s death in 1889. Widowed at 32, with two young sons to support, Clara became one of the chief organizers of the SPD’s women’s movement on her return to Germany after the anti-socialist laws were lifted in 1890. “We don’t only want women’s suffrage and equal access to work, but full co-education to bridge the artificial divide between the sexes.” Other SPD feminists such as Lily Brown (1865-1916) went further. “We need household cooperatives where women, men and children can live communally and share all work and childcare. Since the women’s movement has loosened our tongues, we see that the sexual drive is just as strong in women as in men! The form love takes should correspond to the needs of the individuals – and that includes rights of contraception and abortion!” Lily was a rebel born in an old aristocratic Prussian landowning family. She broke free, joined the SPD and wrote for its women’s magazine, Equality. In Russia p.88 – Meanwhile, the Russian revolution had occurred and a workers’ state had been created for the first time – but in the worst possible conditions, at the end of World War One, in a devastated and backward country threatened by famine and civil war. At a time like this, Lenin asked Clara Zetkin in 1920, “Why are SPD women devoting so much time to discussions about sex? Surely there are more important questions for socialist women to discuss than the marriage forms of the Maori or the theories of Sigmund Freud?” Zetkin replied: “Sex and marriage in this rotten society involve real conflict, real suffering for women of all ranks and social classes.” p.89 – Alexandra Kollontai was born into a landowning Finno-Russian family. Beautiful, fiery, and independent, she married young – against her family’s wishes – to a cousin, Vladimir Kollontai. The turning point in Alexandra’s life came in 1896, when she accompanied Vladimir, a factory inspector, on one of his visits. Vladimir was complacent but Alexandra was outraged and soon joined a Marxist group in support of the 1896 St. Petersburg textile workers’ strike. Vladimir tried to prevent her. Alexandra was bitterly torn, but in the end decided to leave him, and temporarily her son. p.90 – Alexandra’s activities in a socialist women’s group drew the attention of the Tsarist police and she had to flee Russia. Exiled in Europe and the USA, she fought passionately against the advent of the First World War. In 1914 she joined Lenin’s Bolshevik Party, the War’s strongest opponents. With the February Revolution of 1917, she returned to Russia. Seven months later after the victory of the Bolshevik’s October Revolution, Lenin brought her into his government as Commissar for Social Welfare. p.91 – Alexandra worked with other leading Bolshevik women, Inessa Armand, Nadejda Krupskaia, Ludmilla Stael, Zinaida Lilina, to implement a socialist program for women, despite the crisis of famine and civil war: • Female suffrage • Legal equality • Free divorce • Free abortion • 2 months paid maternity leave • Clinics, nurseries and maternity homes • Housing communes • Workplace and community crèches • Paid “nursing breaks” at work for mothers • Wife beating made illegal for the first time • Education and propaganda campaigns against the veiling and seclusion of women in the Muslim regions of the Soviet Union p.92 – “In practice we lag behind our intentions. In our attempt to construct new forms of life and living, to emancipate the laboring woman from family obligations, we are constantly running up against the same obstacles: Russia’s poverty and the devastation of the economy.” (Alexandra Kollontai) Alexandra brought women’s struggles for freedom – sexual and emotional as well as economic – to the very heart of the socialist revolution. She turned to fiction to explore the experiences of the “new woman” grappling with the conflicting demands of work and love, suffering passion and independence. p.99 – In the U.S. the protest movement and the fight for women’s rights once more grew out of the struggles of Afro-Americans – as it had in the 19th century. The Black Civil Rights movement began in 1955 when one brave women, Rosa Parks, sat down in a “whites only” bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama. Her protest spread into a social uprising against the white power structures. Black and white women were drawn into the fight for desegregation and voter registration. They faced armed white lynch mobs, led by sheriffs and police. Three Man Tendencies in the Women’s Movement 1970-79 p.120-21 – The women’s movement swiftly grew into a major political force, spreading across Europe and North America. Different tendencies developed within the movement as it grew – radical feminists, social feminists and liberal or “equal opportunity” feminists. Radical feminists – We radical feminists see the problem as patriarchy – a whole system of male power over women. Male rulers, male military, industrial, political, religious establishments, male trade unions and the male-dominated left are all a part of the patriarchy, reinforcing and reinforced by, the power of individual men over women and children within their families. Stressed women only campaigns and demonstrations, building a women’s space and women’s culture. They concentrated on the sharp end of male/female relations – campaigning especially against men’s violence against women, rape and pornography. Socialist feminists – How can you say that Mrs. Henry Ford IV is really in the same class as a Guatemalan peasant woman? We socialist feminists see the problem as a combination of male domination and class exploitation – our fight is against both! Real liberation is impossible as long as power and wealth in the world is monopolized by a tiny minority, and economic and social life is ruled by their lust for profits. Put more emphasis on making alliances with other oppressed groups and classes – anti-imperialist movements, workers’ organizations, the political parties of the left. They were engaged in a permanent dialogue – sometimes exhausting, sometimes exhilarating – with progressive men in these organizations about the meaning and importance of the feminist struggle, about the way gender oppression is reflected and reinforced within personal and family relationships – and within the very structure of liberation movements and parties. Liberal feminists – You girls always go too far! The problem is simply one of prejudice – the system needs to be corrected, not overturned. What we need is more equal-rights legislation, more positive role models to give girls confidence. A smaller group – concentrated on lobbying governments for pro-women reforms and trying to influence the decision makers. All too often, however they were fobbed off with declarations and resolutions that meant nothing in practice. p.121 – In the more conservative 1990s, there has been a growing together of different positions into a synthesis that recognizes some of the strengths and weaknesses in all three tendencies – and sees feminism as an ally of all human rights’ movements against militarism, authoritarianism and tyranny.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Introducing Feminism provides a concise guide to the history and development of feminism, as well as an introduction to some key women's issues including body image, pornography and rape. I absolutely adore the format of this series: Exploring complex, theoretical topics through non-fiction comic books. This unique narrative and presentation, mixing words and images, offers the reader a new and captivating non-fiction experience. Importantly, Introducing Feminism recognises intersectional femini Introducing Feminism provides a concise guide to the history and development of feminism, as well as an introduction to some key women's issues including body image, pornography and rape. I absolutely adore the format of this series: Exploring complex, theoretical topics through non-fiction comic books. This unique narrative and presentation, mixing words and images, offers the reader a new and captivating non-fiction experience. Importantly, Introducing Feminism recognises intersectional feminism, covering different experiences including black women's and lesbian liberation. However, this edition was published 20 years ago, and hence needs some updating towards the end. I believe a newer edition is available. All in all I loved reading this book and got emotional on several occasions. Women have come a long way, but our journey towards equality continues.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tani

    I got this years and years ago and just stopped reading in the middle because it wasn't working terribly well for me. But I left my bookmark in it, and I finally decided that I wanted it back. So I finished the book! It's fine as far as these things go, but I felt like the partially graphic format didn't work very well for me. I didn't feel like the art added anything. And as far as being a history, it just felt disjointed. I know it's a very broad overview, but maybe too broad for me. I don't k I got this years and years ago and just stopped reading in the middle because it wasn't working terribly well for me. But I left my bookmark in it, and I finally decided that I wanted it back. So I finished the book! It's fine as far as these things go, but I felt like the partially graphic format didn't work very well for me. I didn't feel like the art added anything. And as far as being a history, it just felt disjointed. I know it's a very broad overview, but maybe too broad for me. I don't know that I will retain much of anything from it. It does serve well as a sampler that might give you a good idea of a time period or subject that you'd like to learn more about. It also makes an attempt to be multicultural in its approach, although it still does focus primarily on the USA and Britain. So, not a bad effort, but not as good as I had hoped for.

  12. 5 out of 5

    CM

    An accessible primer to the history and idea. Heavier on the history side of things, especially the right to vote, but they are all stories important to the movement and a reader already deep in the theory might benefit from knowing more of the roots and origins behind an idea. Very much a narrative of multi-generational effort and a culture history of gender, from Mary Wollstonecraft to Margaret Thatcher. The coverage is mostly on the British and the American but it includes sketches of the mov An accessible primer to the history and idea. Heavier on the history side of things, especially the right to vote, but they are all stories important to the movement and a reader already deep in the theory might benefit from knowing more of the roots and origins behind an idea. Very much a narrative of multi-generational effort and a culture history of gender, from Mary Wollstonecraft to Margaret Thatcher. The coverage is mostly on the British and the American but it includes sketches of the movement around the globe. As usual, a list of reference is at the back of the book for further study.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fitri Wahyuningsih

    Buku pengantar yang umayan bagus lah untuk pemula seperti saya untuk memahami feminisme. Dalam buku ini dipaparkan secara singkat , padat, jelas mengenai perkembangan feminisme dari masa ke masa. Namun buku ini berfokus pda feminisme di 3 negara: Inggris, Prancis dan USA. Juga kita diperkenalkan tokoh2 Feminist awal seperi Mary Wolstoncraft, John Stuart Mills, Soujourner Truth, Olympe De Gourge dll. Intinua buku ini bagus sbg pengantar sebelum menyelami ttg feminisme lebih dalam. Nice.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mya

    When I read this book at 15 it pumped me the fuck up and I called myself a feminist from there on (until I was like 20 or whatever). 10 years later, rereading it with fresh eyes and a grown brain I actually feel like it is kinda biased.

  15. 5 out of 5

    امينة صالحي

    توقعت منه الكثير لكن للأسف خاب ظني معلومات مبعثرة غير متسلسلة و رسومات تافهة أحيانا..حتى ترجمة لم تكن جيدة

  16. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad

    أقدم لك أكتر كتاب فيه أخطاء إملائية تبدل المعنى تماما، وأخطاء في ترتيب الرسوم التوضيحية، وأخطاء في الصياغة ولا أكنها ترجمة جوجل.. والمصيبة إن في مراجعة علمية تمت، إلى جانب إن المراجع اللي قدم للكتاب، الدكتور الشهير، مقدمته نفسها لم تسلم من الأخطاء!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maisarah Mohd

    Feminisme untuk Pemula lebih banyak menceritakan perjuangan tokoh2 feminist dalam sejarah barat. Hanya ada sedikit diselitkan tokoh2 dari seluruh dunia dan menjelaskan secara ringkas aliran2 dlm gerakan feminisme. Walaubagaimanapun, memandangkan tajuknya sendiri 'untuk pemula' atau dalam versi Inggeris, 'Introducing', maka wajarlah isinya tidak menyeluruh, hanya di permukaan saja. Dan, untuk perbahasan feminisme yang lebih mendalam, boleh dicari di buku2 lain yang berkaitan feminisme.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mahdieh

    پشت کتاب نوشته: این کتاب مروری است بر تاریخچه نسبتاً کوتاه جنبش زنان، از بدو تولد آن در انقلاب 1789 فرانسه تا فراگیر شدن آن طی جنبش رهایی بخش زنان در دهه 70 میلادی و سپس بازگشت محافظه کاری در این زمینه در دوران تفوق نئولیبرالیسم. هدف آن، شناسایی دستاوردهای این جنبش و نیز چالش هایی است که هم اکنون نیز در قرن بیست و یکم این جنبش در سراسر جهان، هم به واسطه مقاومت های بیرونی و هم به دلیل مخالفت های درونی با آن رو به روست. . . . مشکل داشتم با ترجمه و ویرایش خیلی بد کتاب. با آمدن یک عالمه اسامی در آن و فق پشت کتاب نوشته: این کتاب مروری است بر تاریخچه نسبتاً کوتاه جنبش زنان، از بدو تولد آن در انقلاب 1789 فرانسه تا فراگیر شدن آن طی جنبش رهایی بخش زنان در دهه 70 میلادی و سپس بازگشت محافظه کاری در این زمینه در دوران تفوق نئولیبرالیسم. هدف آن، شناسایی دستاوردهای این جنبش و نیز چالش هایی است که هم اکنون نیز در قرن بیست و یکم این جنبش در سراسر جهان، هم به واسطه مقاومت های بیرونی و هم به دلیل مخالفت های درونی با آن رو به روست.‏ . . . مشکل داشتم با ترجمه و ویرایش خیلی بد کتاب. با آمدن یک عالمه اسامی در آن و فقط مختصر توضیحی درباره موضوعات.‏

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A really short and basic introduction to Feminist history, focused mainly on the U.S. and Western Europe. The book does not analyze feminist thoughts or currents, but defines the historical outline of the movement. If you open the book with that in mind you will not be disappointed, the illustration are numerous and usually fun.

  20. 4 out of 5

    goodreads

    At times seemed more like a list of names and dates rather than an exposition of feminist theory. There's 20 to 30 pages dedicated to detailing the names of similar activists whilst just a few given to Beauvoir and nothing arty all to Butler/Cixous/Irigaray. A quick read and fine for a (very) brief summary of the subject.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Louise Mcdonagh

    I could have done without it being quite so illustrated, but a great potted history of the Feminist movement and a great start from anyone interested in feminism.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nabilah

    This book introduced feminism in simple and accessible ways through the use of graphic arts. It is lovely. I am glad i bought it second hand.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    loved this. Very interesting and eye opening

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    One of the best introductions to feminism I have ever read--with pictures!! It covers feminism(s) globally, and while a bit dated now, highly recommended

  25. 4 out of 5

    Josafat Ituarte

    A must read to reflect an important aspect of the history and present of human society. Might be the most important pillar in the development of our future.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Fox

    I loved this book. It's really accessible - a great introduction to feminism.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gary Wing

  28. 5 out of 5

    عمران

  29. 5 out of 5

    Serena

  30. 5 out of 5

    Satkar Ulama

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