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Yo! Yes? PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Yo! Yes?
Author: Chris Raschka
Publisher: Published January 1st 2007 by Scholastic Inc. (first published March 1st 1993)
ISBN: 9780439921855
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

246936.Yo_Yes_.pdf

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An effective, unusual 34-word story of the beginnings of a friendship, accompanied by wild and wonderful illustrations. Against pastel backgrounds, in vibrant, colorful images, an African-American boy and a white boy meet on the street. [Their] one- and two-word exchanges on each spread lead to a tentative offer of friendship, sealed as both boys jump high in the air and y An effective, unusual 34-word story of the beginnings of a friendship, accompanied by wild and wonderful illustrations. Against pastel backgrounds, in vibrant, colorful images, an African-American boy and a white boy meet on the street. [Their] one- and two-word exchanges on each spread lead to a tentative offer of friendship, sealed as both boys jump high in the air and yell Yow!" With a beautifully balanced, economical style, the book illumines the peaks and pitfalls of getting acquainted, and puts in a good word for brotherhood as well." --School Library Journal, starred review

30 review for Yo! Yes?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    The illustrations of Chris Raschka's Yo! Yes? do not really appeal all that much to me on a personal and aesthetic level (while bright and lively, the facial expressions in particular do feel a bit overly vague and flatly washed-out), but I do have to absolutely and with pleasure admit that they do work exceedingly well with the sparse but effective text (mirroring its simplicity, but also somewhat expanding on the bare-bones printed words by also showing the changing emotions of the two lonely The illustrations of Chris Raschka's Yo! Yes? do not really appeal all that much to me on a personal and aesthetic level (while bright and lively, the facial expressions in particular do feel a bit overly vague and flatly washed-out), but I do have to absolutely and with pleasure admit that they do work exceedingly well with the sparse but effective text (mirroring its simplicity, but also somewhat expanding on the bare-bones printed words by also showing the changing emotions of the two lonely boys, from shyness, from surprise, to delight and joyful anticipation). And while Chris Raschka's presented narrative might, indeed, be almost ridiculously short (only thirty-four words and I counted), and is not really all that philosophically deep and probing, the important message of friendship and that making friends is both essential and often not even all that difficult if but the will and the desire for this are present, this shines with an eternal flame, brightly and sweetly. And while the last page of Yo! Yes? is by necessity and nature a bit open-ended with regard to the future progression of the two boys' emerging companionship, it does leave the distinct and positive, hopeful impression that there will now be fun and joyful playtimes for each, for both. Recommended! Now I do (and personally) find it somewhat off-putting to say the least that the book description of Yo! Yes? makes such a point that Chris Raschka is supposedly celebrating differences. and diversity Sorry, but EXCEPT for the cosmetic difference that one of the boys is African American and the other is Caucasian, there are really NO major differences between the two, but rather very many similarities (yes, the one child is a perhaps bit less shy and thus likely a bit more extroverted, but both are obviously lonely and in need of friendship and fun). And In my opinion, Yo? Yes! (aside from celebrating friendship) is therefore and first and foremost also a glowing paean to the fact that similarities usually outweigh differences and that the latter are often on the surface and thus only skin-deep (and therefore, in my humble opinion, the book description, somewhat and in error seems to focus on an idea that I do not really believe is in any way the main moral, the main theme presented by, featured in Yo! Yes?, as I personally feel both Chris Raschka's text and his illustrations mostly and primarily celebrate equivalences, demonstrate how most children are very much akin and alike, no matter what their ethnic backgrounds and cultures happens to be).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    Simple one or two-word sentences and lots of punctuation tell a tale of loneliness and friendship. Very basic, short and good for beginning readers. Our girls liked this story and could read it by themselves. This book was selected as one of the books for the November 2016- Caldecott Honor discussion at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Woody Calhoon

    Yo! Yes? Is not a bad book on its own, but for me, personally, I just really didn't get it. I understand that it is supposed to be a story about two kids from different backgrounds becoming friends, but the book made it really just feel like two people saying the word "hello" over and over again in a variety of different ways. The art helps tell the story a little bit, but I feel like its not done well enough to support the whole story. The story is supposed to show kids that being friends with Yo! Yes? Is not a bad book on its own, but for me, personally, I just really didn't get it. I understand that it is supposed to be a story about two kids from different backgrounds becoming friends, but the book made it really just feel like two people saying the word "hello" over and over again in a variety of different ways. The art helps tell the story a little bit, but I feel like its not done well enough to support the whole story. The story is supposed to show kids that being friends with people from different backgrounds is a good thing, but I feel this picture-book lacks enough substance to get that point across. I really wouldn't recommend this book unless you want a really, really, really simple book for your kids to get started with.

  4. 4 out of 5

    AleJandra

    Este libro es tan noventero. No se si de verdad fue escrito en los 90'S, pero tiene esa esencia. Una historia, manejada de una forma muy original. Sobre lo facil que puede ser hacer amigos. Cada pagina contiene oraciones cortas, a veces de una sola palabra. Con letras de gran tamaño. Que ayudan muchísimo cuando los niños apenas están aprendiendo a leer. Muy recomendable, libro multi-premiado, y lastimosamente lo encontré en las rebajas en una feria del libro.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    This is a very simple book for an early reader, with no page having more than two words (all dialog) on it. The story is really told in the illustrations. You can see so much from how the boys stand, how small or big their words are. Very sweet story... and at a level a five year old can easily read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    While I can see the value of this book for beginning readers and English language learners, it did not particularly appeal to me. The text is simple, two boys saying hello and beginning a friendship using just a few words. The illustrations are bright and help convey the meaning. However, I did not find either the text or illustrations appealing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    SaraLaLa

    If you like things to be overly concise, this is the book for you. With typically one (at most two) word(s) on a page, the author Chris Raschka tells about one boy who initially has no friends and then gets befriended by a second boy. Umm... the end.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Everything this man does is delightful, but this is my favorite.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Alvarez

    Yo!Yes? By Chris Raschaka is a Caldecott Honor Book and is a recommendation from the Association for Library Service to Children. Recommend for ages 3-5 This story is about two boys who end up being friends and communicate using few words. A shy boy is suddenly surprised, when an outgoing boy who is different from him, stops him and says "Yo!" and is unsure if he's talking to him. Soon, he shares with this stranger that he has no friends, but that stranger ends up offering his friendship to him. Yo!Yes? By Chris Raschaka is a Caldecott Honor Book and is a recommendation from the Association for Library Service to Children. Recommend for ages 3-5 This story is about two boys who end up being friends and communicate using few words. A shy boy is suddenly surprised, when an outgoing boy who is different from him, stops him and says "Yo!" and is unsure if he's talking to him. Soon, he shares with this stranger that he has no friends, but that stranger ends up offering his friendship to him. Although it hardly has any text, you can see how this friendship grows through the beautiful,colorful, and intriguing illustrations. It teaches that you can find a friend even with people who may look different from you, and with just a few words you can begin to connect with someone else. I think this is a good book to read with young children because even without many words, you can tell what the story is about through the illustrations. Children can even add on more words to their story if they want to because it is easy to understand what is going on. This would also be good to use with children who are new and come from other countries, because they often know what it's like to feel lonely and shy without a friend, and it might also encourage other children to offer kind words and offer a friendship to someone new. Chris Raschka uses watercolor and charcoal pencil in making his beautiful and vibrant illustrations, and although I prefer books with a little bit more text, I think this is a good book to read to preschoolers and Kindergarteners, especially when meeting new friends.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fjóla

    Minimalistic, but very cute! Two little boys strike a conversation through a handful of words. They're clearly not on the same page, when the story takes off, but their desire for a friend brings them together. So much is said in such few words. It's impressive. On the first reading my 3 1/2 year old was a little confused about what was going on (it's really an unconventional book, too), but the second time it really clicked for him. He even read it himself, with the correct intonations. I hadn' Minimalistic, but very cute! Two little boys strike a conversation through a handful of words. They're clearly not on the same page, when the story takes off, but their desire for a friend brings them together. So much is said in such few words. It's impressive. On the first reading my 3 1/2 year old was a little confused about what was going on (it's really an unconventional book, too), but the second time it really clicked for him. He even read it himself, with the correct intonations. I hadn't realized that, but this is a great lesson in punctuation and inflection. My son seemed to pick up himself what was implied with the exclamation and question marks, even the change in the size of the letters. The illustrations are pretty simple and sober, but very expressive. A lot can be read from the body language of the two boys. A very creative and touching book. Addendum: We've borrowed this one again and again. There something just so immensely satisfying about reading this book, so spare on words but rich in emotion. My son LOVES it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Pitchford

    This story uses barely any text to describe a beautiful message. "Yo! Yes?" is very simple book about a two boys conversation between each other. One boy simply wanted to offer friendship to the other boy. This book is a 1994 Caldecot Honor Book, and I'm pretty sure that is because the message of the book is reaching out to people who don't necessarily look like you and offering to be friends anyway. Throughout the entirety of the book the two unnamed characters remained on opposite sides of the This story uses barely any text to describe a beautiful message. "Yo! Yes?" is very simple book about a two boys conversation between each other. One boy simply wanted to offer friendship to the other boy. This book is a 1994 Caldecot Honor Book, and I'm pretty sure that is because the message of the book is reaching out to people who don't necessarily look like you and offering to be friends anyway. Throughout the entirety of the book the two unnamed characters remained on opposite sides of the of the book, at the end of the book (the last page to be exact) the two characters are shown celebrating their new friendship together on the same page. The illustrations are simple, and the text is large and bold. This book would be ideal for children in kindergarden. The use of different punctuation marks to express the remarks of the characters is another pinpoint for why this book is for younger children. They can learn the difference in reading a word with explanation marks and question marks.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen Wehage-Barrera

    Two boys of different races have a short question and answer conversation throughout the book. The words alone may confuse the reader, but when read with emphasis on punctuation and paired with the illustrations a deeper understanding occurs. Although their interaction is only one or two words at a time, the pictures show how their friendship develops. Companionship and loneliness are very relatable topics for people of all ages. The pictures are bright, colorful, and inviting leading to Yo! Yes Two boys of different races have a short question and answer conversation throughout the book. The words alone may confuse the reader, but when read with emphasis on punctuation and paired with the illustrations a deeper understanding occurs. Although their interaction is only one or two words at a time, the pictures show how their friendship develops. Companionship and loneliness are very relatable topics for people of all ages. The pictures are bright, colorful, and inviting leading to Yo! Yes? becoming a Caldecott Award winner in 1994. The target audience would be young pre-readers to early age independent readers: ages 2 - 6.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mari Miyagi

    This might be my favorite book this week. This book shows a black boy and a white boy having a conversation in just a few words like "Yes" "You?" "No friends." etc and it shows that their differences are overcome with those simple words. If there are newcomers who are new to the country in your classroom and they speak little English like simple words like this white boy, still those words have so many meanings behind them that are enough to convey their messages. This book might help other stud This might be my favorite book this week. This book shows a black boy and a white boy having a conversation in just a few words like "Yes" "You?" "No friends." etc and it shows that their differences are overcome with those simple words. If there are newcomers who are new to the country in your classroom and they speak little English like simple words like this white boy, still those words have so many meanings behind them that are enough to convey their messages. This book might help other students in the classroom understand newcomer English Learners and overcome differences and celebrate similarities to develop friendship.

  14. 4 out of 5

    SamZ

    1994 Caldecott Honor - Favorite Illustration: When the outgoing boy says "Yes, me!" and the timid boy replies "You!" I love the way the friendly boy is standing there with his arms on his head. So typical of small kids. This is a fun, very simple book that tells a great story about the value of making new friends. I love kids and the way they will simply run up to another kid and ask if they want to play and be friends. Often, they don't even ask names, they're just content to play together. It u 1994 Caldecott Honor - Favorite Illustration: When the outgoing boy says "Yes, me!" and the timid boy replies "You!" I love the way the friendly boy is standing there with his arms on his head. So typical of small kids. This is a fun, very simple book that tells a great story about the value of making new friends. I love kids and the way they will simply run up to another kid and ask if they want to play and be friends. Often, they don't even ask names, they're just content to play together. It usually makes me wonder how much better we'd be as adults if we were more willing to get along without having to know every detail about each other.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Zimmerman

    Yo! Yes? By Chris Raschka is a fun book about an African-American boy and a white boy meeting and their exchange by a couple words. The illustrations are very bright and colorful and show the development of their friendship. The stance of the boys is very repetitive but it shows a development of characters. They start on different ends of the page and end up next to each other by the end of the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Two boys navigate those first moments of a possible friendship: the "want to be my friend?" that's so hard to express. Raschka's illustrations capture the tension of the moment: one boy so outgoing and ready to take a risk, the other's body language showing his fear and self-doubt. This would make a good story for the beginning of the year in our school where one-third of our students are new each year.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Ruggirello

    This is a cute book about how a boy feels like he has no friends but then another boy tells him he is his friend. Would be good for a kindergarten or 1st grade class.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lana Clifton

    Two boys find friendship, despite their differences. This book emphasizes diversity, while punctuating inclusion. Pay special attention to reading with expression during read aloud. Students need to hear the difference between words being spoken as questions or exclamations.

  19. 4 out of 5

    June

    Raschka is a genius at telling a story with few words. I had forgotten about this one for my friendship programs. 8/14 Worked really well I with a preshool class today.

  20. 4 out of 5

    ABC

    This book shows two kids becoming friends.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sierra Watts

    This is an easy read, It shows how two strangers can become friends using a short conversation.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nea

    Yo! Yes? is a Caldecott Medal winner picture book for ages four to seven years old. Summary: The book tells of the meeting and new friendship created between a young African American boy and a young Caucasian boy. Evaluation: When I was young I didn't think deeply into to this book as I do now. Based on the language, its usually words repeated, one word dialogue and not anything too complicated. But, because of the meaning it can be used for students a little older. For me the book is so effecti Yo! Yes? is a Caldecott Medal winner picture book for ages four to seven years old. Summary: The book tells of the meeting and new friendship created between a young African American boy and a young Caucasian boy. Evaluation: When I was young I didn't think deeply into to this book as I do now. Based on the language, its usually words repeated, one word dialogue and not anything too complicated. But, because of the meaning it can be used for students a little older. For me the book is so effective because it tells of the new friendship built between two boys of different color. In the story color doesn't matter. The Caucasian boy is pretty much playing by himself while the African American boy plays with his basketball by himself. He's being looked a funny and kind of weird for dribbling the ball alone. The African American boy uses language popular in the African American culture like "yo!" used in a way to say "hey" or "hi" when addressing someone. While the Caucasian boys answers "yes?" without any hesitation but with a little confusion. The illustrations are important because the two boys dress way differently. The African American boys looks a little raggedy and not as clean as the Caucasian boy. He looks more neat and clean. All in all these two boys create an unlikely friendship out of kindness. They both just want a friend/someone to play with and the way they look doesn't matter to either of them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Mendieta

    Summary: This book is about a white Caucasian boy and an African american boy that encounter each other on the street.The book does not provide the names of the two main characters. Through their conversation, it is discovered that the Caucasian boy has no friends. They have simple one word conversations but by the end of the conversation they develop a friendship with one another. Evaluation: This is a great book to use for beginning readers. The whole story consists of one word responses. The Summary: This book is about a white Caucasian boy and an African american boy that encounter each other on the street.The book does not provide the names of the two main characters. Through their conversation, it is discovered that the Caucasian boy has no friends. They have simple one word conversations but by the end of the conversation they develop a friendship with one another. Evaluation: This is a great book to use for beginning readers. The whole story consists of one word responses. The font is really big and easy to read. Because the book only has one word sentences, the illustrations are key in understanding and comprehending the text. With this book, the illustrations tell the story more than the words do. Teaching idea: Looking at illustrations are important especially for emergent readers because it serves as a comprehension strategy. Read the book Yo! Yes? to your students WITHOUT showing the pictures in the book. Have a discussion with them. Where they able to understand the story? Why was it difficult? Explain to your students the importance of illustrations when reading. Illustrations aid the text in a story. Now, read the book again, but allowing students to focus and evaluate the illustrations.How did the pictures help them understand the story? Discuss.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Eric Carle is a crypto-fascist, brainwashing our children. How do I know this? Read the books; I'm not going to hold your hand while you learn what you must to survive the coming government crackdown. Suffice it to say I am in possession of certain knowledge that only a favored few are privileged to know. Look to The Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Lonely Firefly, and especially Pancakes, Pancakes, and you will behold the secret history of the 20th century, written in code. Who is behind the social Eric Carle is a crypto-fascist, brainwashing our children. How do I know this? Read the books; I'm not going to hold your hand while you learn what you must to survive the coming government crackdown. Suffice it to say I am in possession of certain knowledge that only a favored few are privileged to know. Look to The Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Lonely Firefly, and especially Pancakes, Pancakes, and you will behold the secret history of the 20th century, written in code. Who is behind the social engineering of our young, with the ultimate goal of creating the shock troops for a future fascist state? Obama is just a smokescreen, an errand boy sent by grocery clerks to collect a bill... Keep digging, you will find the Truth. Thank you. Please visit TheTruthAboutEricCarle.com, not currently functioning but soon to reveal critical information you must know.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Chris Raschka's "Yo! Yes?" is a fantastic illustrated depiction of a friendship forged between two children from different backgrounds. The two boys have quite different appearances (race, clothing, hairstyles, etc.), and yet they are able to become friends. While the illustrations are not incredibly detailed, they do appeal to a child's aesthetic and would allow any child to put themselves in the place of either of the characters. Children just learning to read will have complete access to the Chris Raschka's "Yo! Yes?" is a fantastic illustrated depiction of a friendship forged between two children from different backgrounds. The two boys have quite different appearances (race, clothing, hairstyles, etc.), and yet they are able to become friends. While the illustrations are not incredibly detailed, they do appeal to a child's aesthetic and would allow any child to put themselves in the place of either of the characters. Children just learning to read will have complete access to the story, since the pages only contain 1-2 words, permitting them to fully experience the message and theme. The body language of the characters is goofy and very realistic, which may help children who have trouble reading emotions of others. The emotions of the characters are expressed through the size of the text, as well, which is very clever. This Caldecott winner is as beautiful and engaging as it is simple.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Ellison

    This story is told through a conversation perspective. The two young boys in this book, are having a conversation because one boy approached the other and said “Yo!”. The one boy asked why the other was sad, and he said because he had no friends. The two boys became friends at the end of the conversation and it is a very sweet book. The illustrations through out the story show the two boys expressions and body language which helps the readers interpret the text easier, since it is such a short s This story is told through a conversation perspective. The two young boys in this book, are having a conversation because one boy approached the other and said “Yo!”. The one boy asked why the other was sad, and he said because he had no friends. The two boys became friends at the end of the conversation and it is a very sweet book. The illustrations through out the story show the two boys expressions and body language which helps the readers interpret the text easier, since it is such a short story. The pictures are very minimalistic and simple to go along with the theme the author is trying to present us with. The illustrations are nice but are repetitive like the story, and use all of the same colors. This also goes along with the theme of simplicity. I would read this to a classroom because I think the story teaches young children about diversity and kindness, and the illustrations depict the story perfectly.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Palermo

    Summary: Two children of difference races meet on the street. At first, the children struggle to understand what the other is trying to say, but by the end of the book the two boys become friends. Evaluation: I gave this book four stars because I found it be a thought provoking book. Students are required to think about what the two kids are saying to each other based on punctuation used in the book and the back ground knowledge the students have. More specifically, I enjoyed how the two boys body Summary: Two children of difference races meet on the street. At first, the children struggle to understand what the other is trying to say, but by the end of the book the two boys become friends. Evaluation: I gave this book four stars because I found it be a thought provoking book. Students are required to think about what the two kids are saying to each other based on punctuation used in the book and the back ground knowledge the students have. More specifically, I enjoyed how the two boys body language changed with the words they said based on how they were staying them. For example, both boys said the word "you", but meant it in different ways (question and statement). Teaching Idea: When using this book in the classroom, I feel like it would be good to use when learning sight words. The words in the story like "yes", "you", and "oh" are sight words that the students will need to learn, making this a good tool to bring into the classroom.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Xi Cai

    This is a great picture book for the early childhood education. First, the illustration of this book is very simple. The text and pictures were tight together. The first thing caught my eye is that there are two characters and they were expressing what they trying to say by a simple word. This book will attract children's attention because there is no much font but the words and the characters were interesting by looking at their facial expressions. One of the important factor to help children t This is a great picture book for the early childhood education. First, the illustration of this book is very simple. The text and pictures were tight together. The first thing caught my eye is that there are two characters and they were expressing what they trying to say by a simple word. This book will attract children's attention because there is no much font but the words and the characters were interesting by looking at their facial expressions. One of the important factor to help children to understand this book is by reading it out loud and be careful of the tone. Children will understand the elements overall the book by looking at the character's emotion and the words with punctuation. It is definitely a book for early childhood learning. The design among the text is simple but interesting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mia Tenijieth

    Despite the length and word word count of he book the story behind it was very positive in several ways. One being it was, in my opinion, very anti-bullying which is something that has been getting tons of support. Another positive message behind this story was the bonding of two children from different races. Although their dialect was not all that similar, it was the reason that they became friends (kind of out of confusion followed by clarification). Neither character acknowledged their physi Despite the length and word word count of he book the story behind it was very positive in several ways. One being it was, in my opinion, very anti-bullying which is something that has been getting tons of support. Another positive message behind this story was the bonding of two children from different races. Although their dialect was not all that similar, it was the reason that they became friends (kind of out of confusion followed by clarification). Neither character acknowledged their physical differences instead, they looked past it and immediately began a simple conversation which led to something wonderful! This would be a great book for young children and will allow them to interpret the story in their own way but ultimately emitting a positive message no matter how it is understood!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shreve

    Summary: In this simple but powerful story, a boy who has no friends meets a boy on the street. In one or two word sentences the boys must decide if they want to be friends. In this award winning, illustrated book, two boys will show you how a few words can make a big difference. Evaluation: I gave this book five stars. The illustrations at first glance seem like the heart of the book but the large and simple text holds a powerful message, easy for new readers to decode. I would recommend this b Summary: In this simple but powerful story, a boy who has no friends meets a boy on the street. In one or two word sentences the boys must decide if they want to be friends. In this award winning, illustrated book, two boys will show you how a few words can make a big difference. Evaluation: I gave this book five stars. The illustrations at first glance seem like the heart of the book but the large and simple text holds a powerful message, easy for new readers to decode. I would recommend this book to other teachers and parents. Teaching Point: I would use this book while teaching fluency. More specifically my focus would be on punctuation. You could read this book without acknowledging the punctuation and then reread it with the punctuation shown on each page. Have the students compare and contrast the two readings, and discuss why punctuation is so important.

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