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Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive
Author: Noah J. Goldstein
Publisher: Published June 10th 2008 by Free Press (first published 2008)
ISBN: 9781416570967
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Small changes can make a big difference in your powers of persuasion. What one word can you start using today to increase your persuasiveness by more than fifty percent? Which item of stationery can dramatically increase people's responses to your requests? How can you win over your rivals by inconveniencing them? Why does knowing that so many dentists are named Dennis improve Small changes can make a big difference in your powers of persuasion. What one word can you start using today to increase your persuasiveness by more than fifty percent? Which item of stationery can dramatically increase people's responses to your requests? How can you win over your rivals by inconveniencing them? Why does knowing that so many dentists are named Dennis improve your persuasive prowess? Every day we face the challenge of persuading others to do what we want. But what makes people say yes to our requests? Persuasion is not only an art, it is also a science, and researchers who study it have uncovered a series of hidden rules for moving people in your direction. Based on more than sixty years of research into the psychology of persuasion, Yes! reveals fifty simple but remarkably effective strategies that will make you much more persuasive at work and in your personal life, too. Cowritten by the world's most quoted expert on influence, Professor Robert Cialdini, Yes! presents dozens of surprising discoveries from the science of persuasion in short, enjoyable, and insightful chapters that you can apply immediately to become a more effective persuader. Why did a sign pointing out the problem of vandalism in the Petrified Forest National Park actually increase the theft of pieces of petrified wood? Why did sales of jam multiply tenfold when consumers were offered many fewer flavors? Why did people prefer a Mercedes immediately after giving reasons why they prefer a BMW? What simple message on cards left in hotel rooms greatly increased the number of people who behaved in environmentally friendly ways? Often counterintuitive, the findings presented in Yes! will steer you away from common pitfalls while empowering you with little-known but proven wisdom. Whether you are in advertising, marketing, management, or sales, or just curious about how to be more influential in everyday life, Yes! shows how making small, scientifically proven changes to your approach can have a dramatic effect on your persuasive powers.

30 review for Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dooley

    A good friend recommended this book one night over dinner and raised an interesting premise as to why he chose to read the subject matter: "I didn't read it to learn how to persuade people. I read it to learn how people were trying to persuade me." That concept resonated with me. Almost immediately, I purchased Yes! and added it to my Kindle. In effect, my friend's persuasive reasoning as to why I should read this book taught/reminded me the many number of ways that people are attempting to pers A good friend recommended this book one night over dinner and raised an interesting premise as to why he chose to read the subject matter: "I didn't read it to learn how to persuade people. I read it to learn how people were trying to persuade me." That concept resonated with me. Almost immediately, I purchased Yes! and added it to my Kindle. In effect, my friend's persuasive reasoning as to why I should read this book taught/reminded me the many number of ways that people are attempting to persuade me. Whether it is a lucrative advertising campaign, a co-worker, my boss, my friends, family or my wife, the number of different methods of persuasion are endless and everywhere. (Although, in my wife's case, a simple stern look often works!).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gordon

    The main author of this book is, I assume, Robert Cialdini, though it has two other co-authors. Cialdini is considered the godfather of the study of persuasion, or as he calls it, "influence". This book is a summary of his research in the field, nicely captured in only 232 pages. "Yes" is mainly targeted at the business reader, but I suspect that just about anyone who ever has to use persuasion or exert influence would find it useful. His six principles of effective persuasion and influence are: 1 The main author of this book is, I assume, Robert Cialdini, though it has two other co-authors. Cialdini is considered the godfather of the study of persuasion, or as he calls it, "influence". This book is a summary of his research in the field, nicely captured in only 232 pages. "Yes" is mainly targeted at the business reader, but I suspect that just about anyone who ever has to use persuasion or exert influence would find it useful. His six principles of effective persuasion and influence are: 1) Reciprocation: You scratch my back, I'll scratch yours. Lobbyists understand this very well. 2) Appeals to authority: We tend to trust the opinions of reputed experts. Personally, I always check the flattering one-liner book reviews that are almost always printed on the back cover or the first page of any book I'm considering buying. The New York Times or Washington Post loved it? There's a pretty good chance I'll buy it. 3) Scarcity: Exemplified in the phrase "get it while it lasts -- supplies are going fast!" 4) Values and consistency: Most of us like to be consistent with our proclaimed values -- which is why "family values" appeals in US politics are so effective, however contrived they may seem. In fact, these often trump economic self-interest, which helps to explain why so many low-income people vote Republican. 5) Liking: We tend to believe and do business with people we like. 6) Social proof: 65% of guests in this hotel re-use their towels instead of having them changed every day? Guess I'd better do the same. Stated this way, the principles seem pretty self-evident. The real power of the book lies in citing lots and lots of example of how to put them into practice. And his examples are well-supported with references to the scientific literature in the field. All in all, this is a great read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tomas Ramanauskas

    Title promises things it doesn't deliver. You won't learn a lot about persuasion, but you'll know a few real life behaviorism anecdotes to tell to your friends during dinner. Especially, about what three words can deliver fortune and why hotels get the environmental towel message wrong. A light, quick airport read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Jaden

    If you want to learn about persuasion, then Robert Cialdini is your man. However, I wasn't quite as enamored with Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive as I was when I first read Cialdini's ground-breaking Influence many years ago. Yes!, which is co-authored by Noah Goldstein and Steve Martin (not the actor), is a collection of fifty persuasion techniques. Each technique is based on at least one psychology study, and all of the studies are listed in a chapter-by-chapter basis in th If you want to learn about persuasion, then Robert Cialdini is your man. However, I wasn't quite as enamored with Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive as I was when I first read Cialdini's ground-breaking Influence many years ago. Yes!, which is co-authored by Noah Goldstein and Steve Martin (not the actor), is a collection of fifty persuasion techniques. Each technique is based on at least one psychology study, and all of the studies are listed in a chapter-by-chapter basis in the book’s Notes section. This section alone makes the book a good resource for those who want to delve further into persuasion research. However, because the book never really digs into the psychology research itself, I wouldn't consider Yes! to be a scientific book. I consider it to be a business book before anything else, if for no other reason than each of the 50 entries provides an example of how to apply persuasion techniques to the business setting. This, I think, was actually the book's strength. Where Yes! fell short in scientific inquiry, it made up for in business insight. With that said, I didn’t learn anything new from this book. I found some of the business examples insightful not because the material was new, but because the material was presented in a new light. (In other words, I was already aware of these persuasion techniques; I just didn’t think of them all in terms of a business setting before.) I’m well-read in social psychology so I might not be the best yardstick, but I have a hunch that most with a fair amount of knowledge in this field would feel the same way. Even though I was personally disappointed with this book, I would still recommend it to a person who was interested in learning about persuasion. With a couple of caveats. First, I would assume this person knows nothing or very little about this topic. And secondly, I would make sure this person knew not to expect something along the lines of Daniel Pink or Jonah Lehrer, which is to say this person shouldn’t expect a pop psychology book with substance. Yes! is a good starting off point, but nothing more.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alya

    I find it a bit uncomfortable how I have this book 2 stars, despite it serving its purpose and explaining the methodology in a fairly good way. However, I found myself getting bored halfway through and I couldn't wait to finish and rid of it. The writing style was dull and it affected my overall reading experience sadly.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    From the time I discovered How to Win Friends and Influence People, I've been interested in learning about the power of persuasion. How to ethically make someone agree with you. Whether or not any of the techniques are put into place, this is an interesting book for anyone interested in psychology. It discusses things like why some PSAs have the opposite results than the ones intended -- more litterers, more energy use, more natural resources stolen -- why post-it notes really get people's atten From the time I discovered How to Win Friends and Influence People, I've been interested in learning about the power of persuasion. How to ethically make someone agree with you. Whether or not any of the techniques are put into place, this is an interesting book for anyone interested in psychology. It discusses things like why some PSAs have the opposite results than the ones intended -- more litterers, more energy use, more natural resources stolen -- why post-it notes really get people's attention and cooperation, and why restaurants should ditch their baskets of mints if they want bigger tips for their servers. Fun read and I tortured my husband by sharing many tidbits!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steven Wedgeworth

    This book is more about sales and marketing than speaking (or preaching). It has some helpful advice, but a lot of it is fairly intuitive or commonly known (in my experience, at least). It's not written in an overly entertaining and engaging way, and I'm not sure you'd ever need to re-read it. Not bad, but not amazing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mel Kettle

    Had some great ideas but wasn't as good as I expected. Is a good book to dip in and out of.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Saikhnaa Ch

    Collection of 50 short stories on how to get Yes ethically. Highly recommend for anyone to read. Some good strategies to try on, some good ones which you are tried on at some point of life, etc. will do longer review later this month.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt Hutson

    I hope you enjoy the review and pick up the book somewhere. Enjoy the picture of my daughter too! Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive By: Noah J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin and Robert B. Cialdini BookMattic's Rating: 5/5 Stars Goodreads' Rating: 3.97/5 Stars 'Yes!' Is a very persuasive book that is all about persuading people! If you want to learn more about how people are persuaded not just directly but also indirectly and some simple tips that you can apply for almost anything in any I hope you enjoy the review and pick up the book somewhere. Enjoy the picture of my daughter too! Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive By: Noah J. Goldstein, Steve J. Martin and Robert B. Cialdini BookMattic's Rating: 5/5 Stars Goodreads' Rating: 3.97/5 Stars 'Yes!' Is a very persuasive book that is all about persuading people! If you want to learn more about how people are persuaded not just directly but also indirectly and some simple tips that you can apply for almost anything in any situation then 'Yes!' Is a perfect read for you. The chapters in 'Yes!' are clearly laid out giving you 50 scientifically proven ways to be persuasive just as it promises in the sub-title of the book. The 50 chapters are on average 3 or 4 pages long and are concise in giving you the persuasion tip and how it could be possibly used in a few different situations. I would say I found about half of the tips to be applicable in my daily life and the other half I could possibly learn from or use in future situations. You may think from just looking at this title that this book is only for business marketers or managers, but I found it particularly helpful in situations such as talking to my students, or even trying to convince my wife to let me buy a home theater sound system that I have been wanting to buy for a long time. And you may be worrying about having to memorize 50 different persuasion techniques. Well, I wouldn't worry about that because some of the techniques are somewhat repetitive, which isn't a bad thing since our brains are wired to remember things that we hear, read or see over and over. The authors and researchers did a fantastic and thorough job of putting this together for anyone ranging from housewife or househusband to used car sells person all the way even to the president of the United States. You'll definitely learn that if you use the right tools when persuading someone that you can, unbeknownst to them, persuade them to do what you desire.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Yoak

    I don't normally comment on books in progress, but this one has a terrible snake oil start to it. You might think that "Yes!" is the important word in the title, but the author makes it very clear that it is "scientifically." He makes a point of telling us, probably 50 times, that this is science. Science. SCIENCE! It's a shame with so much science on this topic, that everyone ignores it. No need to take his word on this, this is science! Et ceterea and at unfortunate length. When he finally bro I don't normally comment on books in progress, but this one has a terrible snake oil start to it. You might think that "Yes!" is the important word in the title, but the author makes it very clear that it is "scientifically." He makes a point of telling us, probably 50 times, that this is science. Science. SCIENCE! It's a shame with so much science on this topic, that everyone ignores it. No need to take his word on this, this is science! Et ceterea and at unfortunate length. When he finally broaches his first topic, social proof, the content does seem interesting, but I suspect this is one of those books I'll have to grit my teeth through to get what value it has instead of being a simple joy to read. ... When I got back to it, the style was just more than I could stand. There is some useful information early in the book about social proof and avoiding a "magnetic middle" but it just felt like an infomercial to me and got progressively harder to listen to. Eventually I had to give up. If you can tolerate the style, there are probably some things to learn here. Perhaps it is better in paper.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eric Montag

    This was a fascinating book. What I liked most about it was the fact that each of the 50 items mentioned was backed up by science. The book is not just a collection of things that sound like they would probably work. For most of the 50 "secrets," the book gives a brief description of the experiment that was designed to test the secret's validity. The description of each secret was not overly long, and provided just enough information to satisfy my curiosity. Definitely worth a read for anyone wh This was a fascinating book. What I liked most about it was the fact that each of the 50 items mentioned was backed up by science. The book is not just a collection of things that sound like they would probably work. For most of the 50 "secrets," the book gives a brief description of the experiment that was designed to test the secret's validity. The description of each secret was not overly long, and provided just enough information to satisfy my curiosity. Definitely worth a read for anyone who would like to understand how to be more persuasive.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laila Al Mulki

    الكتاب يعرض مجموعة من النصائح لتسويق منتجك أو فكرتك، قرأت ملخصه للرائع رؤوف شبايك. ضروري جداً كمنتج أن تدرس التسويق ولكن من المفيد كمستهلك أيضاً أن تكتشف خفايا عالم التسويق لتتعلم الأساليب التي تستخدمها الشركات في إقناعك لشراء منتجها.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hesham Barakat

    Not bad, put i would recommend to read Influence: Pshycology of persuasion instead, as the core of the 2 books are almost identical

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Badghaish

    بشكل بسيط ومختصر, 50 طريقة للإقناع أو للتسويق بشكل أكبر رائع الكتاب لمن يهتم بافتتاح مشروع شخصي

  16. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Lasensky

    A must read for any business person. The consumer behavior examples in this book can be applied to any industry or job.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I think influence will be better. Some interesting stuff. Quotes: "six universal principles of social influence: reciprocation (we feel obligated to return favors performed for us), authority (we look to experts to show us the way), commitment/consistency (we want to act consistently with our commitments and values), scarcity (the less available the resource, the more we want it), liking (the more we like people, the more we want to say yes to them), and social proof (we look to what others to do g I think influence will be better. Some interesting stuff. Quotes: "six universal principles of social influence: reciprocation (we feel obligated to return favors performed for us), authority (we look to experts to show us the way), commitment/consistency (we want to act consistently with our commitments and values), scarcity (the less available the resource, the more we want it), liking (the more we like people, the more we want to say yes to them), and social proof (we look to what others to do guide our behavior). "When people are uncertain about a course of action, they tend to look outside themselves and to other people around them to guide their decisions and actions." "labeling technique, involves assigning a trait, attitude, belief, or other label to a person, and then making a request of that person consistent with that label." "Arguing against your self-interest, which can include mentioning a drawback of your arguments, proposals, or products, creates the perception that you and your organization are honest and trustworthy. This puts you in a position to be more persuasive when promoting your genuine strengths...be sure to follow your discussion of a drawback with a positive aspect that's related to, and that neutralizes, the drawback." "People will be more likely to stick with programs and tasks if you can first offer them some evidence of how they've already made progress toward completing them."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    I love Cialdini's Influence book, but this one left me cold. It's written as 50 two page essays, rather like an anthology of blog posts. Consequently it doesn't dive deep into anything, just presents 50 case studies or psych studies showing an aspect of influence and suggests how they might be used in a modern business. I was frustrated by the lack of detail--all too often we heard about something awesome ("X made people buy more") but didn't learn how much more, how many people, or what might n I love Cialdini's Influence book, but this one left me cold. It's written as 50 two page essays, rather like an anthology of blog posts. Consequently it doesn't dive deep into anything, just presents 50 case studies or psych studies showing an aspect of influence and suggests how they might be used in a modern business. I was frustrated by the lack of detail--all too often we heard about something awesome ("X made people buy more") but didn't learn how much more, how many people, or what might negate the effect. On the surface fascinating, but it fails to deliver the depth needed. However, if you enjoy reading about cognitive biases and influence, and don't mind doing more reading for the depth, this is a good source of pointers for further research.

  19. 4 out of 5

    MsSmartiePants ...like the candy...

    I've had this book on my list for a while now and am pleased to have been able to check it out today from All Ears Audio Books. This book is an overview of psychological patterns associated with positive Yes!-type of statements. In tweaking presentations very slightly, we can improve our success in eliciting others to purchase, agree, take action, or other choices. The techniques taught within this book are ethical and moral, so no manipulation or taking advantage of others for our own benefit i I've had this book on my list for a while now and am pleased to have been able to check it out today from All Ears Audio Books. This book is an overview of psychological patterns associated with positive Yes!-type of statements. In tweaking presentations very slightly, we can improve our success in eliciting others to purchase, agree, take action, or other choices. The techniques taught within this book are ethical and moral, so no manipulation or taking advantage of others for our own benefit is sanctioned. Really a great review on practical ways to use (and avoid!) to gain a positive response.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Juan

    On method #25, so far the methods are interesting, and I've had the opportunity to use some of them...but the authors try to be too clever. Chapters are labeled with questions such as "When does a bonus become an onus?", "Does it behave like bread or like wine?" and "How can you become a Jedi master of persuasion?". Sometimes the chapters are filled with so much anecdotal information regarding the sociological studies done to support their methods that you're not even sure what the method is! The On method #25, so far the methods are interesting, and I've had the opportunity to use some of them...but the authors try to be too clever. Chapters are labeled with questions such as "When does a bonus become an onus?", "Does it behave like bread or like wine?" and "How can you become a Jedi master of persuasion?". Sometimes the chapters are filled with so much anecdotal information regarding the sociological studies done to support their methods that you're not even sure what the method is! The authors provide valuable information but they should have been more straightforward. After I am done I am going to list the 50 methods without all the anecdotes for my own reference.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pubudu Wariyapola

    A reasonably good pop-psych book - written by Goldstein, but (I guess) with help from Caldini and Martin (director of Caldini's UK office). A very cursory treatment of a variety of influence techniques - with some research cited, but not in-depth enough to truly understand the science behind the recommendations. Often moves from the science to speculation and theory - and even when scientific research is cited often misconstrues correlation/causation and/or overly generalizes the research to make A reasonably good pop-psych book - written by Goldstein, but (I guess) with help from Caldini and Martin (director of Caldini's UK office). A very cursory treatment of a variety of influence techniques - with some research cited, but not in-depth enough to truly understand the science behind the recommendations. Often moves from the science to speculation and theory - and even when scientific research is cited often misconstrues correlation/causation and/or overly generalizes the research to make a easy-to-digest point/soundbite. Would recommend as a quick survey-type read to be followed by going into the actual research in the footnotes/appendix.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    Awesome book! All 50 ways were presented in a very simple way to leading from understanding the general principle behind the idea and the practical application. Every single one of these 50 ways is based on actual studies and has evidence to support the the psychology behind it. The lessons from this book will seriously amp up your influence and without doubt make you a very compelling person with the ability to shape the behavior of others around you. Read the book and use this stuff with cauti Awesome book! All 50 ways were presented in a very simple way to leading from understanding the general principle behind the idea and the practical application. Every single one of these 50 ways is based on actual studies and has evidence to support the the psychology behind it. The lessons from this book will seriously amp up your influence and without doubt make you a very compelling person with the ability to shape the behavior of others around you. Read the book and use this stuff with caution! :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I really liked this book, because I am a firm believer in short chapters that are intriguing, and that is what this book offers. I also love how well-researched it is, so that you know the methods actually lead to a statistic difference in persuasion. Some of these methods of persuasion will shock you, and you will find some of them creeping into your life as you try to convince people of your message.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I did think that Cialdini's famous "Influence" was more valuable for studying the underlying principles in depth, and would highly recommend that book to anyone. "Yes!" covers much of the same material more briefly. However this is still a quick and interesting read, with some great examples. One of the chapters in this book helped us boost response rates by around 20% with a simple change to our marketing!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Conrey

    Good short snippets as reminders. Would be great as a 50 track audio book or similar that you could listen to a randome one a day if you're into that sort of thing. Builds on a ton of other sources that you've likely already read if you are in sales or psychology. A good refresher/reminder but not a great standalone

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chad Allen

    This is the watered-down crappy version of Influence, which is a fine book. Read Influence and skip this. Also note that it's not the same book as "Getting to Yes" which is also a fine book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matt Fox

    It's a rehash of Influence chunked into smaller pieces. Read Influence by Cialdini instead. Same stories, better quality information.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hoonie

    The author of this book is smart I think, Good job ~!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    Comment deleted: It was brought to my attention that I posted a comment for a different book here.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I was excited to read this book as Influence by Cialdini is a top 5 book of mine. While this is a good book, it didn't offer much insight beyond Influence and is almost redundant. Like Influence, this book is about making small changes to the way requests are made as to get drastically different results. This is a book of examples/anecdotes which exemplify and validate what I consider to be the original, Influence and if you've already read it, you can skip this one. Here are some examples: -Peop I was excited to read this book as Influence by Cialdini is a top 5 book of mine. While this is a good book, it didn't offer much insight beyond Influence and is almost redundant. Like Influence, this book is about making small changes to the way requests are made as to get drastically different results. This is a book of examples/anecdotes which exemplify and validate what I consider to be the original, Influence and if you've already read it, you can skip this one. Here are some examples: -People value of favour more immediately following and it degrades over time. After receiving a favour you should immediately be very grateful. The best time for reciprocation is immediately after giving a favour -Foot-in-the-door technique: gain compliance for with a small request that is similar to the larger request to come later. In sales, this is a small initial purchase. With children getting them to help you do their homework or clean their room before asking them to do it themselves -Labeling technique (careful this can backfire when not used with caution) label kids as hard working because they will want to behave in accordance with that label -remind your clients that you appreciate them by saying I know you can choose other providers and you appreciate that they chose you -Ask someone to predict that they will behave in a positive way and they will be much more likely to do so for example ask your kids "do you think you will do your homework tomorrow?" and they'll be much more likely to do so if they answer yes in advance -In order to improve a relationship with someone ask them to do you a very small favour and then they'll want to behave consistently afterwards -Asking for a very small amount will greatly increase the likelihood of compliance -In order to convey your expertise and credentials without coming across like a know-it-all or a show-off have someone else introduce you and read your bio the audience will be more receptive to it -If you have to acknowledge a shortcoming follow it up immediately with a benefit that is related -When admitting you're wrong about something admit that it was due to something that was internal and controllable so that people will have confidence that it won't happen again -People are more likely to comply with your request if they share generalities with you for example of similar name same hometown same alma mater -People are more receptive to things that sound like their name or start with the same letter as their name so when writing a proposal or a strategy for a client name it with something that starts with the same letter as their name or that sounds like their name -People are much more receptive if you mirror their behaviours for example repeating verbatim as a confirmation -Accompany your requests with the word because and a sound reason this will make a surprising increase compliance -Important that your message and the names of your products and services are easy to say and read so name your product simply and whenever writing a handwritten message make it very easy to read -People are more motivated to complete a task if they are already en route so when you ask someone for a favor point out that they've already made progress towards it -Using irrelevant and imaginative names for projects can make them compelling so for example if you're trying to get people motivated to do a project at work call it something interesting like the fascinator project or the Kermit project -Mirrors make it much less likely that people will behave poorly so put mirrors in places where your children are more likely to do something inappropriate -Caffeine makes people more receptive to your messaging so it's always good to make presentations first thing in the morning and never right after lunch alternatively serve coffee for your presentation keeping in mind that it takes 40 minutes for caffeine to kick in -Important to know the difference in cultures when it comes to influence: Western countries are more individualistic while Eastern countries are more collectivistic

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