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A Bit on the Side PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: A Bit on the Side
Author: William Trevor
Publisher: Published September 27th 2005 by Penguin Books (first published January 1st 2004)
ISBN: 9780143035916
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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In these twelve stories, a waiter divulges a shocking life of crime to his ex-wife; a woman repeats the story of her parents’ unstable marriage after a horrible tragedy; a schoolgirl regrets gossiping about the cuckolded man who tutors her; and, in the volume’s title story, a middle-aged accountant offers his reasons for ending a love affair. At the heart of this ... colle In these twelve stories, a waiter divulges a shocking life of crime to his ex-wife; a woman repeats the story of her parents’ unstable marriage after a horrible tragedy; a schoolgirl regrets gossiping about the cuckolded man who tutors her; and, in the volume’s title story, a middle-aged accountant offers his reasons for ending a love affair. At the heart of this ... collection is Trevor’s characteristic tenderness and unflinching eye for both the humanizing and dehumanizing aspects of modern urban and rural life.

30 review for A Bit on the Side

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim Fonseca

    Twelve short stories; all good and one masterpiece, the title story kept till the end. “Something was different this morning; on the walk from Chiltern Street she had sensed, for an instant only, that their love affair was not as it had been yesterday.” In the blurbs, one from the New Yorker, in which Trevor published most of these stories over the years, one critic said “Trevor is probably the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language.” Well, Trevor is gone now, but he’s c Twelve short stories; all good and one masterpiece, the title story kept till the end. “Something was different this morning; on the walk from Chiltern Street she had sensed, for an instant only, that their love affair was not as it had been yesterday.” In the blurbs, one from the New Yorker, in which Trevor published most of these stories over the years, one critic said “Trevor is probably the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language.” Well, Trevor is gone now, but he’s certainly excellent as a short story writer and as a novelist. As with his novels, many of the subjects are lonely people, and almost all are leading drab, confined, constrained lives. In one titled “Solitude,” we learn how a young girl became a friendless old lady, living in hotels across Europe, her only acquaintances maids, cooks, bar tenders and bell hops. In “On the Streets,” a friendless divorced man stalks his former wife. (Married five months – was that a mistake?). He’s a waiter, fixated on and obsessed by a single incident at work for which he was criticized a long time ago. In “The Dancing-Master’s Music,” a maid at an inn spends her whole life (from age 14 to retirement) working at the inn and reflecting back on a single musical performance. (I’m reminded of another Trevor character, a young man in Silence of the Garden, who goes to see a traveling knife-throwing act as a boy and that seems to end up being the highlight of his life.) In “Graillis’s Legacy,” a widower, a small town librarian, rejects a substantial inheritance as inappropriate, coming from a woman, a former library patron he knew. It’s as if he worries that it might offend --- who? His dead wife? Understatement is a strength of Trevor’s prose as in this passage about the village priest from “Justina’s Priest.” “He had seen his congregations fall off and struggled against the feeling that he’d been deserted. Confusion spread from the mores of the times into the Church itself; in combating it, he prayed for guidance but was not heard.” He speaks of a young woman wearing a shirt “with an indecency on it.” (The shirt said “F--- Me.”) In this story the priest intervenes with a young, mentally deficient woman’s family to warn them that she might run off to Dublin with the girl wearing the T-shirt. A few stories involve couples and married people. (Happily? Of course not, where would the story be?) In “Big Bucks,” a young woman is engaged to a man who goes to America and they plan that she will follow him. Is she in love with him or with a dream of the distant continent? In “Sitting with the Dead,” the middle-aged Geraghty sisters arrive at the homes of the dead and dying (whether they know you or not). One woman, a widow since the night before, reveals to them a lot more than she intended. Young people would say TMI – too much information! Great stories! Irish village from sites.nd.edu/oblation Photo of the author from avondhupress.ie

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5 Although this author is rather new to me, there is something that attracts in his writing. He seems to have such a firm grasp of time and place, setting detailed scenes and situations. In his portrayal of people, he treats them with both tenderness and respect. In these short stories, the connecting thread seems to be loss, whether of self, a friend, a way of life, even faith. The first story, Sitting with the dead, is probably the strongest and the desolation and melancholy of this woman, w 3.5 Although this author is rather new to me, there is something that attracts in his writing. He seems to have such a firm grasp of time and place, setting detailed scenes and situations. In his portrayal of people, he treats them with both tenderness and respect. In these short stories, the connecting thread seems to be loss, whether of self, a friend, a way of life, even faith. The first story, Sitting with the dead, is probably the strongest and the desolation and melancholy of this woman, who has now lost her husband is stirring. Yet, as we find out, she lost something much more valuable long ago. The story that has stayed with me though is called, Justina's Priest, a young woman, of lower intelligence who is living with her elder sister, her one and only friend having moved away. She helps out the local priest by caring for the church and he is used to seeing her there. He is having a crisis of faith, wondering what his, life means, when Justina receives a letter from her friend. How this scenario plays out is the story and for me a memorable one. Nice, pleasant stories, meaningful showing a wonderful grasp of people and their varied circumstances.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    “My mother had died. And my father would die, too. And Charles, too. And I would eventually die, as well, and who would be left to tell the story?” William Trevor is certainly one of the greatest writers of short stories in the English language. He has to be mentioned in the same sentence as James Joyce, whose Dubliners is one of the great collections ever, and which Trevor acknowledges some debt. Chekhov is another master Trevor admires, and he is a writer in the Chekhovian tradition, telling qu “My mother had died. And my father would die, too. And Charles, too. And I would eventually die, as well, and who would be left to tell the story?” William Trevor is certainly one of the greatest writers of short stories in the English language. He has to be mentioned in the same sentence as James Joyce, whose Dubliners is one of the great collections ever, and which Trevor acknowledges some debt. Chekhov is another master Trevor admires, and he is a writer in the Chekhovian tradition, telling quiet, understated of ordinary, often marginalized people. Maybe we can think of other writers we also admire like him: Edna O’Brien, Alice Munro? I have read several of his individual stories, and only three or four of his books, but I listened to this, his tenth collection of stories, as I awaited his Selected Stories, which I will now slow read over the next 2-3 months. A Bit on The Side is a collection of twelve short stories; all beautifully done, with two or three masterpieces. Here’s the opening of the title story: “Something was different this morning; on the walk from Chiltern Street she had sensed, for an instant only, that their love affair was not as it had been yesterday.” These are quiet, subtle stories, of quiet people: Walking home, a young woman is “grateful for the moonlight.” Two women are “united as friends in their childlessness, wedded in the depth of their sadness.” In “The Dancing-Master’s Music,” a maid at an inn spends her whole life recalling a single musical performance as the highlight of her life. Trevor has deep and understated sympathy for his characters, as in the opening story, "Sitting with the Dead,” where a woman, after more than twenty years of an abusive and very private marriage, finds him dead. Two elderly sisters in this small Irish village come to pay their respects, to “sit with the dead,” though most people avoided this couple. The woman so needs comfort, and they are able to provide a very small measure of it, never having met her. There are people who have never said what they wanted to say, "because there was too little to explain, not too much." A few of the stories deal with adultery, though there’s so much surprising grace and kindness, not bitterness and rancor. Forgiveness! In the title piece, Trevor writes simply of two middle-aged lovers, both married to others, though she is getting a divorce, in London. The affair is conducted with reserve and dignity, though he feels guilty, feeling he is ruining her life. She insists she is happy, doesn’t mind that others see her as his “bit on the side.” Sad, and understated, and powerful. Humility and compassion in the best of Trevor’s stories make them so moving.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    Can a writer be both clinical and sympathetic toward his characters? I think he can and I believe Trevor has done both in this collection. I've read other stories by Trevor that I've liked more, but I still liked this collection quite a bit. After finishing a story, I'd page back to see how he employs his craft, such deceptively simple details leading toward a cohesive whole. I especially enjoyed the stories that alternated between two characters' viewpoints: "An Evening Out," "On the Streets" a Can a writer be both clinical and sympathetic toward his characters? I think he can and I believe Trevor has done both in this collection. I've read other stories by Trevor that I've liked more, but I still liked this collection quite a bit. After finishing a story, I'd page back to see how he employs his craft, such deceptively simple details leading toward a cohesive whole. I especially enjoyed the stories that alternated between two characters' viewpoints: "An Evening Out," "On the Streets" and the title story, though what the 'narrator-author' sees at the end of it is what's the most poignant. But I was also impressed with "Solitude," which is told by an elderly woman whose life is defined by an incident from her childhood. Actually, as I write this and look back at the titles, I can find something in each that touched me. For the reader, perhaps nothing momentous happens in most of these stories, but to the characters, what is being relayed are those moments that determine the course of a life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    The voice is still Trevor, a voice I love and one that soothes me; yet these pieces were surprisingly uneven or incomplete. Some sounded re-used. I loved, though, the first story, Sitting with the Dead, about two sisters who come visit when there's a death in the family. They make the tea, offer banalities, and the recent widow opens up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    A BIT ON THE SIDE. (2004). William Trevor. ****. This is a collection of twelve short stories by Trevor, most of which had appeared previously in ‘The New Yorker’ magazine. The author is a writer of analytic bent. Passions, feelings, and any raw emotions rarely make their way into his stories. That is not to say that they are not there, but they are there so that the characters can look and think about them objectively. These tales have little in common with each other, although extramarital or o A BIT ON THE SIDE. (2004). William Trevor. ****. This is a collection of twelve short stories by Trevor, most of which had appeared previously in ‘The New Yorker’ magazine. The author is a writer of analytic bent. Passions, feelings, and any raw emotions rarely make their way into his stories. That is not to say that they are not there, but they are there so that the characters can look and think about them objectively. These tales have little in common with each other, although extramarital or otherwise off-centered relationships have a significant starring role in many of them. The title story revolves around the breakup of a couple who were not married to each other; the reason being that the male half of the duo didn’t like the woman being talked about as his ‘bit on the side.’ Although critics seem to like comparing this author with Chekov, I class him more in the style of John Updike. Maybe that’s why he has been so prominent in ‘The New Yorker’. I found all of these stories to be very good, although I particularly liked “Justina’s Priest,” and “Sitting With the Dead.” I’m sure you will find your own favorites. Recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    not the best Trevor collection: a couple of stories seemed tired, almost like offcuts. However there were some just great, some that grew on me, and some standard Trevor (ie engaging, compassionate, observant, true). This was published in 2004, they could all have been written 20 years earlier (apart from an odd detail here and there: Pret a Manger in one, for example).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bettie☯

    http://bettie.booklikes.com/blog

  9. 5 out of 5

    Henry Jefferies

    Very well written, hence the stars, but too formal and sometimes too sad to enjoy!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Wow. I can't even begin to describe how thoroughly I enjoyed William Trevor's story collection A Bit on the Side. Trevor's prose is simply beautiful, and impeccably crafted. There's no clever wordplay here, no dizzying metaphors or whipsaw plot twists, no implausibly witty characters. Just everyday people living quiet, modest, lonely and often regretful lives in an Ireland of the modern era but which could easily have been fifty or a hundred years ago. The settings are vividly drawn--pubs which Wow. I can't even begin to describe how thoroughly I enjoyed William Trevor's story collection A Bit on the Side. Trevor's prose is simply beautiful, and impeccably crafted. There's no clever wordplay here, no dizzying metaphors or whipsaw plot twists, no implausibly witty characters. Just everyday people living quiet, modest, lonely and often regretful lives in an Ireland of the modern era but which could easily have been fifty or a hundred years ago. The settings are vividly drawn--pubs which are empty in the afternoon but for the lonely seeking refuge; manor houses long since past their prime, their grounds and their inhabitants' way of life slowly drifting away; destitute farmhouses and those fighting to survive within them. My favorite story here is "Graillis' Legacy" in which a small-town librarian and widower is faced with an inheritance which has been bequeathed to him by a woman he once knew, back when his wife was still alive. The woman moved away years ago, and few people in town probably even remember her, but he wants to refuse the inheritance none the less, merely out of propriety, fearing what others might think, what they would assume to be the ill-gotten fruits of an illicit affair. He goes so far as to consult an attorney, or solicitor, to weigh his options. He was bewildered by the resurrection of a guilt that long ago had softened away to nothing. In that other time no pain had been caused, no hurt; he had managed the distortions that created falsity, the lies of silence; what he had been forgiven for was not seeming to be himself for a while. A crudity still remained in the solicitor's reading of the loose ends that were still there; the wronged wife haunting restlessly from her grave, the older woman claiming from hers the lover who had slipped away from her. Despite the writer's use of the word "lover", it's not clear if a sexual relationship ever existed between Graillis and the older woman. (Trevor leaves it left unsaid, a lovely habit of his which keeps the reader highly involved in his stories.) Instead, their relationship appeared to be platonic, with the two likely sharing no more than a love of books and conversation, indulged over coffee and cigarettes in the drawing-room of her decaying mansion. He stubbed out his second cigarette. He never smoked at home, continuing not to after he'd found himself alone there, and smoking was forbidden in the branch library, a restriction he insisted upon himself. But in the drawing-room he had sat in so often in the autumn of 1979 and the winter and spring that followed it, a friendship had developed over cigarettes, touches of lipstick on the cork tips that had accumulated in the ashtray with the goldfinch on it. That settled in his thoughts, still as a photograph, arrested with a clarity that today felt cruel. Usually when I finish a story collection and look back at the table of contents, I have to wrack my brain while looking at some of the titles, trying to think of what happened in each story. This was not the case with Trevor's book: each story immediately came to mind upon reading the corresponding title, standing out distinctly and unmistakably. A Bit on the Side is a wonderful and richly written collection of stories. I give it my highest and unreserved recommendation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Lawson

    Reading William Trevor is like coming back home to a warm fire and a pair of comfy slippers. He is a gifted story teller, especially of short stories; less is more. He crafts his characters, both phsyically and psychologically, and their emotions, using the fewest number of words possible. He moves easily from Ireland to England, but his turns of phrase and use of idioms and vernacular leave the reader in no doubt where each story is set. In stories like 'Justina's Priest' he has no need to expl Reading William Trevor is like coming back home to a warm fire and a pair of comfy slippers. He is a gifted story teller, especially of short stories; less is more. He crafts his characters, both phsyically and psychologically, and their emotions, using the fewest number of words possible. He moves easily from Ireland to England, but his turns of phrase and use of idioms and vernacular leave the reader in no doubt where each story is set. In stories like 'Justina's Priest' he has no need to explain that she is backward; he has already made that clear to the reader without needing to spell it out. You find yourself under the skins of many of the characters, sometimes they arouse sympathy, sometimes annoyance and sometimes just pity. But the effect, as with many of his other stories, both short and long, is of a modern day Chekhov. You experience an ache and a longing for what has been missed or what could have been avoided.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Moira

    Amazing collection of short stories. Trevor just gets better with age. Born in Southwest Cork, Trevor is equally at home with characters of every class and type, but he is especially good at describing the weak and powerless. His stories are heartbreaking and powerful in their deceptive simplicity. He is a master of point of view as he switches seamlessly from character to character exposing complex relationships and changes. Some of my favorite stories are in his other collections, but the titl Amazing collection of short stories. Trevor just gets better with age. Born in Southwest Cork, Trevor is equally at home with characters of every class and type, but he is especially good at describing the weak and powerless. His stories are heartbreaking and powerful in their deceptive simplicity. He is a master of point of view as he switches seamlessly from character to character exposing complex relationships and changes. Some of my favorite stories are in his other collections, but the title story and "Sitting with the Dead" are truly memorable. Also recommend "Family Sins" with the story "Kathleen's Field" and Events at Drimaghleen."

  13. 4 out of 5

    David

    I love the subtlety in Trevor's writing. These stories are delicate, forming a doorway into moments when the main characters are at their most human. This collection was recommended to me in particular for the child character portrayal in "Solitude." Trevor's technique in the child perspective is interesting. I like how when the narrator is a child all you get is matter of fact observations and recitation of judgments spouted by the adult characters, even when the main turning point of the story I love the subtlety in Trevor's writing. These stories are delicate, forming a doorway into moments when the main characters are at their most human. This collection was recommended to me in particular for the child character portrayal in "Solitude." Trevor's technique in the child perspective is interesting. I like how when the narrator is a child all you get is matter of fact observations and recitation of judgments spouted by the adult characters, even when the main turning point of the story occurs. Then, the character just shifts to being older and Trevor changes how the perspective is conveyed, giving us the narrator's own judgments. Trevor's technique works marvelously.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chaim

    Listening to the audio book proved to be a mistake. Trevor's language is elegant and listening to it was a pleasure, like slipping into a hot bath after a hard day. But given that he's such a subtle, at times elliptical, writer, I missed the turns he made in a couple stories, something which probably wouldn't have happened had the text been in front of me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A short story collection, so hard to sum up! Mostly set in Ireland in various historical periods, the stories are all well-crafted and self-contained. Most are driven entirely by character -- no plot surprises here -- and tend towards a darker view of the world.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    At its best, this collection draws a clear line from Joyce's Dubliners-- subtle character studies and achingly human moments. Even in its less perfect stories it's well-crafted, empathetic, and entertaining.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wilhelmina

    Another good effort - lots of feelings are packed into these stories that read like novels.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shonna Froebel

    Very good collection, but as usual all stories sad.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I've been going back and forth between these stories by William Trevor and a collection by Richard Bausch called Walking in the Weather of the World. They are both wonderful, and Richard Bausch's fantastic title for his collection could equally serve for Trevor's title. Both books detail the lives of people who are hurting: heartbroken, physically broken, financially undone, or spiritually barren. Yet both have moments of lust, love, hopefulness, and generosity. I guess the point is that these, I've been going back and forth between these stories by William Trevor and a collection by Richard Bausch called Walking in the Weather of the World. They are both wonderful, and Richard Bausch's fantastic title for his collection could equally serve for Trevor's title. Both books detail the lives of people who are hurting: heartbroken, physically broken, financially undone, or spiritually barren. Yet both have moments of lust, love, hopefulness, and generosity. I guess the point is that these, and the possibility of lust or love or hope or kindness make the hurt what it is. An absence. It's rare I've read two short story collections in tandem, and rarer still that I saw that they carried the same theme at their heart. William Trevor and Richard Bausch, I hope you each read each other's collections. Trevor write with thicker language. I'm not sure quite what I mean, but the Irish seem to write with more consonants. There's not quite so much air in the language. As though those rows of houses in the small towns, I think of Foxford or Sligo, has crowded the language as well as the houses. Bausch's stories often have more dramatic turns, but the careful attention to characters breathes the same kind of life into his stories. I utterly believe these people exist. Trevor's stories have the Irish awareness of death, the loss of love, the insistence of religion. In one story, the dilemma of a young girl named Justina is told almost entirely through the confessions she makes to Father Clohessy. Terrified that she will leave something out of her confession, she rattles on and on, essentially letting him in on her wondering if she should leave her nagging sister and the town. The pries talks to Justina's sister...oh the nosiness of the Irish. Father Clohessy knows that the girl is innocence itself. He tells her sister because of that innocence; he knows how vulnerable she is. So religion is more present in these stories, but the human heart, the desire to be loving to others, and the ache to take care of one's own precious heart are so often in conflict. These are stories to return to...so much about how to be human, and how to live with it when we fall short of what that means to us. Each story is like this, filled to the brim with human kindness and cruelty and interference and certainty that "someone" knows what's good for someone else. There is so much life in these stories...Just like Bausch's book. All the weather of the world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Qiong

    I've always loved the way William Trevor tells stories. Almost every sentence coming out of his pen is delicate and tender and full of confusion. Alice Munro seems to share quite a similar style of putting words together, but somehow her way of doing it just irritates me to no end. And as much as I am all for feminism, I have been disappointed for a long time with female writers writing male characters. Women are sensitive, and they are so good at capturing nuances in emotions and feelings. But i I've always loved the way William Trevor tells stories. Almost every sentence coming out of his pen is delicate and tender and full of confusion. Alice Munro seems to share quite a similar style of putting words together, but somehow her way of doing it just irritates me to no end. And as much as I am all for feminism, I have been disappointed for a long time with female writers writing male characters. Women are sensitive, and they are so good at capturing nuances in emotions and feelings. But it can get tiring once overdone. When too much sensitivity is imposed on a male character, something simply does not feel right to me. Thankfully, Trevor has done a great job at writing about women. I especially liked "An Evening Out," "Big Bucks" and "A Bit on the Side" in this collection. The three stories managed to put me in an oddly good mood, not that they are cheerful stories to speak of. The tenderness and slight sadness between lines feels like soft breeze in the early spring, which compensates for the harsh winter in Berlin big time!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    A very enjoyable set of short stories and the author's notable sympathy for his characters shines through in all their different circumstances. Some of the endings felt more definitive than others and I think I liked the ones that felt as though they left off in the middle or at a transition best. Especially enjoyed the last story about the everyday intimacy at the end of a love affair and one in the middle about a little girl with a horrible tragedy to share - without spoiling it I loved the ti A very enjoyable set of short stories and the author's notable sympathy for his characters shines through in all their different circumstances. Some of the endings felt more definitive than others and I think I liked the ones that felt as though they left off in the middle or at a transition best. Especially enjoyed the last story about the everyday intimacy at the end of a love affair and one in the middle about a little girl with a horrible tragedy to share - without spoiling it I loved the ties to her imaginary friends.

  22. 5 out of 5

    CAROL WAGERS

    Sad, lonely people leading unexceptional lives of quiet despair. Really good writing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I don't usualy read short stories, but this was an interesting collection. All set in either Ireland or England.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Caryn Picarillo

    Out of all the short stories, I found myself paying attention to, maybe, two.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A great collection from a master of the short story. 'Graillis' Legacy' and 'A Bit on the Side' are standouts. Gorgeous language, filled with (subtle) emotion. Highly recommended.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Paperback. Sitting with the dead, justina's priest, and an evening out were great.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Geo Forman

    A wonderful adventure with a new author. The title story, the last in the collection, refers to an affair finally ended by the man's guilt. This was my second favorite of the collection. After completion, I was compelled to re-read my favorite, the first story, "Sitting with the dead". This is a story of a woman married rather late in life to a man who was disapproved by her family. After twenty odd years of abusive marriage, he dies. Two well meaning elderly sisters in this small Irish village A wonderful adventure with a new author. The title story, the last in the collection, refers to an affair finally ended by the man's guilt. This was my second favorite of the collection. After completion, I was compelled to re-read my favorite, the first story, "Sitting with the dead". This is a story of a woman married rather late in life to a man who was disapproved by her family. After twenty odd years of abusive marriage, he dies. Two well meaning elderly sisters in this small Irish village come calling. The two nearly became nuns but, for reasons unexplained instead lived together as spinsters. They were self-appointed counselors of the dying. In spite of having never met the new widow or her recently departed husband, upon hearing of his terminal illness, they arrived at the front door to perform their normal duty of escorting the ill to the afterlife. Even after learning they were too late, they recognized the need for comfort in front of them. A touching and warm story of an isolated woman who, without knowing it, desperately needed someone to sit with her while she traveled to her new existence.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Great stories.

  29. 4 out of 5

    G

    These days it seems that I am drawn to Irish authors and authors from the “Southern Gothic” subgenre. I’m not sure why or what they have in common. Maybe it’s the perpetual sense that life usually has a better chance of going wrong than it does of going right. William Trevor generally fits that mold. There's a bit of bleakness that permeates his work. However for some reason this collection of short stories didn't have the same impact for me as his novels. I often ended up on page three of a stor These days it seems that I am drawn to Irish authors and authors from the “Southern Gothic” subgenre. I’m not sure why or what they have in common. Maybe it’s the perpetual sense that life usually has a better chance of going wrong than it does of going right. William Trevor generally fits that mold. There's a bit of bleakness that permeates his work. However for some reason this collection of short stories didn't have the same impact for me as his novels. I often ended up on page three of a story, then started over once I had a sense of who was who, and what was happening. Perhaps I was more distracted at the time I was consuming this. I had a hard time settling into this collection like I have with his novels. Thank goodness I won’t run out of those any time soon.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Samye88

    Overall excellent collection

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