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Dragon Prince PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Dragon Prince
Author: Melanie Rawn
Publisher: Published June 7th 2005 by DAW Trade (first published 1985)
ISBN: 9780756403010
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

185289.Dragon_Prince.pdf

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Deadly dragons hold the secret to unimaginable wealth for mutual peace, or a bloody tyrant's reign. An idealistic young ruler struggles to civilize a culture that understands the strength of the sword-but has yet to discover the true power of knowledge.

30 review for Dragon Prince

  1. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    read during my College Years I Remember: completely overlong, bloated... some surprisingly good writing at times... a trashy epic... spousal abuse... rape rape rape rape rape rape... rape for both genders!... some actual dragonslaying... a bizarre soap opera filled with machiavellian intrigue... completely unappealing protagonists... continued reading just to see how bad it would get... helped me to dismissively reject the Fantasy genre during college (glad i got over that).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zackery Arbela

    Gather round children, and cast your minds back to the ye old days of the late 80's/early 90's, when fantasy was still very much an underground thing, most stories were tedious Tolkien retreads or Dungeons and Dragons sessions put down on paper, and writers of the feminine persuasion were notably light on the ground. Which makes this book and the various series it spawn so interesting.... Nowadays, female fantasy authors are a pretty common sight, so it's a bit shocking to consider just how ahead Gather round children, and cast your minds back to the ye old days of the late 80's/early 90's, when fantasy was still very much an underground thing, most stories were tedious Tolkien retreads or Dungeons and Dragons sessions put down on paper, and writers of the feminine persuasion were notably light on the ground. Which makes this book and the various series it spawn so interesting.... Nowadays, female fantasy authors are a pretty common sight, so it's a bit shocking to consider just how ahead of its time Dragon Prince was in terms of what could be done in a traditional fantasy novel. When I first picked it up, it was amazed just how different this was from the other fare to be found in bookstores (yes, books were sold in actual stores. Ask your Dad....)What Melanie Rawn did with this story was take all the elements of an awesome epic fantasy and mix it with the conventions of a romance novel, seasoned with some of the most detailed and compelling examples of world building to be found anywhere. The result was something groundbreaking. While there are battles galore and fantastical deed by the score, the core of this tale is the relationship between Rohan and Sioned, the passion that draws them together, the dangers and obstacles that block them. No final voyages to Valhalla here along the lines of a traditional romance, Lancelot and Guinevere, Romeo and Juliet, or any number of bodice rippers sold by the dozen made magnificent by the inclusion of dragons. Today it's a common enough formula, which makes this book something of a groundbreaker. It showed (to angsty Gen-X teenagers at least) that fantasy could be more than just the slay the dragon while standing on a mountain of skulls. That there was room for real emotion and passion. In short, a good read. Not to mention the cover art by Michael Whelan, reason enough to buy the printed version. Posted by Zackery Arbela

  3. 5 out of 5

    Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller

    I read this book sooooo long ago, I could probably only tell you a couple of things about it. The problem is, even a few weeks after reading it, I doubt I could have come up with much more. It was one of those books where the concept was interesting as all get-out, but I found myself struggling with the execution. At the time I thought it was a lack of concentration, but now that I'm a little more well-read in the genre, I think it was just a little dry. Not quite boring, but on the cusp if you I read this book sooooo long ago, I could probably only tell you a couple of things about it. The problem is, even a few weeks after reading it, I doubt I could have come up with much more. It was one of those books where the concept was interesting as all get-out, but I found myself struggling with the execution. At the time I thought it was a lack of concentration, but now that I'm a little more well-read in the genre, I think it was just a little dry. Not quite boring, but on the cusp if you weren't fascinated with the dragons and the magic. I finished this trilogy and the one after - my feelings very similar for all of them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Back in the 90s, I was helping by volunteering to set up a book sale at the local library with my mom. We also got first pick of the books there. I saw these books and they had nice covers, and an intriguing back. I asked my mom if I could buy them (being young myself). Ironically, it was from the box(es) of books we'd donated! And so, we bought back our own books, so that I could read them. (My mom swore she'd never donate books without running them by me first again.. not sure if she's held to Back in the 90s, I was helping by volunteering to set up a book sale at the local library with my mom. We also got first pick of the books there. I saw these books and they had nice covers, and an intriguing back. I asked my mom if I could buy them (being young myself). Ironically, it was from the box(es) of books we'd donated! And so, we bought back our own books, so that I could read them. (My mom swore she'd never donate books without running them by me first again.. not sure if she's held to that. But anyways.) If only I'd listened to my mother (she'd advised against reading it). I suppose the clue should have been that she'd donated it, when usually we kept them (and owned 500+ books). But lo, I read them. As much as I could stomach, anyways. Melanie Rawn has to be one of the trashiest, most vile book writers I've ever had the misfortune to read. I am not talking about her writing style, or even her wordplay. I'm talking about her ideas, and her views and portrayals of humanity - even her so-called "brightest" are people I'd never want to meet. If I could scrub her books from my mind I would. Pol, I'd thrash you and maybe worse if I ever met you. Among other people. In her defense, some of the worst scenes are so artfully awful that they are imprinted on my memory - not many authors can do that. And to have me hating her over a decade later, speaks volumes of how solid, how real, the scenes she evokes are. And if I had stopped after reading the first half of the book (It's split into 2 stories), I could have thought much much more highly of her. Suffice to say, unless you like rather despicable people, acts, and such, don't read this book. Or the series. If you do, go right ahead.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicola O.

    One of my favorite series. Owes quite a bit to Dune, I think, but creative enough on its own merits. In series like this, you often get either great characters or great plotting, but this has both. Heroes with dark sides, villains with layers, love and family and politics and magic twine together to keep your interest through several generations.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wyrdness

    I feel rather betrayed by one of my favourite authors (Grace Draven) giving this 5 stars. I can understand why she likes it so much, it is well written and manages to weave several character threads in to an involved story without giving too much focus to any one in particular. Yet I found myself disliking most of the characters by the end of the novel and for me personally that always leads to a bad rating. Add that to the problems I had with the events near the end of the book and, well, it wa I feel rather betrayed by one of my favourite authors (Grace Draven) giving this 5 stars. I can understand why she likes it so much, it is well written and manages to weave several character threads in to an involved story without giving too much focus to any one in particular. Yet I found myself disliking most of the characters by the end of the novel and for me personally that always leads to a bad rating. Add that to the problems I had with the events near the end of the book and, well, it was not going to end well... For me this book was going quite well up until somewhere around the 70% mark, then it fell over a cliff and never managed to redeem itself in my eyes. Up until that point I'd been enjoying the (not so subtle) intrigues and how the characters felt like they truly influenced events around them, but I'm sorry, the entire concept of one of the protagonists I'm supposed to be sympathetic to hate-raping the daughter of his enemy is a massive big read X for me. Nope, just no, I am done. (view spoiler)[This goes double when the hate-rape involves the character also cheating on a wife they're supposed to be deeply in love with and utterly devoted to all so they can father an "heir of the body". Especially when the same character not long previously rejected taking a mistress solely to have an heir because they said it wasn't a big deal and was utterly repulsed at the thought of having sex with anyone but said wife, and has up to this point been an honourable and idealistic individual. The fact that the wife was so remarkably calm about her husbands actions and even planned the murder of the (admittedly pretty horrible) mother and to raise his bastard son as her own was another WTF-I-am-done moment. I forgot to mention this is after her husband tried to rape her in an "I have no idea what's going on anymore" scene. All this hypocrisy and descent in to barbarism seems to be because they assume the wife is barren, yet they're both under 30 (in a world where people are still sprightly enough to kill dragons at 60), have only been married 6 years, and I would say 3 miscarriages (with one of those being from surviving a lethal plague) and her not being pregnant under severely stressful circumstances (in a harsh and unforgiving desert environment) is not really concrete proof of anything. (hide spoiler)] The amount of character twisting involved in these events completely robbed me of any enjoyment I was having, which is really a shame because I otherwise very much liked the world this was set in. If you are unbothered by rape-y bits and can overlook the hypocrisy of the main characters becoming just like the evil, abusive enemy they fight so hard against (which could have been cool if it showed any signs of being intentionally done), then perhaps you will enjoy this more than I did.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ban

    I'm giving this book a 5 star rating but you must understand I read this book a long time ago and in my mind it has always been 'The Book'. Melanie's world was so rich, alive and beautiful - even her 'bad guys'. I realize that is a tad idealistic but I loved it. I loved the way she described her characters, as if each of them was dear to her. Everything in that book felt loved. It is the book that first first made me want to create worlds and characters of my own. I'd read fantasy and sci-fi boo I'm giving this book a 5 star rating but you must understand I read this book a long time ago and in my mind it has always been 'The Book'. Melanie's world was so rich, alive and beautiful - even her 'bad guys'. I realize that is a tad idealistic but I loved it. I loved the way she described her characters, as if each of them was dear to her. Everything in that book felt loved. It is the book that first first made me want to create worlds and characters of my own. I'd read fantasy and sci-fi books before but none touched me the way this one did. It was also my first glimpse into the combining of romance between the MCs in fantasy. I was hooked - I went out, got all the books in the series (both of them) and read them all back to back. PS: I also confess I'm a cover tramp and the main reason I picked this book up is my love of Michael Whelan's artwork. Sue me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Yates

    The Dragon Prince is the story about a young prince who is unexpectedly thrown into the seat of power at a very young age. Throughout the story, Rohan struggles with balancing his ideals for peacefully ruling his desert kingdom and the unavoidable need to wage war against those who would threaten that peace. As much as it is about Rohan, it is equally about his wife, Sioned. She is a magic user, called a SunRunner, who's considerable powers are forbidden to be used to kill. However, as a princes The Dragon Prince is the story about a young prince who is unexpectedly thrown into the seat of power at a very young age. Throughout the story, Rohan struggles with balancing his ideals for peacefully ruling his desert kingdom and the unavoidable need to wage war against those who would threaten that peace. As much as it is about Rohan, it is equally about his wife, Sioned. She is a magic user, called a SunRunner, who's considerable powers are forbidden to be used to kill. However, as a princess, she must struggle with her own inner demons and the demands to use her powers against her oaths in order to aide and protect her husband. I found this to be an interesting novel written in a style that I'm not entirely used to reading. There is a healthy dose of action and war that I expect in a fantasy novel along with some political intrigue involving the new prince coming to power and working to institute his own ideals. Along with this, there is a lot of emphasis placed upon the developing relationship between Rohan and Sioned. This adds a nice depth to the novel, although at times it gets dangerously close to treading into romance novel territory!! Wink I think that this is one of the rare fantasy novels that will appeal to male and female readers almost equally.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Dragon Prince is quite different from most of my favorite series, but it's stuck with me for over 20 years as a cut above most things that I've read. It is far less action-focused than lots of fantasy, instead focusing more on politics, relationships, the nature of leadership, power, and the value of questioning norms. Unlike most 'political' fantasy this one still has quite a bit of excitement and action as well. Unlike many 'relationship' focused stories this one highlights the fact that all of Dragon Prince is quite different from most of my favorite series, but it's stuck with me for over 20 years as a cut above most things that I've read. It is far less action-focused than lots of fantasy, instead focusing more on politics, relationships, the nature of leadership, power, and the value of questioning norms. Unlike most 'political' fantasy this one still has quite a bit of excitement and action as well. Unlike many 'relationship' focused stories this one highlights the fact that all of them carry imperfections and clashes. The series as a whole also taught me at a young age that there are many different forms of love, family, and friendship. Despite all this it is never really preachy and never really boring. It was one of the first 'rules based' magic systems I ever encountered, having numerous restrictions but still carrying with it a sense of amazement. It also flirted with grim dark well before that was a thing and is not afraid to kill off numerous ancillary and even main characters as the series continues.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aldi

    I honestly thought that, rereading this for the first time in about 15 years, I'd have more trouble with some of the cheesier bits, but honestly? I still adore it. Cheese included. I love this world. I love how coming back to it always feels like coming home, and how encountering these characters is always like reconnecting with old friends. I love the richness of the magic. I love the dragons. My perspective on some of the characters has shifted somewhat (for example, I'm much quicker now to ca I honestly thought that, rereading this for the first time in about 15 years, I'd have more trouble with some of the cheesier bits, but honestly? I still adore it. Cheese included. I love this world. I love how coming back to it always feels like coming home, and how encountering these characters is always like reconnecting with old friends. I love the richness of the magic. I love the dragons. My perspective on some of the characters has shifted somewhat (for example, I'm much quicker now to call Rohan and Sioned out on some of their more hypocritical moves, and I have a LOT more sympathy for Roelstra's daughters, up to and specifically including Ianthe), but I love that, too - being able to get exasperated and/or sympathising with their flaws, in some new ways now that I didn't relate to before. Can't wait to dive into Star Scroll!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Actual rating: 3.5 to 4 stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Good set piece start, drifts away to rubbish. Has a positive review from Anne McCaffrey, the patron saint of lackluster writing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ishpeck

    Melanie Rawn writes total garbage. One or two good ideas littered with shallow characters, nonsensical plots, and anticlimactic endings. This book almost makes me wish I was illiterate.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    The story is very political, which is fine and normal in fantasy literature. It was the characters who disappointed me. Rohan's first few chapters introduced him as smart, capable and calculated. He wanted more for his kingdom than constant war, and seemed set to be a great literary hero. Unfortunately, his love for Sioned was not so beautiful. Like most of her male characters, Rohan's carnal urges overwhelmed his reason throughout the entire novel. His lust, or "Fire," for Sioned (and hers for The story is very political, which is fine and normal in fantasy literature. It was the characters who disappointed me. Rohan's first few chapters introduced him as smart, capable and calculated. He wanted more for his kingdom than constant war, and seemed set to be a great literary hero. Unfortunately, his love for Sioned was not so beautiful. Like most of her male characters, Rohan's carnal urges overwhelmed his reason throughout the entire novel. His lust, or "Fire," for Sioned (and hers for him) seemed to be the driving factor in their relationship. Only a few times in the book did the characters think fond thoughts of each other that had nothing to do with their sexual relationship. That's fine and good for a married couple, but their relationship should have been based on more than sex. At the end of the book, I still don't really feel I know the characters and more worrisome, I don't like what I do know. Rohan is eventually kidnapped by Ianthe, Roelstra's oldest daughter. Roelstra, despite his mistresses, has not been able to get a son, and Ianthe wants to conceive one with Rohan. Before he marries Sioned, she sneaks into his tent and he realizes while groping her that she's not Sioned and kicks her out. This time, Ianthe drugs him and convinces him that Sioned has come to rescue him, and succeeds in doing the deed with him, hoping that he has gotten her pregnant. Then Rohan wakes up, is furious and starts beating her, and then rapes Ianthe. Meanwhile, Sioned has gone to rescue him, been put in the dungeon by Ianthe, and been raped by her men. Rohan and Sioned are allowed to leave because hey, Ianthe got what she wanted, and they hide in a cave when their horses get away. Sioned spurns Rohan's advances so he gets mad at her, and then all of a sudden, a few chapters later they're fine and lusting after each other like always. Ianthe gives birth to Rohan's son and Sioned steals him, killing Ianthe, intending to raise the boy as their own. Nevermind everyone in the kingdom could see she wasn't pregnant and is probably wondering where the kid came from. Dragon Prince is nearly 600 pages long, and during the last 100 pages, Rawn kept interrupting the action with long chapters full of strategy and soliloquy by secondary characters. That was fine during the first half, but not during the height of the action. I actually skipped around until I found the parts where the action continued and ignored the political ramblings in between. I still understand what happened at the end of the book, so it obviously wasn't that important. All in all, this book was okay. The action, basic structure of the plot, and the world-building were great, but the characterization sucked big time. There are more books in the series, and I won't be reading them. Too bad I bought this at Barnes & Noble instead of getting it from the library.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dorian

    I'm not sure how I didn't read this back in the late 80s or early 90s, when it was new and I was reading fairly indiscriminately through the fantasy genre, or as much of it as I could get my hands on. But somehow I didn't. It bears its age pretty well, I think (unlike, say, Jennifer Roberson's Sword-Dancer, which I found almost unreadable on returning to it recently). Some aspects, mainly the depiction of the romance between the two protagonists, do feel very dated, but most of it still felt very I'm not sure how I didn't read this back in the late 80s or early 90s, when it was new and I was reading fairly indiscriminately through the fantasy genre, or as much of it as I could get my hands on. But somehow I didn't. It bears its age pretty well, I think (unlike, say, Jennifer Roberson's Sword-Dancer, which I found almost unreadable on returning to it recently). Some aspects, mainly the depiction of the romance between the two protagonists, do feel very dated, but most of it still felt very fresh. It's basically a coming-of-age story - the coming of age of Rohan, who inherits the Princedom of the Desert at the start of the book; of Sioned, a Sunrunner and Rohan's destined wife; of their world, a conglomerate of Princedoms still mostly ruled by the sword rather than the law, something they aim to change. There's a plethora of interesting and complicated characters, on both the protagonists' and the antagonist's sides. And if the antagonist's motivations are a bit simplistic (power, power and more power), at least both he and those around him are real characters and not just ciphers. It's also pleasing to note that at least as many of the viewpoint characters (of which there are many) are female as male. (And how depressing that 26 years after this book was first published, I still feel the need to note that.) I liked the magic too; the Sunrunners seem to be some kind of religious-based mages - at least they train at the Goddess Keep, though we don't learn anything much about said Goddess. Anyway, they can travel mentally on light to see things far away, or to communicate mentally with each other. And they get really, really sick on water, which makes crossing rivers interesting. And you can prevent them from using their powers by locking them up in the dark. The story does sag a bit in the middle, I thought, and doesn't really pick up again until about the last quarter, but it didn't quite lose my interest. Overall it's a fairly light read, despite some fairly gruesome bits; it doesn't have the gritty feel of some more recent fantasy, which I liked.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ken Badertscher

    Romantasy or Fantamance? Dragon Prince, Melanie Rawn’s first novel, was ahead of the fantasy/romance genre curve in 1988. Rawn decorates an epic fantasy core story with romantic trappings, and it works, most of the time. The early medieval fantasy world of Dragon Prince comes to life in vibrant Sunrunner magical colors. The environments, especially the desert, are depicted in fine detail, capturing the reader with sensuous descriptions. The book has a few minor issues: recurring emotional imagery Romantasy or Fantamance? Dragon Prince, Melanie Rawn’s first novel, was ahead of the fantasy/romance genre curve in 1988. Rawn decorates an epic fantasy core story with romantic trappings, and it works, most of the time. The early medieval fantasy world of Dragon Prince comes to life in vibrant Sunrunner magical colors. The environments, especially the desert, are depicted in fine detail, capturing the reader with sensuous descriptions. The book has a few minor issues: recurring emotional imagery and a lack of depth to many of the secondary characters. The main characters are vividly drawn, but the spotlight on them is a bit tight. Everyone seems a little dim compared to Rohan and Sioned, and I suppose that is the novel’s romance side coming to the fore. The reader may get too much inside the head of the characters at some points. A lot of the narrative is filled with the internal monologue and deeply felt emotions of the characters. This tends to give the plot a stuttery feel as conflicts arise, characters ponder, then swoon or glower at each other, then ponder some more, then something else happens. The story is interesting, but not very complex. There is mostly one main thread of plot throughout, though there are many brief branches and callbacks. I think the story could have used a bit of pruning, especially since the general focus is so strong on the main characters. Any time a secondary character comes to the fore, it’s not very rewarding, as they tend to be more sketchy and predictable. The frequent callbacks and rehashing of characters’ feelings can be distracting, too. Although worded differently and often approached from different angles, some themes are visited repeatedly. Despite these issues, the plotting of the princes and the romance of the main characters is engaging enough to keep the pages turning. Dragon Prince is not for everyone, as it has far more romance and politics than action and adventure. Though few, the action sequences are lively and stimulating. I’m looking forward to checking out some of Melanie Rawn’s other books set in the Dragon Prince world, as I have a feeling that the later novels may be even better.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amanda R

    When I was 15 and going through a very hard time, a girl I worked with handed me three tattered paperback books and told me that they would help me to feel better. She then cautioned me that I couldn't keep them, though - they'd been handed down four times by that point, and the condition was that I had to read them, love them, and then pass them on. That was 17 years ago, and those books are still sitting on my shelf. Oops. My one defense is that I got the author to sign them (four years after When I was 15 and going through a very hard time, a girl I worked with handed me three tattered paperback books and told me that they would help me to feel better. She then cautioned me that I couldn't keep them, though - they'd been handed down four times by that point, and the condition was that I had to read them, love them, and then pass them on. That was 17 years ago, and those books are still sitting on my shelf. Oops. My one defense is that I got the author to sign them (four years after they were originally given to me) and couldn't bear to part with them after that. I have since bought replacement copies, since those were so beat up, and now I just need to cut the autographs out and paste them into the new ones. After I've done that, I'll pass the books along, I swear. And if that isn't a ringing endorsement of the quality of Dragon Prince, I don't know what is. I have loved these stories and characters for more than half my life now. If I read DP now for the first time, I think I would have more nitpicks - after all, Sioned does have definite Mary Sue tendencies, the pacing is a little strange at times, and there are several inconsistencies - but that doesn't really matter now. What matters is that it's a fascinating and compelling story, filled with likable and interesting and very, very real people, and that it provided me with a truly excellent wormhole to disappear into whenever I needed to. I will love these books forever. Update 11/13/16: Yep, still love it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Melanie Rawn writes epic fantasy that keeps me invested in the story. Her characters are not perfect people, even if they are idealistic--reality won't allow for idealism and they are forced to make decisions and break their own codes of honor time and again. I enjoyed all of the political maneuvering in this book. That's 90% of the book. Because the entire thing is about power--not wanting it, wanting it, wanting more of it, how it can be a burden, wanting to secure it. But it's also about love Melanie Rawn writes epic fantasy that keeps me invested in the story. Her characters are not perfect people, even if they are idealistic--reality won't allow for idealism and they are forced to make decisions and break their own codes of honor time and again. I enjoyed all of the political maneuvering in this book. That's 90% of the book. Because the entire thing is about power--not wanting it, wanting it, wanting more of it, how it can be a burden, wanting to secure it. But it's also about love, and how that has power too. Great book, interesting characters, and I am reminded on this re-read why I loved it so much when I first read it more than 20 years ago.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    2.5 stars. It has been a long time since I read this and I have it on my list to re-read so my review may change at some point. My recollection is that this book was VERY SLOW and wasn't interesting enough to make me want to read the next book in the series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Melanie Rawn's fantasy world full of Sunrunners, Princes and Dragons is one of the most beautiful creations I've read about. The Sunrunners are people who can send their thoughts out over sunlight to communicate or view things over long distances. They learn, inadvertently, that dragons possess this same power. Meanwhile, warring Princes and overly ambitious religious leaders make this story feel more like a political intrigue than a fantasy novel. And just a friendly warning: Rawn isn't afraid Melanie Rawn's fantasy world full of Sunrunners, Princes and Dragons is one of the most beautiful creations I've read about. The Sunrunners are people who can send their thoughts out over sunlight to communicate or view things over long distances. They learn, inadvertently, that dragons possess this same power. Meanwhile, warring Princes and overly ambitious religious leaders make this story feel more like a political intrigue than a fantasy novel. And just a friendly warning: Rawn isn't afraid to kill off a character.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Another series of books I wanted to like, I was looking for something to read.... It didn't matter, and it didn't work. The books just didn't interest me they couldn't pull my interest in, much less hold it. I know a lot like these, I see the good ratings, but they're just not something I wanted to read, didn't finish the first.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jinxsa

    This book is huge! What I thought was the first SERIES was the first book.The is a great sweeping book that is inspired in it's scheming and politicing. I'm re-reading both series (6 books total). I can't remember which book had what in it so I'll go through it again and rate aptly. It's taking me ages as DBF is visiting and I'm not getting much kindle time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tess

    This is a fantastic fantasy series and I am surprised I hadn't found it sooner! The characters and plots are a blend between David Eddings and Anne McCaffrey, but still very unique in many ways. This takes place in a world where there is no "magic" persay, but there are Sunrunners that can use sunlight and moonlight to view far away places, speak telepathically to eachother, and even create fire and illusions. They are used as messengers, advisors, and spiritual leaders and are held in high regar This is a fantastic fantasy series and I am surprised I hadn't found it sooner! The characters and plots are a blend between David Eddings and Anne McCaffrey, but still very unique in many ways. This takes place in a world where there is no "magic" persay, but there are Sunrunners that can use sunlight and moonlight to view far away places, speak telepathically to eachother, and even create fire and illusions. They are used as messengers, advisors, and spiritual leaders and are held in high regard. There are also the Princes, who rule with the power of land and people, and are advised by the sunrunners. And there are dragons. At the time of this book, there is a High Prince who is only concerned with his own ambitions, and a prince-heir Rohan whose Prince father is known for his bravery in battles, and for uniting his subjects. When Rohan becomes Prince in his father's stead, he vows to oust the evil High Prince and rule fairly, lawfully, and justly. Then there is a very talented and skilled Sunrunner, Sioned. She has seen Rohan in a firey vision as her husband and they will be rulers together. This was a great first book, and the first trilogy (Dragon Prince, Star Scroll, and Sunrunner's Fire) are wonderful reads. The second trilogy, Dragon Token, takes place shortly after Sunrunner's Fire. They continue the story when the continent is under attack from foreign invaders. I loved the idea of using sunlight to carry messages, and that the sunrunners are peaceful and exalted people. The laws that Rohan strives to make create interesting politics that are easy to follow. The few down sides I have found is that there are so many names. In several of the books Ms. Rawn has a character glossery in the back, which helps. I was also a little disappointed by the time jumps - sometimes decades go by, and other times many chapters cover just a few days. Her dating system was confusing to me too, until I realized that some chapters took place earlier in time but later in the book to tell what was happening at the same time, different places. Over all the first 2 books were my favorite, and I started disliking some of the main characters in the later 4 books. I still recommend it highly however, and am eager to read other series by Melanie Rawn!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Coila

    For me, this was an ok read...I finished it, but I probably would not read it again and it isn't staying on my shelf (its heading to the used book store next trip that direction.) At the time it was written, I'm sure it was innovative to have a strong female character as one of the main characters in the book and the departure from "dudes on a quest" style fantasy was a big deal...but in the intervening decades, there are series that are wayyyy more impressive in terms of characterization and plo For me, this was an ok read...I finished it, but I probably would not read it again and it isn't staying on my shelf (its heading to the used book store next trip that direction.) At the time it was written, I'm sure it was innovative to have a strong female character as one of the main characters in the book and the departure from "dudes on a quest" style fantasy was a big deal...but in the intervening decades, there are series that are wayyyy more impressive in terms of characterization and plot and general complexity- so this feels kind of boring in many ways. The things that are supposed to be shocking and thought-provoking are mostly just distasteful or ho-hum. Random plot twists that go nowhere (lets kill off half the people in the world with a plague! Now let's forget about the plague and go see who is having babies on the other side of the world...) made me feel like I'd missed some chapters somewhere. The characters are fairly one-dimensional, and they didn't really make me want to follow them through their world. I ended up setting this book aside often while other things caught my interest...then I'd go back to it later because I felt guilty I had not finished it yet and it was sitting there half-read on my side table. So it obviously was unable to really command my attention and interest. If someone happened to have this book on their shelf and loves fantasy, I'd say sure, read it and see if you like it. (Some people absolutely adore this book, for whatever reason...) I wouldn't recommend someone go out and seek it out though.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Skyler

    Melanie Rawn paints a very compelling female-positive swords and sorcery story that is vastly superior to it's "damsel-in-distress" counterparts. Introduced to this book in my youth (simply because it has dragons, and I have a fetish), I had forgotten how politically driven the story is. Opening with action that leads to a young and un-blooded heir assuming reign over a large kingdom with a valuable secret only he knows, the intrigue is strong from the start. Add to it the idea of an arranged mar Melanie Rawn paints a very compelling female-positive swords and sorcery story that is vastly superior to it's "damsel-in-distress" counterparts. Introduced to this book in my youth (simply because it has dragons, and I have a fetish), I had forgotten how politically driven the story is. Opening with action that leads to a young and un-blooded heir assuming reign over a large kingdom with a valuable secret only he knows, the intrigue is strong from the start. Add to it the idea of an arranged marriage to an accomplished wielder of magic that he falls desperately in love with, but cannot reveal until after he has abused his search for his bride to win an advantage over a cruel rival, and you have the makings of an incredible political story. But rather than the typical power-struggle stories of traditional fantasy--dry and emotionless, or lustful and indulgent--Rawn captures the spirit of a woman's point of view and imbues the writing with passion and soul. Her world has incredibly strong female characters, along with men who are uncomfortable with the idea, and they are all believable as they succumb to their own strengths and weaknesses. Very compelling read, accented by a well-crafted world of magic, knights in shining armor, and princesses who demand respect from the reader time and again. Occasionally reads like a romance novel, but it was not often, and I enjoyed how they set the mood.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    REREAD: 25 July 2014 - 17 November 2014 (8/10) Rereading with Judith Tarr's Tor.com read along. I really enjoyed this. The faults in the book that Judith brought up, I knew were there but had chosen to ignore. This reread was a chance to again acknowledge them (and the changes in the genre in almost 30 years) and yet still enjoy the book. I just plain like this series. Last time I reread the book I had plans to go on to The Star Scroll and never quite got around it it, so I'm happy that reading on REREAD: 25 July 2014 - 17 November 2014 (8/10) Rereading with Judith Tarr's Tor.com read along. I really enjoyed this. The faults in the book that Judith brought up, I knew were there but had chosen to ignore. This reread was a chance to again acknowledge them (and the changes in the genre in almost 30 years) and yet still enjoy the book. I just plain like this series. Last time I reread the book I had plans to go on to The Star Scroll and never quite got around it it, so I'm happy that reading on with Judith will keep me going this time. REREAD: 15 June 2010 - 23 July 2010 (9/10) It's gone slowly, but I really enjoyed rereading Melanie Rawn's Dragon Prince. I loved meeting the characters all over again and watching them find their feet and change their world. In many ways, it's a relatively simple story (certainly not as complicated as the later volumes in the series or Rawn's truly complicated - but excellent - Exiles series), but a most enjoyable one. It shows it's age a little bit, mostly in that some of the themes probably wouldn't be treated the same way today (mostly Rohan's pain in trying to be "civilised" and finding himself a "barbarian" underneath). But all in all, it was still a very enjoyable read and I hope to find the time to go back to the rest of the series before too long.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Omly

    This was a re-read, although since I hadn't read it in many years I had forgotten most of the nuances of plot. Due to violence, addiction, sexual situations and rape, I would recommend this to more adult readers. This story is set in a world of princes ruled by a High Prince. It is filled with politics among princes, among mistresses, among Sunrunners (those with the ability to send their thoughts and observations anywhere the sunlight goes) and even about the hunting of dragons. Sometimes the qu This was a re-read, although since I hadn't read it in many years I had forgotten most of the nuances of plot. Due to violence, addiction, sexual situations and rape, I would recommend this to more adult readers. This story is set in a world of princes ruled by a High Prince. It is filled with politics among princes, among mistresses, among Sunrunners (those with the ability to send their thoughts and observations anywhere the sunlight goes) and even about the hunting of dragons. Sometimes the question is how far you will go to get what you want, what you are willing to give up to get there, and how clever your enemies are.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    What an awful book. The writing is competent, which is what kept me involved for so long. But after the time jump (post-plague), I could see that we weren't going to be making much progress, plot and character wise. What miserable people.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Noura Noman

    Bought at 99p at a bookstore in London, I could not believe what a GREAT fantasy it turned out to be. Melanie Rawn is a wonderful creator of worlds and characters.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    I liked this book better when I was younger. It lacks depth the depth that I remembered. And I know the ebook is missing parts. I read the paperback often enough to know which parts. Pretty disappointing. I’m rating it 3 stars for sentimental reasons.

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