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Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 1: Faces of Death PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 1: Faces of Death
Author: Tony S. Daniel
Publisher: Published June 6th 2012 by DC Comics
ISBN: 9781401234669
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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As a part of the acclaimed DC Comics—The New 52 event of September 2011, Detective Comics is relaunched for the first time ever with an all-new number #1! Bruce Wayne returns as Batman, and sets his sights on new villain the Gotham Ripper, who in turn has his sights on Batman. Meanwhile, Bruce Wayne explores a budding romance with television journalist Charlotte Rivers, wh As a part of the acclaimed DC Comics—The New 52 event of September 2011, Detective Comics is relaunched for the first time ever with an all-new number #1! Bruce Wayne returns as Batman, and sets his sights on new villain the Gotham Ripper, who in turn has his sights on Batman. Meanwhile, Bruce Wayne explores a budding romance with television journalist Charlotte Rivers, who's visiting Gotham City to cover the gruesome slayings–while also trying to uncover Bruce's own mystery. But time is running out as both Commissioner Gordon and Batman work to uncover the true identity of this new serial killer. Collecting DETECTIVE COMICS #1-7

30 review for Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 1: Faces of Death

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B-) 69% | Satisfactory Notes: Told in such shallow, bedraggled, ramshackle shorthand that all its shock and bluster brews is apathetic disaffection.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    The Joker has green hair. Check out the cover. Yeah, I know I’m really stretching the “green” theme, so shaddup! Two and a half stars. Batman has arguably the best rogue’s gallery of villains in comics and the books have been published since 1939 so the Bat creators have had years to come up with a few compelling characters. This makes the task, for current creators, of bringing something new to the table rather daunting. Take The New 52 (please!?!), the Court of Owls storyline in anyone else but The Joker has green hair. Check out the cover. Yeah, I know I’m really stretching the “green” theme, so shaddup! Two and a half stars. Batman has arguably the best rogue’s gallery of villains in comics and the books have been published since 1939 so the Bat creators have had years to come up with a few compelling characters. This makes the task, for current creators, of bringing something new to the table rather daunting. Take The New 52 (please!?!), the Court of Owls storyline in anyone else but Scott Snyder’s capable hands would have been a disaster. Huge, unwieldy and a plot line that ran across a gazillion other books. A gazillion, I counted. The new (?) villain in this volume is the Dollmaker. His shtick: using a scalpel to remove skin, organs and various appendages from Joe Gotham, which he uses to “enhance” his crew. He also wears the facial skin of his father, who’s probably dead. The Dollmaker uses his particular talents to remove The Joker’s face – a plot point that sadly develops elsewhere. The GCPD has the face locked away where no one will ever be able to get their hands on it. Sure, they won’t. More baffling storylines include: a few pages of Catwoman flaying some ne’er-do-wells and a cryptic remark from Batman to Alfred about corpses on the subway that had their blood drained vampire-style and when-the-hell-are-you-going-to-analyze-it-Pennyworth? In addition to the nasty Dollmaker, we get a Penguin story. About a casino opening. It seems that the Penguin has taken some money from a bunch of grade D DC villain mooks and stored it in is impenetrable safe, where nobody will be able to get to it. Sure, they won’t. About the mooks: You have Gas Man – his head is red gas enclosed in glass. The Turban – he wears a turban. And my favorite, Hypnotic (I think that’s what his name was). He wears a pair of those swirly specs that they used to advertise in the back of comics. The kind that allows you the power of x-ray vision to see through walls, skin and women’s blouses. This guy has the power to hypnotize. “Hey Batman, look at me so I can hypnotize you and then you can do my bidding. BWHAHAHAHA! Batman punches him in the face and breaks his glasses. Sigh.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I liked this title much better than Batman, Vol. 1: The Court of Owls, but apparently I am one of the few who felt that way. I'm not sure why, though. The art was great and the story flowed really well. The only thing that was slightly annoying was that this new villain, Dollmaker, seemed a little too much like Professor Pyg (my opinion). sigh I'm sure I'm gonna catch hell from all of you who are in love with Snyder's Batman. Sorry. I like Daniel's stuff better. Neener, neener....

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    I never tend to read comics in the order they are published. So sometimes there are entire story arcs that have happened that I am unaware of. At some point Joker decided the cut off his face or someone cut it off of him. Either way it was a big WTF moment. I am happy to say my confusion has passed-I came across the Joker Face volume! Of course that is not what it is called. It's called "Faces of Death" (similar to a dark video of the same name showing various bloody deaths). But for me it was th I never tend to read comics in the order they are published. So sometimes there are entire story arcs that have happened that I am unaware of. At some point Joker decided the cut off his face or someone cut it off of him. Either way it was a big WTF moment. I am happy to say my confusion has passed-I came across the Joker Face volume! Of course that is not what it is called. It's called "Faces of Death" (similar to a dark video of the same name showing various bloody deaths). But for me it was the answer I had been seeking-WTF happened to the Joker? The Joker, captured after a run in with Bats, gets in touch with Dollmaker and decides to make a change-but having Dollmaker cut off his face. Now everybody thinks Batman killed the Joker. So while Batman avoids the cops and fights the Dollmaker's minions, all the while searching for the faceless Joker. Not to mention the Penguin gets in on the act. The artwork is good all throughout this story. But, more than anything, it was a good batman story. No endless parade of C & D list wanna-be heroes, no Batman-mart or Batman Inc..whatever that idiocy was called...no this is batman doing what Batman does best- fight criminals, do great detective work and attempt to rescue Gordon and a little girl from the Dollmaker's clutches. All in all-this is what batman is about. Also now I know how Joker lost his face.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on our blog by clicking here. The New 52 event hit DC Comics like a whirlwind and brought us brand new series and brand new creative teams working on our favorite superheroes like never before. As some series stand out compared to others, comic fans still find themselves in front of dozens of new worlds to jump into and new ways to entertain themselves with never before seen characters, artwork and stories. If anything, this major comic book event helps new readers plunge i You can find my review on our blog by clicking here. The New 52 event hit DC Comics like a whirlwind and brought us brand new series and brand new creative teams working on our favorite superheroes like never before. As some series stand out compared to others, comic fans still find themselves in front of dozens of new worlds to jump into and new ways to entertain themselves with never before seen characters, artwork and stories. If anything, this major comic book event helps new readers plunge into the DC universe with more ease. Who doesn't like order and cleanliness anyways? Among the new series out there, Batman fans get to celebrate (or not) with a reboot of Batman : Detective Comics. Kicking it off with a #1 issue, the first volume titled Batman : Detective Comics (Volume 1) - Faces of Death is written and penciled by the famous Tony S. Daniel with the help of Sandu Florea (inker), Ryan Winn (inker) and Szymon Kudranski (artist). Although the Detective Comics have been one of the longest running and highly praised series pre-52, the New 52 series sadly doesn't match up with its companion series Batman by Scott Snyder and Gregg Capullo. What can you do when you go up against a God like Scott Snyder, right? You just can’t beat him. That however doesn't mean that you should turn a blind eye on this series. Volume 1 contains issues #1 to #7 and starts off with the Dark Knight chasing down the Gotham Ripper, a gruesome murderer that has been committing horrible crimes throughout Gotham. Trying to figure out the identity of this mysterious figure, Batman and Commissioner Gordon find themselves up against villains that never seize to drag chaos around them. As his investigation has him stumbling around Gotham, Bruce Wayne's relationship with a journalist adds additional weight on his shoulders and has him in compromising situations that might later trouble the Caped Crusader. Even with the crazy linear adventure that leads Batman to go from one villain to another, this was still a fun run. The first couple of issues were really decent. The story line evolved naturally and kept the intrigue going. The writing was fine and having the Dark Knight’s narration throughout the story wasn’t so bad. It was quite reinvigorating to see what went through his mind throughout the fights, but I definitely would’ve preferred having more dialogue outside of his mind. It’s only halfway into the volume, when a certain buyer comes into play and dramatically changes the whim of a villain by the presentation of a grand sum that things started to go all over the place. A nasty mess, I tell ya. Once that story line was introduced, it was as if we were introduced to a slippery slope and we just couldn’t stop ourselves from skidding down to disappointment… At this point, the story completely turns away from the intrigue it built and hovers over to an adventure that’s just utterly random. Brand new characters are introduced and whole new objectives are put into play. If it wasn’t for the artwork, this part would’ve probably brought this series down pretty badly. In fact, the artists for this series have done a marvelous job and set out a great tone throughout the whole volume. Every character looked amazing, frightening, chilling and stunning. Tony S. Daniel sadly doesn’t pull any tricks out of his sleeves for the remainder of the volume. Complimented by his brilliant art, the writing doesn’t bring anything new to the story. It essentially points out the obvious and keeps the story simple without ever going into depth. Bathing in the mess it jumped into, it doesn’t help that there’s a bunch of secondary villains that are thrown into the mix. From their minimal panel time to their minimized threat level, these characters were a shame to look at. To top it off, there’s a little story regarding Hugo Strange that is simply dropped on our heads out of the blue. It actually doesn’t even regard him directly and completely destroys any flow the reader could’ve gained through the story. Imagine that. No regard for story-telling. Bye, bye, momentum. Sometimes I wonder if there’s this higher order that controls the creative team behind Batman : Detective Comics. I mean, how can you bifurcate so bad from a potential story you’ve built with the first couple volumes only to run into a disaster? There must be someone out there telling them: Hey guys, stop right there. We can't have you steal potential fans from the main Batman series. Just make it pretty enough to distract readers. And make sure to keep that story average. Thanks. Yep. That must be it. Batman : Detective Comics (Volume 1) – Faces of Death is a fun, but not brilliant debut. If anything, this is worth trying out for the love of Batman. It has potential and contains interesting angles that future volumes can easily draw upon. The artwork is undeniably beautiful and deserves to be salivated upon. Don’t get your drool all over it though. The writing will ensure of that. One thing to note is how every New 52 series run their own course, but there are Batman events that will affect all the series (like the events with the Owls; don’t worry if you don’t know what I’m talking about). Although Tony S. Daniel hasn’t managed to deliver an astounding first volume, it would be unfair to give up on this series. Through his artwork, you’ll still be impressed by the characters. You’ll be frightened by their sheer violence or stunned by their beauty. It's worth a go. Yours truly, Lashaan Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    SPOILERS The book is about as close to cookie-cutter Batman as you can get. It opens with Batman running across the Gotham skyline in pursuit of Joker. Cut to Arkham Asylum and Joker’s in a straitjacket talking menacingly to doctors and then inevitably he escapes. Then Batman is after Penguin who’s opened a new Iceberg Casino floating in Gotham Bay which leads to Penguin’s arrest. The book’s over. Ho hum. Despite the inclusion of these stalwarts of Batman’s rogues gallery, there are some more int SPOILERS The book is about as close to cookie-cutter Batman as you can get. It opens with Batman running across the Gotham skyline in pursuit of Joker. Cut to Arkham Asylum and Joker’s in a straitjacket talking menacingly to doctors and then inevitably he escapes. Then Batman is after Penguin who’s opened a new Iceberg Casino floating in Gotham Bay which leads to Penguin’s arrest. The book’s over. Ho hum. Despite the inclusion of these stalwarts of Batman’s rogues gallery, there are some more interesting villains thrown into the mix: Dollmaker is creepy with his collection of disfigured human dolls and the side story involving him removing Joker’s face was intriguing but didn’t go anywhere (probably to be explored in later volumes). There’s also a weird kid called Olivia whose dead eyes were unnerving as she played on peoples’ perceptions of what a pre-pubescent girl should behave like and came across as a psychopath in the early stages of development. But that’s pretty much where the good parts of the book end. The Joker storyline doesn’t really go anywhere, it leads to the Dollmaker and then just peters out – presumably we’ll find out what happens to Joker after his face was removed in another volume but it’s still an unsatisfying plot thread. The Penguin storyline turns into a dull heist involving Snakeskin and Mayor Hady’s foxy daughters. There’s even a strange scene involving protestors doing a kind of Occupy Movement demonstration supporting the Joker(!). I’ve read a few Tony Daniels Batman books he’s scripted and drawn - “Battle for the Cowl”, “Life After Death”, “Eyes of the Beholder” - and like those books “Faces of Death” shows that his artistry far exceeds his writing ability. He can’t seem to write an involving Batman book, it’s all just surface texture propped up by his excellent artwork, it never delves deep into the characters’ psyches. “Faces of Death” looks good but doesn’t have a solid storyline, it’s just a mishmash of villains with Batman chasing after them to no real purpose. It’s just a series of things that happen and they don’t feel connected or that they’re going anywhere new. Compared to Scott Snyder’s “Court of Owls” with its combination of focused original storyline, taut writing and great art, and “Faces of Death” comes off as amateurish and sloppy. Here’s hoping Daniels stays on as artist but is relieved of writing future titles. He just doesn’t cut it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    3.5 stars, rounded down. So many storylines left unresolved. Drives me crazy. How about finishing the joker story before starting the penguin story? The artwork is the best part of this volume,and is the reason it wasn't rated two stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lᴀʏᴀ Rᴀɴɪ

    I thought about giving a three out of five stars rating for Tony S. Daniel's first volume that is comprised of issues #1-7 for New 52's Detective Comics but quickly changed my mind when I took into account how much emotional abuse I endured while I was reading and reviewing each issue. It would have been a solid three but given how much this ruined an entire week for me, I felt obligated to shoot another star down and just give this a measly two for effort and visuals. I have stated time and tim I thought about giving a three out of five stars rating for Tony S. Daniel's first volume that is comprised of issues #1-7 for New 52's Detective Comics but quickly changed my mind when I took into account how much emotional abuse I endured while I was reading and reviewing each issue. It would have been a solid three but given how much this ruined an entire week for me, I felt obligated to shoot another star down and just give this a measly two for effort and visuals. I have stated time and time again that Daniel is a spectacular artist and his dynamic illustrations, particularly the action sequences and character poses/designs in this volume, are certainly the only things I love about it. The visual appeal is unmistakable. You can just look at the pictures and make up your own story too, if you want, which you might find yourself doing so instead of trying to understand the convoluted and often nonsensical plotlines that Faces of Death was all about. I don't care about anyone in the story, heroes or villains alike, because I don't understand the motivations driving these characters to make the choices that they have throughout the story--and how they go about these choices. Detective Comics as a title was supposed to showcase the crime-solving sleuth quality of Batman but much of the time in Daniel's story, all he did was employ violence every step of the way. I don't really feel like he's solving anything unless you count the number of times he beats up people as a way to get answers from everyone. Sure, Batman kicks ass but he's also the type to ask the questions either before or after the violent confrontation. He usually doesn't do this and doesn't bother unravelling whatever clues and threads he might find, seemingly more eager to jump from one action sequence to another in every issue. Whenever he does play detective, it comes off as pretentious and tacky as if Daniel doesn't even bother making it a serious venture and would rather make Batman utter cheesy lines that more than once made me cringe. Another thing that disappointed me about this volume is how fucking MISLEADING it tends to be. Just look at that main cover as well as the ones that heavily feature the Penguin. Trust me, their time on the pages have little impact and enjoyment to offer. As gratingly inconsistent the seven issues had been as a whole story, the one consistent thing Daniel does manage to do is short change his baddies where they don't ever have that much of a significant role to contribute in his plots. In the first two issues (which, in retrospect, were actually the only decent ones in the collection), we get a story about the Joker but we never, ever get an explanation or even a theory as to why he had his face surgically removed by the Dollmaker, which should have been an interesting moment. Frustratingly enough, the Dollmaker story arc that lasted four issues too long was also handled poorly. This chief villain just disappeared easily, I may add, because Batman just stopped caring halfway through like a child with an attention-deficit disorder, and focused his energies with the Penguin who was also cast aside to "develop" that character story concerning Charlotte Rivers and her evil twin, and it's not that engrossing. Like, AT ALL. Charlotte Rivers and her twin are unsympathetic and bland and there was no solid characterization that made me believe I should pay attention to what is happening in their cookie-cutter lives. To call them plot devices would be giving them the dimension they don't have. And then there's that bit about Hugo Strange's bastard son and I fucking hate anything with Hugo Strange in it so, nope, I would rather not discuss any more of that bullshit because it was a passing storyline that did nothing for the main story. Just explaining about the things that annoyed me the most while reading the issues is almost like re-living the horror for me so I'm going to end my review now. I also decided not to review the next issues (#8-12) individually anymore since they are written by Daniel again and I only plan to submit one review for the second volume that collects them. I just have to endure five more Daniel issues before I finally get to John Layman's run. NOT RECOMMENDED: 4/10 DO READ MY BATMAN COMICS REVIEWS AT:

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kuroi

    Ahem. There are two kinds of people in the world: the ones who believe Batman is the real personality and the ones that believe Batman is the persona. Ok, the latter camp is something I made up, but it was a cool way to open the review. Anyway, I belong to the third faction (population: 1) that believes that neither Batman nor Bruce Wayne is the real person, but something in between, a mixed personality that we never get to see. For the purposes of this review, let's refer to the middle ground betw Ahem. There are two kinds of people in the world: the ones who believe Batman is the real personality and the ones that believe Batman is the persona. Ok, the latter camp is something I made up, but it was a cool way to open the review. Anyway, I belong to the third faction (population: 1) that believes that neither Batman nor Bruce Wayne is the real person, but something in between, a mixed personality that we never get to see. For the purposes of this review, let's refer to the middle ground between Batman and Bruce Wayne as the Dark Knight. Why am I rambling on about this when you could be reading shorter and more informative reviews, you ask? It's because this story runs parallel to the Death of the Family arc (for a while anyway), and I have noticed an obsession with Batman writers (except maybe Snyder) regarding the Bat persona and neglecting the everyday side of Bruce. I get it, he's basically the Holy Grail of psychological trauma and the most successful case of daddy-issues, but I think occasionally it's okay to assume Bruce started off with his parents' death and now crime-fights for the sake of it. The best evidence for this neglect is in the art of this volume. Don't get me wrong, I really loved it for the most part and I stared geekily at some panels because they were so cool. But let's see how they treat Batman vs Bruce Wayne. Exhibit A: Ignoring the question of why the hell he looks like a tank, look at the detail on Batman. He's wearing an all black costume but you can see the rugged boots, the spikes on his gloves, every muscle. Now let's see Exhibit B: WHY THE FRICK IS BRUCE WAYNE'S FACE LIKE A GREEK VASE PAINTING? WHAT IS HAPPENING? Don't believe me? Take a look: It's as if they were all enthusiastic about every panel before and after this, but then suddenly realized they hadn't designed a face for Bruce, so they went with a basic geometric shape. Imagine my shock when I was chugging along and I suddenly got hit with a Lego head in a romantic scene. This happens in profile too, so the horror doesn't stop there. Though it softens up a bit in the last story, probably because it was a different artist? The story was basically ruined for me at this point because that head haunted me afterwards. I don't necessarily know that this one deserves the title of a detective comic because it doesn't seem any more investigative than some others I've read. I thought it had an okayish plot, with some predictable elements and sometimes they tried too hard to shock you a la the Dollmaker. Who was a pretty lacklustre character because he sorta appears, throws some minions at Bats and disappears. Actually, now that I think about it, they were trying to tell too many stories in the volume, so the problem was that you never became really invested in any of them. Like, why insert that truly random 5 pages of Catwoman and Eli Strange? WHY? It was just strange (pun intended). Overall, it felt the book was meant to be a hook for a number of other books, but flailed trying to balance that and it's own coherent plot. Not unlike a certain Marvel movie... *cough*Age of Ultron*cough* Oh, and they forgot to give Bruce a proper face, because they were so busy removing the Joker's. Sigh.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    I came for the Joker story because I was told this was the issue the doll maker takes his face, while this is true its very unfulfilling. You get some visuals of the removal but still no reasoning. The rest of the book is standard batman, the stories are fine but nothing amazing. The art is pretty good, its detailed and dark. I suppose if you want more batman, take a look but it wont be a keeper for me really.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This is the most disappointing new Volume of the Batman titles from DC's New 52. I say that because Detective Comics is a flagship title, not just an afterthought Batman title to make more $$, but it sure seems like it here. The writer, Daniel, is also the artist, and he's talented enough drawing Batman/Joker and Gotham. However, he's no Scott Snyder. Some of the dialogue seems to have been written by a teenager on steroids...LOTS OF YELLING!!! Also, there's some stupid stuff where characters ou This is the most disappointing new Volume of the Batman titles from DC's New 52. I say that because Detective Comics is a flagship title, not just an afterthought Batman title to make more $$, but it sure seems like it here. The writer, Daniel, is also the artist, and he's talented enough drawing Batman/Joker and Gotham. However, he's no Scott Snyder. Some of the dialogue seems to have been written by a teenager on steroids...LOTS OF YELLING!!! Also, there's some stupid stuff where characters outline to the reader exactly what they're doing, as though there's no way we could come to this conclusion ourselves. It's really disappointing because the first issue was a solid beginning, and it just went downhill from there. Were it not for Daniel's artistic skills, I'd probably have given this 1 star just because I was so irked with it being so lame. I almost stopped reading a few times, especially during the storyline with the Penguin's Iceberg Lounge. There's also a small story inserted involving Catwoman and Hugo Strange's son, which had me scratching my head, I'm hoping that is somehow relevant with the Catwoman book, otherwise it's just stupid here. Very disappointing, and hopefully some new writer takes this over and turns it around. When "Batman" by Scott Snyder is so good, "Detective Comics" needs to be just as good. Avoid unless you read all Batman stuff (like me) but go in knowing you'll likely be let down.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    I'll admit that you have to stuff up pretty badly to get less than a 4 star rating for me when it comes to Batman. I just love the character and most of the artists and writers know and understand him as he deserves. What makes Batman a great character is not just Batman or Bruce Wayne. Where Superman is made great by being Superman and balancing between saving everyone and also being Clark Kent Batman is great because of his famous rogues gallery and because of Gotham City. You don't get quite I'll admit that you have to stuff up pretty badly to get less than a 4 star rating for me when it comes to Batman. I just love the character and most of the artists and writers know and understand him as he deserves. What makes Batman a great character is not just Batman or Bruce Wayne. Where Superman is made great by being Superman and balancing between saving everyone and also being Clark Kent Batman is great because of his famous rogues gallery and because of Gotham City. You don't get quite the same connection to Metropolis and Superman's villains, with the exception of Lex Luther of course. This is part of the New 52 range, so of course there are some unique changes to the stories and ideas. I found that this contained two stories in its way. One of which was concluded at the end of the graphic novel and featured Penguin and his cronies, and the other which seemed set up for later revolutionary changes to the Joker character. Which remain to be seen - since unfortunately I couldn't find or buy the paperback follow up yet. So, of course I haven't said too much about this. I really can't find the words to do so and I apologise for that. Chances are if you are into Batman you'll like this work. If not you probably will be a little annoyed by it all. So very much recommended to mainly Batman fans.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Solid, if unspectacular, Detective Comics here is much better than when Tony Daniel was writing/drawing Batman pre-Flashpoint. The opening storyline with the Dollmaker is a bold start with some good ideas, but ultimately doesn't go anywhere special and both Joker and the Dollmaker get away far too easily. The second story featuring the Penguin is your run of the mill Penguin story. It's safe, it's easy, and it doesn't really try to be anything it's not. One day, someone will tell a truly great Pe Solid, if unspectacular, Detective Comics here is much better than when Tony Daniel was writing/drawing Batman pre-Flashpoint. The opening storyline with the Dollmaker is a bold start with some good ideas, but ultimately doesn't go anywhere special and both Joker and the Dollmaker get away far too easily. The second story featuring the Penguin is your run of the mill Penguin story. It's safe, it's easy, and it doesn't really try to be anything it's not. One day, someone will tell a truly great Penguin story, but it's not this one. Also, I expect to never see Charlotte Rivers again after this volume, another throwaway love interest. Oh, and Hugh Mayer vanishes after two issues too - keep track of your supporting cast, for crying out loud. The art is easily the main draw here; Daniel is a superb artist and his work doesn't diminish across the seven issues. It's just a shame that his writing leaves so much to be desired. This will appeal if you just want straightforward Batman adventures, but look elsewhere if you want something deeper than that.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    The first comic was my favourite! The last three were a bit inconsistent, I didn't see the connection between the different characters until the end. And I don't understand Strange's storyline in this, it didn't belong here at all. Still, I liked the first four comics. They were Batman-centered, too bad they didn't finish that storyline better.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Batman Detective Comics #1Oooooooo! The Joker being all crazy. Again. Who fucking cares anymore? How about a decade without Joker to make his pasty face relevant again. At least Tony S. Daniel added some freak called the Dollmaker to shake things up, and speaking of Daniel, he is the best Bat-artist (at least in my estimation) working on a Bat-book today.Batman Detective Comics #2Not much detecting happening in this "Detective" comic, and it is the detecting that I have always loved about Detect Batman Detective Comics #1Oooooooo! The Joker being all crazy. Again. Who fucking cares anymore? How about a decade without Joker to make his pasty face relevant again. At least Tony S. Daniel added some freak called the Dollmaker to shake things up, and speaking of Daniel, he is the best Bat-artist (at least in my estimation) working on a Bat-book today.Batman Detective Comics #2Not much detecting happening in this "Detective" comic, and it is the detecting that I have always loved about Detective Comics. I have never been a big fan of Batman as Dark Knight, having first loved him as Batman, The World's Greatest Detective. Now, though, he is just NSA Batman, and his Holmesian detection skills are long gone, having been replaced by torture, hyperactive surveillance and luck. Anyways, Bats walks into a trap, meets the Dollmaker, and we see that he's not alone. He is, it seems, the patriarch of a clan of skin peeling and knitting fiends (with one gratuitously-icky hot-naughty nurse. Not a fan of this touch, by the way), and they are all ready to rend the flexh off of Batman's body. So ... Art good. Creepiness okay. Detection nil. Story barely keeping me interested.Batman Detective Comics #3The Dollmaker and his helpers are definitely spooky (and the wonderful art surely helps), especially the levels of control the Dollmaker has over his helpers (family), but none of it excuses Batman's torture of Jack in the Box. Batman tries to break Jack in the Box, one of the Dollmaker family, with the goal of making JitB reveal the location of the Dollmaker family. He beats him mercilessly, fails to make his victim talk, then realizes that JitB doesn't have a tongue and couldn't have spoken anyway. So what does Batman do? He kicks him in the face and fucks off. Wouldn't it have been cooler by far to have Batman detect something, like the location of the Dollmakers, instead? Maybe even that JitB was missing a tongue before the beating? Your damn right it would have. Oh yeah ... there are multiple Jokers too. Yawn.Batman Detective Comics #4The Dollmaker story comes to a rather abrupt pause. Batman is "captured" then fights a bunch of thugs altered to look like Joker, then the shit hits the fan and their is the usual amount of violence is handed out and the Dollmaker escapes, but at least the Penguin is mentioned, so there's a chance for a classic, not-Joker villain for a bit. I'm not counting the Dollmaker out, however.Batman Detective Comics #5A short, short issue, this one. Batman protestors -- all sporting Joker masks -- are filling Gotham City's Old Grant Park, which pisses Batman off because he doesn't care about the public opinion that surrounds his "good works." He's too busy breaking up crime. Some masked bad ass shows up ahead of Batman during the crime he is trying to break-up, kills a bunch of gangsters, then slows Batman down and escapes. It starts and it's over, and then we're hanging out with the Penguin for a page at the grand opening of his Iceberg Casino. It is the most skeletal of stop gaps between issues where things actually happen (illness? lateness? I wonder what's to blame.). But there is a short story to fill space, so let's talk about that:Russian Roulette-- This is a nice, tight little tale introducing us to an interesting alliance between Catwoman and Eli Strange, son of Hugo Strange, the great underused villain of Batman past. The art is gritty, scrappy, hard to make out, and generally too intentionally messy to be truly welcoming, but it is effective, and when Catwoman is shedding blood it expresses the killing mood well. I am curious to see how this will link to everything else, but I won't be surprised if there is no link at all.Batman Detective Comics #6Wham!!! Suddenly the story is all complicated and cool, although that short issue last issue could have gone a long way towards cleaning up the mess that is this issue. Too much happens too soon, and before we know it Batman and Bruce's lover, Charlotte, are in a trap. Still, Penguin is busy playing the mastermind, putting a bunch of crimelords and supernaturally talented thugs under his thumb. Meanwhile, some jackpot named Snakeskin and his cycloptic colleague seem to be helping Penguin trap and do away with the Bat, being the hands in Penguin's typicaly hands-off scheming. And there was a little bit of genuine detection going on at the beginning of the story. Unfortunately the detection had already happened and we were only "told" about the detection, but it was nice to see a hint of detection that had nothing to do with assault even if it was only narration in three panels. It's something, at least. Batman Detective Comics #7This underwhelming arc comes to a close much too quickly. Too complex for two issues. Once again a lack of any serious detecting by Batman (most of his conclusions this time come from stumbling upon things as they are happening and everything to do with doggedness and nothing to do with intelligence). No emotional core (as there was in New 52's Batman and Batman & Robin). And no clear consequences or conclusions. All of these flaws solidify that this is the worst opening for all of the New 52 Bat-titles, and considering the quality of the others it is a massive let down.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    The collection contains the first seven issues of DC’s rebooted Detective Comics series. After 74 years and over 880 issues, Detective Comics finally launched its second series as part of DC’s New 52 campaign. Since 1939-1940 this series has been essentially a Batman title, and that hasn’t changed in its new iteration. Whether this was a conscious decision or not, the New 52 version seemed to me like a darker, grittier series than the relaunched Batman: this collection features a truly creepy vi The collection contains the first seven issues of DC’s rebooted Detective Comics series. After 74 years and over 880 issues, Detective Comics finally launched its second series as part of DC’s New 52 campaign. Since 1939-1940 this series has been essentially a Batman title, and that hasn’t changed in its new iteration. Whether this was a conscious decision or not, the New 52 version seemed to me like a darker, grittier series than the relaunched Batman: this collection features a truly creepy villain named the “Dollmaker,” a rather serious child abduction plot, and the Joker getting his freaking face cut off. Now, I am not immune to the charms a good face-removal story can provide. But to be done correctly, a face-swapping story requires delicate tact, real emotional depth, and (most importantly) writing/acting on a sublime, almost superhuman level. To wit: Unfortunately, this collection was not quite as spellbinding as watching John Travolta and Nicholas Cage attempt to out-ham each other for two hours. The first half was not bad, but a little icky with the face-slicing and the child abductions and everything. The second half (featuring a Penguin story) was kind of forgettable, with the exception of a pretty cool setting. The art was good, and overall this book was a solid “OK.” I thought it was a bit of a letdown after Batman, Vol. 1: The Court of Owls, which I really enjoyed, but it certainly wasn’t bad. 2.5 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    I enjoyed it but I don't know if it has the re-readability of the other New 52 Batman titles.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    Tony S. Daniel draws better than he writes, which means he's an OK writer, but a great artist. The "Dollmaker" arc was frankly just gross, but the second arc, involving a heist of the Penquin's "Iceberg Casino" left me with a good feeling toward the book as a whole.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nerdish Mum

    Review to follow.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    What's the deal with Bruce Wayne and girlfriends? I mean, I get it. Who isn't into hot babes? But my question is, Why do people who write Batman comics include a girlfriend angle? I have to say, Bruce Wayne's girlfriends must be the least interesting aspect of most Batman stories. Think about it. This is a guy who flies around in jets and speedboats, is a martial arts expert, has all kinds of crazy gadgets, and I'm being told about a date he went on to some stupid ball? Hell, I get bored when my What's the deal with Bruce Wayne and girlfriends? I mean, I get it. Who isn't into hot babes? But my question is, Why do people who write Batman comics include a girlfriend angle? I have to say, Bruce Wayne's girlfriends must be the least interesting aspect of most Batman stories. Think about it. This is a guy who flies around in jets and speedboats, is a martial arts expert, has all kinds of crazy gadgets, and I'm being told about a date he went on to some stupid ball? Hell, I get bored when my friends tell me about the people they're dating sometimes, and the closest thing my friends do to Batman shit is rolling out of bed at 1 on Sunday, holding a comforter around themselves in somewhat cape-like fashion. And why do we always have this conversation: Alfred: Master Wayne, your date with Carmen DeSexia is this evening. Batman: Cancel it. The Joker's on the loose. Alfred: I shall send my regards. If I may, perhaps it's best to let her go. Batman: Not this one Alfred. This one is special. Really? This one? THIS ace reporter, one of the hundreds of attractive ace reporters you've dated, is the special one? Would you say it's because she's attractive, or is it more because she gets super upset when you cancel dates, or is it because you, for absolutely no reason, think this is the one girlfriend who isn't being used by one of your enemies in order to find out your secrets? If there's some story to it or some appeal, by all means, bring on the lovey dovey stuff. But if it's just some other lady who doesn't understand an appropriate cleavage amountage for being on the news, or if it's some shape-changing monster on the attack, or if it's both and I'm left feeling very confused about my sexuality, I'm giving everyone permission to go ahead and skip it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    I really respect the "do it all approach" when an artist writes and pencils a title, something many people in the comics biz who were inspired by Jim Steranko have attempted, with decidely mixed results. So I'm willing to give Tony Daniel a lot of credit here for taking near-total charge of a major character's title (though, truth be told, with umpteen-million other Batman titles on sale the risk to DC was mitigated) and by and large pulling it off with a story that was both compelling both plot- I really respect the "do it all approach" when an artist writes and pencils a title, something many people in the comics biz who were inspired by Jim Steranko have attempted, with decidely mixed results. So I'm willing to give Tony Daniel a lot of credit here for taking near-total charge of a major character's title (though, truth be told, with umpteen-million other Batman titles on sale the risk to DC was mitigated) and by and large pulling it off with a story that was both compelling both plot-wise and visually. I mean, it's not everyday you get to see an image like this! I concur with many who have complained that the second-half of the volume drags a bit compared to the craziness of the Dollmaker plotline, and I can see the point but I did enjoy seeing The Penguin as a vicious and worthy adversary, a real criminal's criminal who preys on and double-crosses any and all he comes across. It's nice to have a bat-villain who's not bat-shit crazy, just evil and eccentric every now and again. One final quibble: what's the deal with Bruce Wayne having a different GF every single title/volume? And since they're all, obviously, stunningly gorgeous and mostly brunettes it's getting hard to differentiate.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    Tony S. Daniel deserves props for both writing and illustrating this title on his own. Well done, sir! Unfortunately, I can't really say much about the story itself that is positive. I found the plot to jump around quite a bit and it was hard to tell what was going to happen next. He starts with the Joker prominently featured on the cover with quite a shock at the end of Issue 1 and we don't revisit that plot again at all in this volume. Then we switch to another (somewhat connected) villain named Tony S. Daniel deserves props for both writing and illustrating this title on his own. Well done, sir! Unfortunately, I can't really say much about the story itself that is positive. I found the plot to jump around quite a bit and it was hard to tell what was going to happen next. He starts with the Joker prominently featured on the cover with quite a shock at the end of Issue 1 and we don't revisit that plot again at all in this volume. Then we switch to another (somewhat connected) villain named Dollmaker who is terrifying but in a Prof Pyg via Grant Morrison sort of way. Then we move to another villain named Snakeskin and then eventually throw Penguin into the mix. The most compelling character in the story is Olivia who is a little girl originally kidnapped by the Joker and then things just go from bad to worse. The focus of this title is supposed to be the early days of Batman and Tony S. Daniel really strives to show a Batman who is definitely still a somewhat green detective trying to work things out with the aid of the always helpful Alfred. The artwork was pretty great and there were moments I really enjoyed, but overall this title suffers from really sporadic disjointed storytelling. Frankly, I believe Tony S. Daniel is trying to do too much. The other main Batman title (penned by Scott Snyder) is a good example of a title making a simple plan and working at a good pace to fully realize that plan. Unfortunately, this does not have nearly the focus of the other Batman title.

  23. 4 out of 5

    William Thomas

    I'll always remember Tony Daniel for being the guy who made X-Force one of my favorite books of the 90's. His art wasn't as tight oor sleek and slick as other artists like Jim Lee. It was more chaotic, rough and stylistically set apart from the rest of the X books and Marvel in general. After he left to work on Spawn, I didn't really care for any of his work. It all looked like Mcfarlane copycat stuff. Even his work for DC before the reboot still had traces of Mcfarlane in it. But now, Tony Dani I'll always remember Tony Daniel for being the guy who made X-Force one of my favorite books of the 90's. His art wasn't as tight oor sleek and slick as other artists like Jim Lee. It was more chaotic, rough and stylistically set apart from the rest of the X books and Marvel in general. After he left to work on Spawn, I didn't really care for any of his work. It all looked like Mcfarlane copycat stuff. Even his work for DC before the reboot still had traces of Mcfarlane in it. But now, Tony Daniel is closer to being himself in this volume of Detective Comics than at any other point in his career. His work is tighter than X-Force, but still has some of the chaotic pencil elements. He's discarded all of the unecessary detail that Mcfarlane throws into his work, all of the curly q's and minutiea that clogged every pore. Now, if we could just get the man to write a great story, we'd be set. "Faces of Death" isn't bad exactly, but it isn't memorable, either. Especially now when Scott Snyder keeps raising the bar in the Bat-books, it just feels like filler. I mean, it has everything you'd want- the Joker, a new sadistic serial killer, detecting, action, etc- but other than the one iconic image in the book (you'll know it when or if yu read it) there's nothing you'll remember about it a few days after you've read it. Writing: C Art: B

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emmett Spain

    A pitch-dark restart of Detective Comics showcases fantastic art but writing that let's the whole thing down--a beautiful to look at mess that pales next to Scott Snyder's focused storytelling. Ultimately the problem here is that the stories are of no consequence--it doesn't matter what happens as, outside of a huge revelation in issue one, the rest of the stories might as well not have happened. An empty, if very pretty, collection. Hopefully with Tony S. Daniel focusing on Detective Comics aft A pitch-dark restart of Detective Comics showcases fantastic art but writing that let's the whole thing down--a beautiful to look at mess that pales next to Scott Snyder's focused storytelling. Ultimately the problem here is that the stories are of no consequence--it doesn't matter what happens as, outside of a huge revelation in issue one, the rest of the stories might as well not have happened. An empty, if very pretty, collection. Hopefully with Tony S. Daniel focusing on Detective Comics after this arc (and dropping writing duties on The Savage Hawkman) the quality will improve.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mishap

    This re-boot starts out brutal--body parts style brutal--but segues to a slightly confusing plot line. I'm not sure if being a little clueless about what's going on is intended, I missed something, or the writer failing. For those who like harsh stories.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Šárka S.

    Kresba krásná, ale příběh sám o sobě nic moc.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Summer Tee

    That dollmaker/joker part really scare shit outa me. Been wanting to know how Joker got his face sliced off. It's fucking disgusting and creepy but I like how dark DC comics can get. The penguin's story was pretty good too.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Dark and gory, which is awesome, but just not substantial.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy 117

    Dull storytelling and a lack of genuine wit don't deter this Batman book from being a lot of gory, entertaining - if unremarkable - fun. The Joker is free, and has murdered - if Batman is to believed - hundreds of people. Batman hunts him down, fights him a bit, and, once he's locked in Arkham Asylum, he has his face cut off by Dollmaker, and escapes without a trace. Dollmaker continues his reign of terror with Joker gone, and Batman must fight his way through his butchered, psychopathic family i Dull storytelling and a lack of genuine wit don't deter this Batman book from being a lot of gory, entertaining - if unremarkable - fun. The Joker is free, and has murdered - if Batman is to believed - hundreds of people. Batman hunts him down, fights him a bit, and, once he's locked in Arkham Asylum, he has his face cut off by Dollmaker, and escapes without a trace. Dollmaker continues his reign of terror with Joker gone, and Batman must fight his way through his butchered, psychopathic family if he wishes to save an innocent, kidnapped girl, and ally Commissioner Gordon. At time of my writing this, Death of the Family has been and gone. We all know the Joker returns, we know his insidious and demented plans for his dangling, fleshy mass of face skin. As a standalone occurrence, though, Joker having his face cut off is, at best, a random event, that merely looks terrifying. Indeed, the image of Joker's iconic, grinning clown's face, nailed to the wall and bleeding profusely from behind, is a scary visage... but it's one that has absolutely no storytelling weight at all. This defines Tony S. Daniel's approach to Detective Comics. Unlike Scott Snyder's Batman, which relaunched at the same time, Detective Comics takes morbid gore, creative (if silly) new villains, and Batman grimacing and punching stuff... a few gadgets and vehicles, a bit of romance for good measure, puts it into a blender and mixes it up into a sludge, before throwing it haphazardly onto the page. The result is that Detective Comics is a fun read, filled with curious ideas and scenarios, but without any kind of thread that ties it all together - all style and no substance, and little heart. I, personally, can enjoy this. It's nothing special, especially considering Batman has such a long and storied history of genre-defining fiction, both in comics, television, and film. In a way, it reminds me of early Todd McFarlane Spawn - a childish mix of the macabre, explosions, and superheroic antics, with little defining structure beyond, "man, that looks cool." I appreciate that, and there is some cool stuff in this book - all of it daft beyond belief, but Daniel's art is gorgeous, and he renders everything from Dollmaker's hideous, butchered family, to Penguin's Iceberg Casino, with pop, with a zing! that makes it clear that, if nothing else, he's having fun writing and drawing Batman stories. I see no good reason you can't have fun alongside an author, even the most insipid - and Detective Comics Volume 1 isn't insipid. It hardly redefines Batman as a character - hell, it hardly acknowledges beyond the most basic of characterization. Instead, it pits Batman against villains new and old, it looks good doing it, and, though not even close to being in the same ballpark as Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's efforts, provides an adequate Batman-flavoured ride that fans of the character can certainly enjoy at the most skin-deep level. There's no immediate reason to pick this up - it's hardly a must-read - but you wouldn't regret it if you did.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Review originally posted here. Why I Read It: I love love love Batman, and this is a part of my challenge to read as much of the New 52 as possible. I did go in with some trepidation though -- one of my really good friends who is a fellow comic book geek warned me that the new line of Detective Comics isn't up to snuff.. I wanted to try it anyway for curiosity's sake. Well, my friend was right. This volume of Detective Comics was a mess I tell you. MESS! It's sad because the first issue looked pro Review originally posted here. Why I Read It: I love love love Batman, and this is a part of my challenge to read as much of the New 52 as possible. I did go in with some trepidation though -- one of my really good friends who is a fellow comic book geek warned me that the new line of Detective Comics isn't up to snuff.. I wanted to try it anyway for curiosity's sake. Well, my friend was right. This volume of Detective Comics was a mess I tell you. MESS! It's sad because the first issue looked promising. That last panel with the Joker? Chilling stuff. But then the rest of the volume barely touched on that story. There was some stuff with the doll guy, but it somehow branched off into the Penguin and his new casino which became it's own story. It was all so scatterbrained. There was no cohesiveness. Batman was apparently solving mysteries, but things were popping up left and right out of nowhere and I couldn't keep up. It's kind of hard to when the writer is throwing things at you from all sides and not letting everything come together on its own. I actually finished this almost two weeks before writing this, and I've forgotten pretty much... everything that happened. Except for the first issue. The art was fine, but I keep repeating how I'm not a fan of the typical American comic book look, and this is definitely in that camp. Batman is built like Arnold Schwarzenegger (seriously, I know superheroes are probably built, but they're all SO BUILT!!) and has a ridiculously chiseled jaw etc. It's not my thing, but it's perfectly fine for the medium. OH, and another thing. Like Green Lantern, I was not at all a fan of the romance here. I am so sick of reading comic books where the female love interest is totally into the male superhero even they're hard-to-get assholes who blow them off all the time. Charlotte digs Bruce BECAUSE he plays hard-to-get? And she forgives him of all fouls when he does bother to show up? And he assuages her with gifts and money? Gross. Is this whole idea of chicks digging hard-to-get guys some kind of male fantasy? Because it's annoying. Final Verdict: This first volume of the new launch of Detective Comics was a hot-mess. The story (or stories I guess) lacked cohesiveness and I constantly had information flying at me from all sides, creating a big jumbled mess. I was also extremely annoyed with the romance angle of the story, and Charlotte's draw to Bruce because he's elusive and "hard to get". I get that some girls like that kind of thing, but do all female love interests in comics need to be into it? It's annoying. The art was fine, but not mind-blowing. All in all, my friend was right and I probably just shouldn't have bothered. Will I read more?? ...Maybe. I'm still curious if they're going to go back to the story of the first issue, which I DID actually like. It was a promising start... it's just too bad it devolved from there.

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