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The Eyes of the Dragon PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Eyes of the Dragon
Author: Stephen King
Publisher: Published May 13th 1993 by Time Warner Paperbacks (first published February 2nd 1987)
ISBN: 9780751504576
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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A fantasy of heroic adventure, set in the kingdom of Delain. It involves a king who is poisoned, a young and beautiful queen, a prince locked in a high tower while his younger brother assumes the throne, and an evil magician who harbours terrible secrets and malevolent plans.

30 review for The Eyes of the Dragon

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Tivendale

    When the majority of individuals think about Stephen King's credentials; it is generally about his amazing work-rate at producing memorable and top quality horror stories. With that in mind; in addition to The Dark Tower saga, this novel is one of Mr.King's lesser known creations that is definitely more Tolkien than Tommyknockers. It is an easy story to get into and I was intrigued from the first page. My grandfather gave me this book when I was a wide-eyed, eleven-year-old lover of Goosebumps b When the majority of individuals think about Stephen King's credentials; it is generally about his amazing work-rate at producing memorable and top quality horror stories. With that in mind; in addition to The Dark Tower saga, this novel is one of Mr.King's lesser known creations that is definitely more Tolkien than Tommyknockers. It is an easy story to get into and I was intrigued from the first page. My grandfather gave me this book when I was a wide-eyed, eleven-year-old lover of Goosebumps books as I possessed pretty good reading skills for that age and I loved every second of this tale back then. Memories of the book from 19 years ago are of course hazy so I am glad I picked it up again - half for the nostalgia but also to delve back into the mythical land of Delain which lurks somewhere within Mid-World. The book is presented by an omnipresent narrator who may very well be Stephen King himself. This story was written and dedicated to his daughter Naomi after all. The storyteller keeps us updated with his opinions, lets us know the personae's thoughts and motives throughout the plot and reverts back to us as a reader to find out how we are getting on. It is a nice touch for a pleasant story. It follows the royal family of Delain. King Roland the Good is an average monarch. He loves his alcohol, hunting and is just generally an okay guy. He reminded me of Robert Baratheon from Game of Thrones. His defining feat was killing the last known dragon - the head of which remains in his drawing room as a trophy. In his later years when his subjects are worried at a lack of an heir - he is introduced to a witty, charming, younger lady called Sasha and thanks to a couple of magic potions to aid sexual prowess two children are born. Peter and Thomas. All seems nice and happy so far. Peter grows to be a strapping, proud and honourable young gentleman who everyone agrees will make a great next king. Well, all except one person... I forgot to mention The Eyes of the Dragon includes one of the most infamous, notorious villains in fiction - a gentleman (or demon perhaps) called Flagg happens to be the King's aide and black magician. Flagg goes by many names in Stephen King's novels - The Man In Black, The Walkin' Dude, Randall Flagg etc... If you are familiar with King's books you probably know this dude from Dark Tower and The Stand amongst others. To summarise: He is one evil muthaphuckka. On a grim day in Delain - The King is poisoned with a vile substance called Dragon Sand which burns victims from the inside out and next in line to the throne Peter is incorrectly judged to have committed the said regicide, therefore, is placed on the top floor of The Needle for eternal imprisonment 300 feet above the ground. In lieu of this, Roland's younger, weaker, more impressionable son becomes King - and guess who is whispering in his ear about how to rule the land? Following this, we are dealt a slightly predictable but still utterly entrancing narrative that composes a state of mind to the readers where hope, belief, friendship and desire are the real magic in a story that is polluted by Flagg's plotting, deceit and all sort of macabre magical nastiness. The story revolves around a dolls house, an endless supply of napkins, a mouse, a two headed parrot and a very clever wolf-dog called Frisky who is presented with charming childishly human qualities by the narrator. A lot of the supporting cast who I have not even mentioned are well created and add to the overall quality of the tale. My copy of the novel also included some amazing fantastical art including Frisky, the dragon, a lost looking rabbit, the wizard and such which was a very nice touch. I guess you need to read this so you will know what was seen when someone on the secret passage looked through the eyes of the dragon and how it impacts on this awesome story. James x www.youandibooks.wordpress.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    4.5 stars! Hands down, this is my FAVORITE Stephen King book. I'm not saying this is his best piece of work, but (personal preferences 'n all) this is just what I happen to enjoy the most. So. Erica has a stellar review that explains why this book should be revered above all other King books. And also touches another review that is total crap, written by a man who can normally be counted on to give good book recommendations. Even though he tends to ramble, and add musical lyrics to all his reviews. A 4.5 stars! Hands down, this is my FAVORITE Stephen King book. I'm not saying this is his best piece of work, but (personal preferences 'n all) this is just what I happen to enjoy the most. So. Erica has a stellar review that explains why this book should be revered above all other King books. And also touches another review that is total crap, written by a man who can normally be counted on to give good book recommendations. Even though he tends to ramble, and add musical lyrics to all his reviews. And doesn't actually talk about the book half of the time. Or, let's face it, make sense. Because he's old. And weird. Probably even smelly...but I have no proof of that one. Still. He's our friend. Most days. Anyhoo. This one is actually a fairly simple fantasyish tale. The Fearsome Dragon... The Wise and Beautiful Queen... The Evil Sorcerer... The Decent but Stupid King... The overlooked, sad, spiteful, kinda stupid, (Baby-Brother) Prince... Prince... actual size may vary Oops! Wait. The Good and Decent Hero Prince... The thing that I love about this story, is that it has that classic good over evil vibe to it. There are twists, but nothing mind-blowing. It reminds me of the kind of fairytale/fantasy stuff my mom would read to me before bedtime. Well. Ok. She never read me anything with adult content in it, but that's not what I'm talking about. This is just... Good wins and Evil takes a beat-down. Sometimes it's nice to pretend that you're a kid, and you still believe that you know? Be noble, be kind, do the right thing...and everything will work out. Remember that? sigh So, that's why I love this one. The End.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Delee

    When I was a little girl my mother and father would tuck me in at night and read me a bedtime story. At Christmas and Easter- I would have the pleasure of listening to bedtime stories made-up by my father, just for me- Delee. The Adventures of the Pink Kitty...about a very special kitten making his way to a very special child.....and his adventures along the way trying to find a home with the perfect little girl. ME!!! It wasn't a logical story...it probably wasn't the best story out there- but When I was a little girl my mother and father would tuck me in at night and read me a bedtime story. At Christmas and Easter- I would have the pleasure of listening to bedtime stories made-up by my father, just for me- Delee. The Adventures of the Pink Kitty...about a very special kitten making his way to a very special child.....and his adventures along the way trying to find a home with the perfect little girl. ME!!! It wasn't a logical story...it probably wasn't the best story out there- but to me it was magical. THE EYES OF THE DRAGON is another kind of bedtime story. A bedtime story KING style!! Noooo pink kitties here. In a fairy tale past- there is a relatively happy Kingdom of Delain- with the dragon slaying King Roland, his young wife Queen Sasha, and their sweet, perfect, little boy Peter...but there also is evil in Delain-a magician by the name of Flagg. Who is also unfortunately...Roland's adviser. Flagg's goal is to make this Kingdom...less happy- and he comes up with a plan. A plan that doesn't involve Queen Sasha...or a sweet, perfect, heir to the throne. So he schemes... ...and he schemes. Sasha dies in childbirth- and Thomas is born. A not so perfect child- who Flagg takes under his wing... ...and when the time is right- all the pieces fall into place. ...but there are a few snags in his wicked plan- Flagg is not aware of- that may or may not come back to haunt him later. This is one of my Favorite King books. It speaks to my inner child..and from time to time SHE still enjoys fairy tales and bedtime stories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Napkins? Napkins. And more than enough (too much) nose picking and boogers. Stephen “I dressed up like Jack Vance for Halloween” King made a noteworthy switch from straight up horror to a better than passable high fantasy in his 1987 novel The Eyes of the Dragon. The King of American horror, though, is also a better than average writer and knows a thing or two about moving some copy and though this is a little out of character (like Henry Fonda in Once Upon a Time in the West) it is also entertainin Napkins? Napkins. And more than enough (too much) nose picking and boogers. Stephen “I dressed up like Jack Vance for Halloween” King made a noteworthy switch from straight up horror to a better than passable high fantasy in his 1987 novel The Eyes of the Dragon. The King of American horror, though, is also a better than average writer and knows a thing or two about moving some copy and though this is a little out of character (like Henry Fonda in Once Upon a Time in the West) it is also entertaining and delivers a fantasy gem. Vaguely reminiscent of Neil Gaiman’s Stardust, in tone if not in theme, this change of pace, to this humble reader at least, most notably features his epic villain Randall Flagg, in this work simply Flagg, the king’s magician. King has created in Flagg a universal boogeyman, a timeless and undying human darkness that plays in a score of nefarious roles. But more than just a plug and play antihero, Flagg becomes a recurring evil in a mythos built on bad. A good fantasy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    "Book, you have the right to a speedy trial" review THE DEFENSE - He may have switched from horror to fantasy with this one, but Stephen King's trademark gripping prose is still in full force! - A scene-stealing villain who creates chaos and is just so much fun to watch, Flagg would fit right in at Gotham City! - Despite the fantasy setting, the emotions of the characters always feel real. - King takes some narrative risks that really pay off. (The segments told through the POV of a dog are "Book, you have the right to a speedy trial" review THE DEFENSE - He may have switched from horror to fantasy with this one, but Stephen King's trademark gripping prose is still in full force! - A scene-stealing villain who creates chaos and is just so much fun to watch, Flagg would fit right in at Gotham City! - Despite the fantasy setting, the emotions of the characters always feel real. - King takes some narrative risks that really pay off. (The segments told through the POV of a dog are particularly effective.) THE PROSECUTION - Very little action for a fantasy novel... (putting "Dragon" in the title when the dragon is only in the book for about two pages...that's downright cruel, Mr. King!) - The book's fairy-tale narrative voice may not be for everyone. (King often speaks directly to the reader, like Aesop speaking to a crowd, which some might find off-putting.) - Story drags a bit in the final act. THE VERDICT A fractured fairy tale as only Stephen King can deliver, this book is perfect for someone who wants to see an author step out of their comfort zone and try something new!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ɗẳɳ 2.☊

    At its time of publication, way back in 1984, The Eyes of the Dragon was a bit of a departure from Stephen King’s typical horror fare. I wouldn’t say it was his first venture into the fantasy genre, per se, considering the iconic Gunslinger (the first of the Dark Tower books) was released a few years prior to this one, but I do believe it was his first attempt at a novel length fairy tale. It makes perfect sense that King would dedicate this story to his daughter, considering the cutesy feel to i At its time of publication, way back in 1984, The Eyes of the Dragon was a bit of a departure from Stephen King’s typical horror fare. I wouldn’t say it was his first venture into the fantasy genre, per se, considering the iconic Gunslinger (the first of the Dark Tower books) was released a few years prior to this one, but I do believe it was his first attempt at a novel length fairy tale. It makes perfect sense that King would dedicate this story to his daughter, considering the cutesy feel to it all. Our story is told through an unknown narrator, who often pauses to interject his own thoughts directly into the narrative. I pictured this as a father reading a bedtime story to his daughter, occasionally stopping to discuss what they’ve read. Similar in style to something like The Princess Bride. However, whereas The Princess Bride was a swashbuckling tale of adventure and romance set in a magical land chock-full of unforgettable characters—a story of betrayal and revenge and that oh so important TRUE LOVE—The Eyes of the Dragon is a rather simplistic tale of a fat, dimwitted, slovenly king, Roland, his two sons, and an evil magician’s attempt at destroying their kingdom. It truly pales in comparison. The king’s first born son, Peter, is kind and generous and much loved, and by all accounts, quite brilliant. While the second son, Thomas, is cut from the same cloth as his father. Fearing that the brilliant princeling may one day muck-up all of his nefarious plans, the magician, and adviser to the king—let’s call him Flagg—devises a way to remove Peter from the equation altogether, before he’s ever given the opportunity to assume the throne. The majority of the story finds Peter attempting to wiggle free of the Flagg’s web. Stupidly enough, after five long years of struggle and planning, Peter’s ultimate success or failure will hinge entirely on dreams and dumb luck (or is it ka?). King’s endless desire to foreshadow events effectively undercuts much of the tension and mystery throughout. Seemingly chopping the legs out from under his story at every turn. It’s quite odd, honestly, his strange compulsion for spoiling stories. A compulsion which, sadly, often extends to him spoiling other writer’s stories as well. In summary: The Eyes of the Dragon is a straight forward fairy tale, light on mystery and intrigue, and too drawn out for my taste. What little action occurs could have easily been told in half the number of pages or less. The only Dark Tower tie-ins are a couple of familiar names, the central location, and one main character. Not nearly enough to make it worth the effort, in my opinion. It’s also worth noting that, following the lukewarm reception, and outright rejection of this story from many of his diehard fans, King penned his famous Misery book. A story of an author kidnapped and chained to his desk, and forced into writing only those types of stories that his fans demanded. 2 Stars – For completionist only, or a younger audience fond of simple fairy tales. Favorite quote: She had never seen a man with his drawers off before her wedding night. When, on that occasion, she observed his flaccid penis, she asked with great interest: “What’s that, Husband?” . . . “It is King’s Iron,” he said. “It doesn’t look like iron,” said Sasha, doubtfully. “It is before the forge,” he said. “Ah!” said she. “And where is the forge?” “If you will trust me,” said he, getting into bed with her, “I will show you, for you have brought it from the Western Barony with you but did not know it.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Swaps55

    i need to preface this by saying that this was the first stephen king book i ever read. he is my father's favorite author, and i grew up staring at the dozens of hardback books all in a row on the shelves of his office, all with king's name on them. i really wanted to read one, see what it was dad read, and the reason he handed me this one was the same reason king wrote it: so his kids could read something he had written. in other words, it's kid-friendly, and actually written as a children's bo i need to preface this by saying that this was the first stephen king book i ever read. he is my father's favorite author, and i grew up staring at the dozens of hardback books all in a row on the shelves of his office, all with king's name on them. i really wanted to read one, see what it was dad read, and the reason he handed me this one was the same reason king wrote it: so his kids could read something he had written. in other words, it's kid-friendly, and actually written as a children's book (don't be fooled, though. there is plenty of poisonings, death, betrayal, etc, and the villain is flagg, of the stand fame). that said, it could be that my love for this book the second time around as an adult is deeply rooted in that first reading as a kid, meaning it could be that if you read it for the first time as an adult you might not feel the way that i do about it. think reading the hobbit vs. reading lord of the rings, and that's about the comparison to it and normal king fare. the story itself could almost be considered stock fantasy, but the characters are brought to life with the amazing skill that you come to expect from stephen king. you have the kingdom of delain, ruled by king roland. roland has two sons, peter and thomas. the elder peter is the golden child, with thomas always living in his shadow. roland himself is a weak king, a virtual puppet of his adviser, flagg. with peter poised to take the throne after roland dies, flagg must see to it that somehow thomas, the weaker son who more resembles his father, is the one actually crowned king. this doesn't sound to original, does it? but i doubt you can find a story in which you feel such compassion for the spineless king roland, awe and respect for the venerable prince peter, and sympathy blended with shame for thomas. it's a quick read, engaging, and skillfully told. if you want a fantasy story that will bring you back to your childhood, this is it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    StoryTellerShannon

    I read this about ten years ago and just read the book again about two years ago. Well, I'm delighted to say that it still has all its magic. As an aspiring writer, I was breaking down the story, trying to figure out what made it special. It's not so much the setting as there are many fairy tale legends which are similar to this one . .. nor is it the actual idea as many good princes have been unjustly imprisoned and then tried to redeem themselves later. This tale's strength is in its narrative p I read this about ten years ago and just read the book again about two years ago. Well, I'm delighted to say that it still has all its magic. As an aspiring writer, I was breaking down the story, trying to figure out what made it special. It's not so much the setting as there are many fairy tale legends which are similar to this one . .. nor is it the actual idea as many good princes have been unjustly imprisoned and then tried to redeem themselves later. This tale's strength is in its narrative prose as well as its nuances. The magical dollhouse, the napkins, the tidbits of legends, the extra push for detailing characters all explain why King is such a great storyteller. If you like King, read this. If you like fantasy, read this. If you like fairy tales, read this . .. although, be warned: this is not for children. OVERALL GRADE: A minus

  9. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 3.40 *** A buddy read with my fairy tales loving friends at BB&B!!! I have never jumped on the Steven King fan band wagon, but it was never because of his writing. It usually relates to the thematics and my inability to cope with thrillers and imaginative mind, which brings all his monsters to life and I just can't deal... However, this book is not his usual fair. It is a fairytale!!! And I am a humongous fan of anything resembling a classic fairytale or Fantasy... So, this is how several *** 3.40 *** A buddy read with my fairy tales loving friends at BB&B!!! I have never jumped on the Steven King fan band wagon, but it was never because of his writing. It usually relates to the thematics and my inability to cope with thrillers and imaginative mind, which brings all his monsters to life and I just can't deal... However, this book is not his usual fair. It is a fairytale!!! And I am a humongous fan of anything resembling a classic fairytale or Fantasy... So, this is how several BB&B members found ourselves reading this book. Mr. King wrote this in order to have something he created appropriate enough to read to his children when they were very young. And he did just that - he created a fairytale good for children as young as 6 and as old as time:-) I truly enjoyed the story. I also think, that if I had read it as a youth I would have rated it with all the stars. However, I am reading it in a ripe old age and although magically written, it was a bit too straight forward and linear for my expectations of the modern Fantasy genre. This in no way diminished it's value or enjoyment factor. It just made it a bit young and predictable for what we all have gotten accustomed to. Despite everything, it read really fast and I engulfed it in one sitting. As I said, I enjoyed reading this with friends and recommend it to all those young at heart - a simple story of good verses evil!!! I hope you all have a great time reading!!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erin ☕ *Proud Book Hoarder*

    3.5 “Once, in a kingdom called Delain, there was a King with two sons. Delain was a very old kingdom and it had had hundreds of Kings, perhaps even thousands; when time goes on long enough, not even historians can remember everything.” King used a unique narrative style for this fairy tale, where he flexes his writing muscle and offers something much different than his usual fare. Fans of the Dark Tower series will see some name similarities and tributes here like King Roland (much different pers 3.5 “Once, in a kingdom called Delain, there was a King with two sons. Delain was a very old kingdom and it had had hundreds of Kings, perhaps even thousands; when time goes on long enough, not even historians can remember everything.” King used a unique narrative style for this fairy tale, where he flexes his writing muscle and offers something much different than his usual fare. Fans of the Dark Tower series will see some name similarities and tributes here like King Roland (much different personality than our beloved gunslinger) and Flagg, who is as evil as always. Set in historical fantasy-land times, it's a story about two young brothers rising to become Kings while the kingdom is really being ruled by a demented magician. I loved how King tied in two childhood habits into the story later as major game changers. I enjoyed the characterization - Peter and his allies were formidable forces for good, Roland and Thomas among many who struggle between right and wrong, and then finally Flagg - pure evil badassness with his laboratory and potions. It follows fairy-tale tropes with kingdoms, towers, betrayals, and the day old struggle of brotherly love/envy and living up to a father's ideals. It's not gory, but there are disturbing scenes, such as the use of a certain dragon-influenced poison. King again indulges in weird body humor - scenes with the King farting and picking his nose. King does this often so I guess it's a humor he enjoys, although I could have done without some of the scenes. Gross! Overall it's a well written book and easy to follow, but the pacing lags after the first 1/4th. While the story is a good one, there's just not enough action and variances to justify it's length. Not ridiculously long at 380 pages, but my interest started waning.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Xime García

    ESTE LIBRO ME EN-CAN-TÓ! A veces, la gente tenía cosas raras. Lo terminé con una sonrisa. Fue como un helado de frutilla con salsa y frutillas y crema y compartido con la persona que te gusta. Sí, así se sintió. La historia no parece nada del otro mundo, y sin embargo, cuánto me gustó. Tenemos a Roland, un rey simplón y "patizambo"; a su hijo mayor, el príncipe Peter, buen mozo, inteligente y honesto; a su hijo menor, Thomas, celoso, inmaduro y temeroso; y, finalmente, a la estrella de la noche, e ESTE LIBRO ME EN-CAN-TÓ! A veces, la gente tenía cosas raras. Lo terminé con una sonrisa. Fue como un helado de frutilla con salsa y frutillas y crema y compartido con la persona que te gusta. Sí, así se sintió. La historia no parece nada del otro mundo, y sin embargo, cuánto me gustó. Tenemos a Roland, un rey simplón y "patizambo"; a su hijo mayor, el príncipe Peter, buen mozo, inteligente y honesto; a su hijo menor, Thomas, celoso, inmaduro y temeroso; y, finalmente, a la estrella de la noche, el mago oscuro Flagg. (SÍ, EL MISMO FLAGG QUE The Stand!!) La cuestión acá es que, como todo mago oscuro, Flagg quiere traerle desdichas a su reino, y provoca la muerte de Roland, encubriéndola para que parezca que fue Peter el culpable. Thomas, conocedor de la verdad, deja que su hermano sea encarcelado y recibe la corona en su lugar. Conflicto de hermanos, una tapadera para los verdaderos planes de Flagg. Sí, no es original. Pero lo que hace a este libro uno muy bueno no es la historia. Es la... Este libro no parece de King, y aun así, es tan de él como cualquier otro. King toma la voz narradora de un cuentacuentos de época que hace que me den ganas de ir hasta donde vive (probablemente en Maine, todos sus libros mencionan esa ciudad) y abrazarlo. Al principio parecía que se detenía en cosas que no interesaban o que no hacían a la historia, y uno las leía con humor, pero al final todo cierra, todo encuadra, y te das cuenta de que King realmente es el master of storytelling. La sencillez, la comodidad al narrar, y sin embargo, cuánto te hace sentir, y cuánto más te hace querer saber sobre lo que sucedió con sus personajes al terminar el libro. Ahora dejad que, en un abrir y cerrar de ojos, pasen de largo muchos años, pues una de las mejores cosas que tienen los cuentos es lo rápido que puede transcurrir el tiempo sin que nada notable esté sucediendo. En la vida real nunca es de ese modo, y probablemente sea un buen síntoma. El tiempo solo pasa veloz en las historias, y ¿qué es una historia sino una especie de gran cuento en el que los siglos fugaces son sustituidos por años fugaces? Bastante. Aunque perdonado porque se trataba de un libro para niños y dedicado a su hija - lo cual, NO LES DA TERNURA?? La historia en sí, poca. Pero el título me parece de lo más original. No quiero decirles por qué lleva ese nombre pero es casi tan crucial como los personajes de Thomas y Peter. (view spoiler)[Arranqué pensando que lucharían contra un dragón, jamás de los jamases creí que se trataría de esa cabeza embalsamada... (hide spoiler)] El hecho de que fuese escrito para su hija hace que este libro se vuelva el doble de especial, y qué mejor manera de consagrar e inmortalizar a Naomi King sino creándole un personaje en esta historia. Hay una frase que dice que si "un escritor se enamora de ti, nunca morirás", y definitivamente Stephen King estaba enamorado de su hija. Debe seguir estándolo. También noté que el libro estaba dedicado a su "gran amigo", Ben Straub, y dudo mucho que el personaje Ben Staad haya sido creado así de la nada... me encanta leer las dedicatorias y los agradecimientos, soy una sentimental Flagg se había despertado. Creo haberos dicho que a veces el demonio es extrañamente ciego, y eso es cierto. A veces el demonio se aquieta, y duerme. Pero ahora el mago había despertado. Definitivamente. Si nunca leyeron nada de King, este libro les va a gustar mucho, aunque dudo de que sea el mejor para comenzar con algo de él, dado que difiere bastante (en todo) de los libros que suele escribir. Sin embargo, es obligatorio para todo fan de King y para todo fan de la fantasía.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stepheny

    Two of my favorite people have vastly different opinions on this book. Delee gave this book 5 glowing stars while Jeff gave it two and used such eloquent and moving words to explain what exactly he disliked so much about it. When Delee told me I had to read it I could not tell her no! Literally she has read every single book I have ever requested she read. Literally. She’s amazing. And I knew how much this book meant to her. And Jeff insisted I skip this book; that it just was not worth my tim Two of my favorite people have vastly different opinions on this book. Delee gave this book 5 glowing stars while Jeff gave it two and used such eloquent and moving words to explain what exactly he disliked so much about it. When Delee told me I had to read it I could not tell her no! Literally she has read every single book I have ever requested she read. Literally. She’s amazing. And I knew how much this book meant to her. And Jeff insisted I skip this book; that it just was not worth my time. But on my quest to read all of King’s books I knew I had to get to this one eventually. I just wasn't sure when because of the varying opinion among King fans. In the faraway land of Delain there resides a King. His name is Roland. *drops jaw* Yes. Roland. ERMAGERD. *coughs* Anyway, he is married to his beautiful wifey, Sasha. They have Le Petit Prince a sweet little Prince named Peter. Peter is instantly everyone’s favorite baby. He grows up to be a nice young boy that the kingdom is taken with. Everyone knows Peter is going to be the Greatest King of All Time. But Roland’s “advisor” has other plans. Mayhap you’re familiar with this “advisor”? He goes by the name Flagg…Randall Flagg. *jaw drops again* Flagg pulls a few strings to make the puppets dance. He gets Roland in bed with his wife again and BAM they are having another baby! And guess what?! It’s a boy! And guess what else?! Everyone’s favorite Queen dies during childbirth. The Kingdom mourns as much as the King and Prince. Meanwhile everyone ignores poor little Princeling, Thomas. He’s basically abandon by everyone, everyone that is, except for Flagg. Flagg has some tricks up his sleeve for sweet, naive little Thomas. And when King Roland is poisoned and Peter is imprisoned it is up to Thomas to rule the Kingdom…with help from his only friend. While I could appreciate what King was going for and I did enjoy the majority of the story there was just something I could not get behind. I can’t be ok with Thomas’ character. The whole time I read this I just felt so bad for him. He was born because Flagg made it so, he was abandon and utterly ignored because of Flagg, he was despised as a ruler because of Flagg. It made me so incredibly sad that this poor boy was subjected to such hate and abandonment while his brother was praised just for breathing or taking a shit. It really bothered me. I think I just have one of those hearts that is naturally drawn to the “weak”. All through high school I was the one trying to stick up for the less fortunate; trying to prevent bullying whenever I could. I felt that Thomas was never even given a fair chance and it broke my heart. The ending was a little bittersweet. I was hoping for some evil spell to be lifted where the people of Delain would love Thomas and realize what asshats they had been. I listened to this on audio and will at some point go back and read the physical book to see if I feel any differently about it. I landed safely in the middle on this one, but I’d like to give it a second chance later on in life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    To me it's pretty interesting that my favorite Stephen King book is not horror at all, but rather, fantasy. It makes sense, really. I don't enjoy reading about people being tormented and murdered. I like to read about people overcoming their fears and the villains they encounter in life. So it was nice to read a story by King in a setting I love, fairy tale land. This is a fairy tale, with all the usual trappings, and he does a great job with it. I think this story really shows what a good write To me it's pretty interesting that my favorite Stephen King book is not horror at all, but rather, fantasy. It makes sense, really. I don't enjoy reading about people being tormented and murdered. I like to read about people overcoming their fears and the villains they encounter in life. So it was nice to read a story by King in a setting I love, fairy tale land. This is a fairy tale, with all the usual trappings, and he does a great job with it. I think this story really shows what a good writer and a storyteller King is. There's no gore, shocking, horrific events. So the clarity of his ability to use words shines through. This is not a review so much as my thoughts on this book. In order to do a review justice, I'd need to reread this book. But I can say that I loved this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Well, that was different. Well written of course. It wasn't bad at all....Just not what I was expecting (or really wanted--see King's reaction to that view below--if we all would have loved this one--we would have missed out "miserably"). Perhaps I would have rated it higher if I knew what was coming....or what age group this is really written for? Or if I was extremely ill in bed slurping down chicken soup and my mom came in to read it to me (and blush at the mention of the King's "iron") Hmmmm. Well, that was different. Well written of course. It wasn't bad at all....Just not what I was expecting (or really wanted--see King's reaction to that view below--if we all would have loved this one--we would have missed out "miserably"). Perhaps I would have rated it higher if I knew what was coming....or what age group this is really written for? Or if I was extremely ill in bed slurping down chicken soup and my mom came in to read it to me (and blush at the mention of the King's "iron") Hmmmm. And...there is some to learn about the vile Flagg in this. He's very very old. The most interesting thing about this book was Stephen King's response to it's so-so-reception. He found out most readers didn't want a "fantasy" book from him. It seems he felt "chained" to his desk to write a certain type of book....namely, horror. So....he immediately wrote Misery, a book about an author being forced to write a type of book he didn't want to. And, ironically, it is one of his most horrific books..... So, I guess his fans won.....but he certainly didn't lose out either. Misery was one of his best book to film adaptations yet. (And I really hope the writing of it helped release his frustration at the ungrateful fantasy readers!) One final thing I heard....it's possible the Syfy channel is doing something with this book... could be interesting.... I'd probably give it a try.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn (devours and digests words)

    Once upon a time, in the kingdom of Delain far away.... Seriously, why didn't this book started that way? I can hear someone in the background barfing at the cheesiness of it but this chick right here lives for that kind of beginning in fairytales. ESPECIALLY in a Stephen King's book. The Eyes of The Dragon is all things fantasy. Something I have never read from The King of Horror. It's always a big fun to read an author stepping out of his usual comfort zone. And King nailed it! This book may Once upon a time, in the kingdom of Delain far away.... Seriously, why didn't this book started that way? I can hear someone in the background barfing at the cheesiness of it but this chick right here lives for that kind of beginning in fairytales. ESPECIALLY in a Stephen King's book. The Eyes of The Dragon is all things fantasy. Something I have never read from The King of Horror. It's always a big fun to read an author stepping out of his usual comfort zone. And King nailed it! This book may be purely set in a fantastical world but it does has King's usual grit, and lo and behold! The villain in the story is Flagg himself. Part time Royal Advisor, Part time Dark Magician. He whispers into King Roland The Good's ears, making him do as he[Flagg] bids. In a way, Flagg has the upper hand in controlling the whole kingdom. He is practically the ruler. When Peter was born, First son to Queen Sasha and Roland, Flagg felt that his lifelong plans will be thwarted. He sought to destroy the perfect prissy boy and leave the throne ready for his weak-willed little brother, Thomas. The better to control Delain and lead the kingdom into years of bloodshed. I fucking love this book. For so long, I've been searching up and down for a decent fairytale. I loaded myself with Young Adult fairytale retellings hoping it will sate my thirst but even those still left me empty. Meanwhile, this isn't decent. It's fucking great, more like. I love how it's written. (Duh, It's King!) The writing didn't peeved me off the way it did to some people. In fact, I'm really comfortable with Stephen King writing in the narration of a Storyteller. It's like he's directly talking to the readers and it made me feel more connected. I can find no flaws in this book. Good writing? Check. Solid characterization? Check. Amazing, spot on world building? Check. High dosage of tensions? Check. Legit villain? Check. Originality? Check. CHECK. CHECK. CHECK .CHECK. My nitpicky brain shut down and for once, I was actually reading words without a pause. I was reading in enjoyment. And that was so fucking great. I didn't miss out on the fact that one of the characters here is named after King's own daughter, Naomi. It's so sweet that he wrote this book for his little girl. That explains a lot of things to me because in some cases, I felt that things were toned down slightly here! I need more grit though and definitely more of Flagg. MORE. 5 stars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Nelson

    The Eyes of the Dragon is in my book a kid’s fantasy tale and one with a merrily joyous feel good factor, it was all just too nice and goodly good for me. If my only way of escape was to fashion a rope out of strands of napkin, worked on a toy and it was going to take over a year, then I'd have thrown myself out of the tower on day 3, fuck it as they say and goodbye happy ending.   Flagg is the man in black, the evil magician who's been around for ever, changing faces and involving himself in the The Eyes of the Dragon is in my book a kid’s fantasy tale and one with a merrily joyous feel good factor, it was all just too nice and goodly good for me. If my only way of escape was to fashion a rope out of strands of napkin, worked on a toy and it was going to take over a year, then I'd have thrown myself out of the tower on day 3, fuck it as they say and goodbye happy ending.   Flagg is the man in black, the evil magician who's been around for ever, changing faces and involving himself in the running of the kingdom of Delain for generations. He poisons the King and sets eldest son Peter up for the fall. A lifetimes imprisonment in the tower and then it's youngest son Thomas who takes over, subtly prodded by our man in black.   Peter is of course a lovely lad who everyone believes is guilty except a few friends, so he sets out to escape using the threads of many napkins tailored into rope, worked on a tiny loom or whatever it was and aaaaaaaah!!!! thunk.   Oh noooo, he's had enough after three weeks and chucked himself out, three hundred foot to the cobbles below. Ah fuck I was just getting into that and he's blown the ending, every goody fantasy trope blown to the wind all from a disappointing lack of endurance. Boys and dolls houses never end well, Oh well surprises all round there, totally unexpected and I have to say, well played.   Truth? Of course not, it all ends exactly as expected in a well written tale of loveliness. A 2.5* rating. Also posted at http://paulnelson.booklikes.com/post/...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This is one of Stephen King's fantasy offerings and it is quite delightful. I do not always enjoy adult fairy stories, but this one catches you up into the action and there is nowhere to go except to read and enjoy the whole book. The way the story is told is quite original. The chapters are all different lengths, sometimes just one paragraph, sometimes a normal length. Quite often the author lets the reader know what is going to happen and then goes back to fill in on how it came about that way This is one of Stephen King's fantasy offerings and it is quite delightful. I do not always enjoy adult fairy stories, but this one catches you up into the action and there is nowhere to go except to read and enjoy the whole book. The way the story is told is quite original. The chapters are all different lengths, sometimes just one paragraph, sometimes a normal length. Quite often the author lets the reader know what is going to happen and then goes back to fill in on how it came about that way. There's an evil wizard, a dragon, Kings, queens and princes and of course a prison cell at the top of a tower. All great stuff! I think one of the reasons I like King so much is that he is unpredictable yet always comes up with the goods.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    I understand that this was many readers' first King book. I understand that this book rests in the hearts of thousands. I understand this is meant to be a fairytale, and that I am not the target audience. I understand all that and I still choose to hate this book. How'd Bobby Brown put it... "It's my prerogative." The Eyes of the Dragon was slightly more bearable this go around because Laddie from Perfect Strangers read it to me, and I highly suggest you take the same route when/if you decide to I understand that this was many readers' first King book. I understand that this book rests in the hearts of thousands. I understand this is meant to be a fairytale, and that I am not the target audience. I understand all that and I still choose to hate this book. How'd Bobby Brown put it... "It's my prerogative." The Eyes of the Dragon was slightly more bearable this go around because Laddie from Perfect Strangers read it to me, and I highly suggest you take the same route when/if you decide to tackle this lesser-known fantasy novel. Bronson Pinchot's performance is fantastic, and lends entertainment value to some of the most boring shit King has ever written. There are only three major scenes in the book, and the plot doesn't even begin until a hundred pages in. That would be fine if this book was six- or seven-hundred pages long. But no. It's 380 pages long, with artwork and big-ass font to make the book seem thicker than it actually is. This book ties in very loosely to the Dark Tower books. Delain is mentioned in several DT novels, and Thomas and Dennis's names are dropped in The Waste Lands, but overall, I feel that this one happens outside of Mid-World, in perhaps another inscape that resides off to the side, much like our own whens. In summation: Not quite Young Adult because there's no trials-of-youth theme and nowhere near the quality of King's adult fiction, The Eyes of the Dragon is pretty much impossible to categorize in the King-verse. Recommended to King completionists only.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    "I think that real friendship always makes us feel such sweet gratitude, because the world almost always seems like a very hard desert, and the flowers that grow there seem to grow there against such high odds." A beautiful YA fantasy novel focusing on the tale of King Roland of Delain and his two sons, Peter and Thomas, with the story being told by an unknown narrator. King Roland is killed by an unusual poison, with his son Peter being accused of murder and imprisoned at the top of a high tower "I think that real friendship always makes us feel such sweet gratitude, because the world almost always seems like a very hard desert, and the flowers that grow there seem to grow there against such high odds." A beautiful YA fantasy novel focusing on the tale of King Roland of Delain and his two sons, Peter and Thomas, with the story being told by an unknown narrator. King Roland is killed by an unusual poison, with his son Peter being accused of murder and imprisoned at the top of a high tower, following the meddling of a certain Randall Flagg, the King's magician. What follows is an exciting story looking at themes including, but not limited to, friendship, loyalty, heroism and adventure. Stephen King? Young adult fantasy, you cry?! What's the Master of Horror doing in this genre? Part of the reason I found this book so sweet was that he had written it for his daughter Naomi. When she was young, he asked her what she liked reading about, and she said "Dragons", and this is what came next. He even named a minor character after her too - adorable! Initially I felt apprehensive as I'm not a huge fan of young adult, nor am I really into the fantasy genre, apart from a few exceptions (The Dark Tower series, Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones - okay, maybe I do like fantasy!!). This is also my friend Sadie's favourite King book, and she is a huge fantasy fan too, so there was also a little pressure to enjoy it, or else she might fly over here and resort to violence. But luckily within about 10 pages, I was hooked! One of the best parts about this book was meeting Randall Flagg again. That guy really is everywhere, scheming and causing trouble. This time, he wants to see the Kingdom of Delain crumble and fall, all whilst he hides in the shadows and watches. Another highlight for me was the narrator himself, the storyteller. No-one, and I mean no-one, can fill this role like Stephen King himself. When he tells his stories to us Constant Readers, it feels like we're all sitting around a campfire, elbows on our knees, head in our hands, absorbing it all. So it was fun for him to tell this story in a more traditional storyteller prose, similar to his introductions where he speaks directly to the Constant Reader. The illustrations in my edition were incredible too, I loooove illustrations. It really helps bring the characters and locations to life. This is a nice book to direct people towards if they don't like horror, but wish to read some Stephen King. It's also a nice starting point for young readers, a stepping stone to the more macabre and adult books. I can imagine myself reading this to a young child at bedtime (perhaps leaving out more adult parts at the beginning surrounding sex!). This book is really proof that King is able to transcend across any genre he likes. So far, I have read the following from King: horror, romance, fantasy, young adult, supernatural, sci-fi... the list goes on. And he has excelled at all of these. So, enough fangirling for now... I give this fairytale 5 stars out of 5! It appears I'll be taking a short break from King, but sometimes it's good to branch out to other authors. This is me trying to convince myself. Anyway...until next time! Long days and pleasant nights.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    This seems to be one of those books that people either love or hate—how strange to find myself right in the middle! I’ve never been one of King’s Constant Readers and have only read a few of his books over the last number of years. This one is written very much in the form of a fairy tale and is dedicated to his daughter, who may have heard the first versions of it as bedtime material? I was disappointed that the dragon of the title was only a mounted head on the wall—live dragons are much more This seems to be one of those books that people either love or hate—how strange to find myself right in the middle! I’ve never been one of King’s Constant Readers and have only read a few of his books over the last number of years. This one is written very much in the form of a fairy tale and is dedicated to his daughter, who may have heard the first versions of it as bedtime material? I was disappointed that the dragon of the title was only a mounted head on the wall—live dragons are much more entertaining. King recycles some material here—anyone who has read The Stand will recognize the villain, Flagg. There is also some overlap with the Dark Tower series. I found The Stand to be a very black & white tale, with very little nuance. The Eyes of the Dragon takes that to a whole new level, despite the fact that King tries very hard to convince us that Thomas isn’t as bad as he seems. However, that is the nature of fairy tales, so it fits in this case. I chose to read TEotD because it was on the NPR’s list of Science Fiction & Fantasy finalists back in 2011 (they were asking people of vote on the top titles in the field). Other children’s books were omitted from the list (e.g. Harry Potter) so I’m not sure how this one squeaked through to be included. It is the 232nd book that I have read from this NPR list.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Please note: The rating above is a spite rating, though, in all honesty, I'd have given this all the stars in 1987, too. However, I am spiting Jeff whose opinion is horrible and should be rectified with electro-shock therapy, or something. Interestingly, I'm stealing my review from a comment I made in another of his S. King threads. This is all getting very meta. Comment/Review: Aww, man! I loved The Eyes of the Dragon! It pissed my mom right off, though. She got it when it came out and was expecting Please note: The rating above is a spite rating, though, in all honesty, I'd have given this all the stars in 1987, too. However, I am spiting Jeff whose opinion is horrible and should be rectified with electro-shock therapy, or something. Interestingly, I'm stealing my review from a comment I made in another of his S. King threads. This is all getting very meta. Comment/Review: Aww, man! I loved The Eyes of the Dragon! It pissed my mom right off, though. She got it when it came out and was expecting...oh, probably what all King fans were expecting. I hated King's work at that age so HAD to read it when I found out my mom didn't like it. It became my most favorite book by him ever at that time. Of course, it was also an age-appropriate read for me and not so much for my mom.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaro

    Probably King’s most atypical novel. A fairytale-style story about two brothers disputing over the throne in a vague Kingdom where the power is manipulated byt the evil wizard Flagg. Not much reminds us that we are reading a book by Stephen King here. There’s Flagg, who is the most memorable part of this book, and then there are of course those boogers… It is told by a narrator from our time which at times feels a bit askew. The story has some nuance and atmosphere. Some parts hold together well Probably King’s most atypical novel. A fairytale-style story about two brothers disputing over the throne in a vague Kingdom where the power is manipulated byt the evil wizard Flagg. Not much reminds us that we are reading a book by Stephen King here. There’s Flagg, who is the most memorable part of this book, and then there are of course those boogers… It is told by a narrator from our time which at times feels a bit askew. The story has some nuance and atmosphere. Some parts hold together well, other parts feel jumbled and sketchy. I liked the dollhouse and the bit where the children play pretend games where ”indians” attacks the castle, a detail that throws the whole European fairytale thing off balance, in a good way.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amar

    “Did they all really live happily ever after? " A ja sam mislio da je knjiga puna zmajeva, i da im vazda gledamo u oči. Ali te oči ispadoše i metafora i bitan dio radnje. Veoma simpatična bajka za djecu, ali i za starije. Uglavnom ima sve što je potrebno za bajku; dobrog mladog princa, zao mađioničar(kojeg svaki poznavao Kingovog djela zna, RF), drugi dobri mladi princ kojeg je lako manipulisati i mnogo drugih klišea. Ali ovdje imamo i mnogo mnogo odličnih ideja, koje su mi se baš dopale, tipa sa “Did they all really live happily ever after? " A ja sam mislio da je knjiga puna zmajeva, i da im vazda gledamo u oči. Ali te oči ispadoše i metafora i bitan dio radnje. Veoma simpatična bajka za djecu, ali i za starije. Uglavnom ima sve što je potrebno za bajku; dobrog mladog princa, zao mađioničar(kojeg svaki poznavao Kingovog djela zna, RF), drugi dobri mladi princ kojeg je lako manipulisati i mnogo drugih klišea. Ali ovdje imamo i mnogo mnogo odličnih ideja, koje su mi se baš dopale, tipa salvete, lutkina kućica, amajlije itd itd koje baš i nisu imale smisla, ali su se na kraju sve lijepo sklopilo i upakovalo u jednu baš dobru završnicu. Meni se dopalo. 4*

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I really missed out reading this book when I was 14. King packed this baby with all of the tropes YA fiction should contain and made a fun, page turning novel - even if we know how everything is going to turn out. The snarky narrator is an extra bonus. And how cool is it that he wrote this book for his daughter? He even gave a character in the book her name. Did he win Father of the Year when this was first published?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Interesting and slightly odd mixture of Stephen Kings story telling and a slightly more classic/mythological tale than we're used to from the modern prince of horror. This is described by some as Stephen King doing children's literature". Well, I wouldn't really call it that. I'm aware that Mr. King dedicated this to his daughter...but I would suggest that you read it yourself first before giving it to a child, at least a child younger than say, 12. Just my opinion. It's how I'd handle it. The sto Interesting and slightly odd mixture of Stephen Kings story telling and a slightly more classic/mythological tale than we're used to from the modern prince of horror. This is described by some as Stephen King doing children's literature". Well, I wouldn't really call it that. I'm aware that Mr. King dedicated this to his daughter...but I would suggest that you read it yourself first before giving it to a child, at least a child younger than say, 12. Just my opinion. It's how I'd handle it. The story is a fair one and you'll see echos of a lot of Mr. King's other books not to mention echos of other stories going back to early myths and epics. I'll not be adding this to my "permanent collection" and I don't have plans to read it again, but still it's a pretty good yarn. So, what's positive and what's negative? Well there is still the slightly tainted feel I've noted in most of Mr. Kings other stories. (view spoiler)[ Thomas the younger brother who becomes the wizard Flag's (yes the wizard is named Flag...though of course as most of us know he is revealed to be something else far worse than a wizard) cat's-paw we are told repeatedly is not a "bad boy". And at the end of the story (a la Lord of the Rings and Gollum) Thomas is the one who strikes down Flag. However there is a scene where we are "treated to" a description of Thomas stoning an old dog to death because "his father favored the older brother Peter and slighted Thomas. (hide spoiler)] We get a bit this. There are at least two scenes with relatively long detailed descriptions of nose pickers, one of whom likes to eat his discoveries... get the picture? Also there are a few times where the story gets repetitive. We cover a period of time, then we go back and get the story of what went on in detail. Then there are times we drop back and cover the same period of time from another character's point of view. I did get a bit bored, enough to skip some of the book at one point. Still, the story is laid out in a straight forward manner that will I believe draw most in. Even with the repetition it doesn't slow way down often. The story is told in a more traditional style drawing on older stories even fairy tales. It weaves a tale that while I doubt most will find it surprising it will keep you interested and give some enjoyment. I'll go four on this, if just and recommend it. (view spoiler)[ As noted there are echoes of many of Mr. Kings other stories and most notably I think you'll find a sort of "proto" version of the Dark Tower cycle's Kingdom of Gilead here, just not so dark. In that place we see the Man in Black's plots coming to fruition, where here he is thwarted. (hide spoiler)]

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Yates

    Well, this was a REALLY quick read for me. I remembered liking this one from the first time that I read it, but I didn't remember the storyline at all. It turned out to be one of those stories that I just didn't want to put down for long. Eyes of the Dragon is very different from most of King's other works. Written for his tween-age daughter because she complained that he had not written anything that she was interested in or felt comfortable reading, the Eyes of the Dragon is basically King's t Well, this was a REALLY quick read for me. I remembered liking this one from the first time that I read it, but I didn't remember the storyline at all. It turned out to be one of those stories that I just didn't want to put down for long. Eyes of the Dragon is very different from most of King's other works. Written for his tween-age daughter because she complained that he had not written anything that she was interested in or felt comfortable reading, the Eyes of the Dragon is basically King's take on a Young Adult level Fairy Tale. The story takes place in the Kingdom of Delain, which is located in In-World, the setting of the Dark Tower series and is told from the perspective of a story teller who is telling the reader a tale of old from his lands. I enjoyed the perspective that King chose to tell the tale from and the way that the teller poses questions and comments directly to the reader. I think that this method works great especially considering the target audience of the story as the story teller method keeps them a bit distanced from the harsher elements of the story (which isn't entirely pleasant, duh it's King!) while involving them more in the story by asking them to come up with their own conclusions about certain aspects and not entirely holding their hand through the whole thing. Overall, I found this to be an enjoyable tale of suspense with a good mix of emotions brought to the reader from betrayal, redemption, perseverance and yes, even a little love.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    The single worst Stephen King novel I have ever read and this man has written his fair share of turds.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Franco Santos

    Un libro escrito para su hija, por ende, es más bien infantil: para chicos. King trató un tema de reyes y magos, de conspiraciones y secretos, de tragedia y traición de una manera soberbia. Es una novela que no tiene escenas macabras, ni sexo ni vocabulario burdo; es una obra para todas las edades. Porque, si bien está dirigido a los niños, no es tan infantil. Un relato excelente, que disfruté muchísimo. En este el autor demuestra que su imaginación no tiene límites. Personajes bien desarrollados Un libro escrito para su hija, por ende, es más bien infantil: para chicos. King trató un tema de reyes y magos, de conspiraciones y secretos, de tragedia y traición de una manera soberbia. Es una novela que no tiene escenas macabras, ni sexo ni vocabulario burdo; es una obra para todas las edades. Porque, si bien está dirigido a los niños, no es tan infantil. Un relato excelente, que disfruté muchísimo. En este el autor demuestra que su imaginación no tiene límites. Personajes bien desarrollados, sentimientos profundos, buena creatividad, punto álgido logrado. Si quieren una historia con una fantasía suave, una prosa exquisita y una forma de narración hermosa, al viejo estilo de los cuentacuentos, este libro es para ustedes.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Wilier

    Me ha gustado, me ha gustado mucho. Una historia de fantasía juvenil, con reyes, príncipes y magos con una narración inedita de parte de SK para un publico bastante joven. Recomendadísima para niños y adolescentes. Para mí fue como leer a C.S Lewis y las crónicas de Narnia, el estilo narrativo tiene siempre en consideración a un publico muy joven y eso es bastante agradable viniendo de este autor que ya conocemos. Debo decir que el inicio me costó, pensaba “otra vez la típica historia de príncipes Me ha gustado, me ha gustado mucho. Una historia de fantasía juvenil, con reyes, príncipes y magos con una narración inedita de parte de SK para un publico bastante joven. Recomendadísima para niños y adolescentes. Para mí fue como leer a C.S Lewis y las crónicas de Narnia, el estilo narrativo tiene siempre en consideración a un publico muy joven y eso es bastante agradable viniendo de este autor que ya conocemos. Debo decir que el inicio me costó, pensaba “otra vez la típica historia de príncipes y magos” de no saber que era Sk no me habría interesado en continuarla, pero a medida que iba avanzando la historia fue haciéndose cada vez mas interesante y apasionante. Randall Flagg es el mago en esta historia, con ese aliciente es un motivo extra para animarse a leer este libro, Flagg conspira y confabula un plan malévolo que lleva a cabo en contra del reino de Delaín y mas concretamente sobre la familia real, dicho plan es llevado a cabo a la perfección pero Thomas guarda un secreto y Peter no se va a rendir en ningún momento. Quienes en el desarrollo de los acontecimientos pasan de niños a adolescentes. Es frustrante ver como Flagg le resultó tan fácil hacerse con las suyas al inicio de la historia, sin embargo teniendo en cuenta que la historia esta hecha para gente muy joven es comprensible pensar que el autor no quiso enredar mucho la trama, manteniendo el conflicto lo mas simple posible para no perder la atención de este lector, que puede ser el primer libro que esté leyendo en su vida. Leyendo un poco acerca de este libro, me he encontrado que SK escribe este libro para su hija Naomi (Hay un personaje secundario con este nombre) con la intención que se acercara a la lectura, la niña llegó a decir que los libros de su papá eran aburridos y luego de leer este dijo que lo único malo era que se terminaba, así que misión cumplida por parte de SK. Para quienes lean la torre oscura sabrán apreciar ciertos detalles que aquí conocemos, el pasado de Flagg, la aparición de la bola de cristal, la tierra de Delaín, sabemos que Roland Deshain lo menciona en alguna ocasión. El final es muy SK, un poco crudo sin perder su aspecto fantástico y apto para menores de edad. Una historia redonda y bien hecha. 5/5 con creces. spoiler: (view spoiler)[Los lectores de SK se darán cuenta que que el autor toma prestado un recurso historia de Rita Hayworth y la redención de Shawshank, ¿O tal vez al revés? Aquello en donde el recluso tiene la fuga en mente pero requiere de una tarea que debe ejecutar tortuasamente por años. Es un recurso que es de alguna manera reciclado en esta historia. Thomas y Dennis son mencionados por el pistolero en La llegada de los tres, Roland dice que estas dos personas iban detrás de Randall Flagg. Tal vez Roland se sintió motivado de hacer lo mismo con el hombre de negro luego de ver eso, sólo tal vez. Se menciona que al estar molesto, los ojos de Flagg brillan como la plata, característica que también posee Pennywise en "Eso" y Victor Pascow en Cementerio de Animales. Flagg sabe que volverse invisible es imposible -incluso por magia-, pero no ser percibido, eso sí es posible y esta habilidad es conocida como "Dim" la domina muy bien. Otros usuarios del Dim son Sarey la callada, de "Doctor sueño"; Scott landon, en la historia de Lisey; los "Sleepwalkers", del relato homónimo; Rhea, de Coos de la "Torre oscura"; y Carol Gerber, de "Corazones en la Atlantis" que la prendió de un activista llamado Raymond Flieger uno de los alias de Randall Flagg. "Algunas mujeres hablan a sus esposos por las noches sobre Rhiannon, la bruja oscura de la Coos", quizás sea Rhea de Coos, de la Torre Oscura IV: Mago y Crystal, quien utiliza una esfera rosa para espiar a la gente. Una de las 13 esferas mágicas creadas por Maerlyn. De hecho En los ojos del Dragón se dice que Flagg tiene un cristal amarillo verdoso con bordes desiguales, con el que a veces puede espiar lo que sucede en el reino, quizás este es un fragmento de una las 13 esferas mágicas. Un ganadero menciona que es natal del reino de Delain en el relato "Las hermanita Eluria", que también es protagonizado por Roland Deschain. así como el reino de Garlan vecino a Delain, es mencionado por Roland en los tomos IV y VI de la torre oscura. Flagg estaba leyendo el Necrominicon de HP Lovecraft Luego se sentó, dio la vuelta a su reloj de arena y comenzó a leer un enorme libro de conjuros. Flagg llevaba leyendo aquel tomo, que se hallaba encuadernado con piel humana, desde hacia mil años, y sólo había logrado consultar una cuarta parte. Leer demasiado de este libro, escrito en las altas y distantes Planicies de Leng por un demente llamado Alhazred, podía ocasionar fácilmente la locura. El juez Peyna tiene pesadillas, atormentado sueña que todo el centro de la cuidad se ha vuelto sangriento, y en esas pesadillas ellas incluso el mismo sol parece un ojo agonizante inyectado de sangre. Un ojo rojo como la sangre, es el símbolo que representa al Rey Carmesí, un villano principal en la saga de "La Torre Oscura". Al final de los ojos del dragón, Thomas decide ir tras Flagg, pues él siente que todavía esta cerca en este mundo u otros, lo cual encaja muy bien dentro de la saga de la Torre oscura donde nos enteramos que existen muchos mundos aparte de este, y Flagg como se habarán dado cuenta puede viajar entre ellos. (hide spoiler)]

  30. 4 out of 5

    Trudi

    This is still one of my favourite King books -- a whimsical fairy tale set in a magical landscape; a Dark Tower for younger readers if you will. I couldn't quite give it five stars this time around, since it's not as epic or grand as something like The Talisman, but my sheer enjoyment of the story has not diminished with the years. King weaves a truly engaging spell with this one, which prominently features the uber-villainous Flagg (who has shown up in many King novels, sometimes under other na This is still one of my favourite King books -- a whimsical fairy tale set in a magical landscape; a Dark Tower for younger readers if you will. I couldn't quite give it five stars this time around, since it's not as epic or grand as something like The Talisman, but my sheer enjoyment of the story has not diminished with the years. King weaves a truly engaging spell with this one, which prominently features the uber-villainous Flagg (who has shown up in many King novels, sometimes under other names, but always just as evil). This time he is the King's magician. I just love the adventure here, and Peter's brave attempt to escape the Needle kept me breathless. While Shawshank will likely always be remembered as THE King prison escape story, there will always be a special place in my heart for the dramatic climax discovered in the pages of The Eyes of the Dragon. Highly recommended for fans of YA Fantasy.

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